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At least these kids won't end up with a record.

http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/ ... a20fdd2c51

Students cash in on junk-food ban
Trio of teen entrepreneurs selling nixed snacks to classmates, teachers
Cassidy Olivier, The Province
Published: Thursday, September 18, 2008

At first glance, they appear to be your average trio of teenage boys more concerned with hockey and girls than business and economics.

But come lunchtime and after school, the friends transform from awkward Grade 11s into savvy businessmen who've bypassed the provincial ban on junk-food sales in schools to amass a tiny fortune.

And according to the boys -- who go by the monikers WeeMan, The Fern and Goggles -- business in the underground junk-food world has been booming ever since the school bell rang two weeks ago.

In total, the students at Moscrop Secondary in Burnaby figure they've made about $300 by selling classmates and teachers contraband candy, chocolate bars and potato chips -- foods that have been removed from high-school vending machines under legislation that came into effect this September.

"Business is excellent and it is blooming," said Goggles, 16. "It is a great success." "It is the best idea we've ever had," added The Fern, 16.

He said the idea to sell the banned products began as a joke when he learned about the junk-food ban in high schools. The ban will be extended to elementary schools in January.

But the jokes became reality when he teamed up with Goggles and WeeMan, 15, and made a bulk purchase of candy and chocolate.

Original Fresh, their business, now has its own Facebook page and the trio hand out business cards to their customers. This week, WeeMan began a text-messaging service and classroom deliveries. Yesterday, he said he made about $40.

"The kids want it and we just want to give them what they want," said WeeMan. "In my personal opinion, I'm not really into it for the money." He said Skittles, Fuzzy Peaches and Kit Kat bars are the hot items.

Grade 8 student Anna Codrescu, whose weekly candy expenditure ranges up to $10 and who is a dedicated Original Fresh customer, said the boys provide a needed service.

"It is not like they are trying to get the whole school addicted to candy," she said. "Kids are kids and they want to enjoy their childhood. Nobody wants to eat healthy all the time." Moscrop principal Reno Ciolfi said he's spoken with the boys and doesn't take issue as long as they don't do business on school property or from their lockers, as they'd initially been doing.

But ultimately, he'd like to see them put a stop to their sales, which have now moved to a nearby plaza.

"The boys are reasonable students and are certainly not looking for any trouble," he said. "They are experimenting in a new situation." WeeMan said the group is looking to expand to neighbouring schools and possibly throughout B.C. He said he's already pitched the idea to a student at Burnaby Central Secondary.

<a href="mailto:colivier@theprovince.com">colivier@theprovince.com</a>

© The Vancouver Province 2008

Peace
Wait until the pigolice start ticketing them, stealing their candy and junk food and
even imprisoning and beating them! Mislegislation begets sadism, violence, more
mislegislation and even murder!
Quote:Wait until the pigolice start ticketing them, stealing their candy and junk food and even imprisoning and beating them! Mislegislation begets sadism, violence, more mislegislation and even murder!

Anyone caught with a bag of Skittles will automatically be charged with intent to distribute?
Mandatory minimums for Pixie Stix™ due to the high sugar content and the fact that the aboriginals use them most.

Peace
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/popcorn.gif" alt="Popcorn" title="pocorn" />
I hope you're not telling me that popcorn is illegal to grow now 'cause I haven't even enjoyed any from this year's crop yet.

Peace
purple popcorn
yum
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smoke.gif" alt="Smoke" title="smoke" />
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columb ... eroes.html

Students running underground junk food trade donate profits to charity
Last Updated: Saturday, November 22, 2008 | 3:02 PM ET
CBC News

Two high school students in Burnaby, B.C., who made headlines in September for selling junk food out of their lockers are helping others with their earnings.

Frank Summerford and Mark Stoklosa, who initially asked only to be identified as The Fern and Goggles, respectively, grabbed media attention for starting up an underground junk food shop after a provincial ban on candy and chocolate bar sales in B.C. schools came into effect in September.

Within the first week of business, the two made roughly $200 selling candy and chocolate bars out of their lockers at Moscrop Secondary School. The school has said it wouldn't punish the young merchants but would try to persuade them to stop selling unhealthy treats.

The formerly clandestine operation isn't about making a profit — the students are using their earnings to give back to the community.

"Both of us have jobs and we figured we don't really need the money, so we decided to give it charity," Summerford said. "For each month, we pick a charity and donate as much as we can to that charity."

On Friday, the two Grade 11 students presented the BC Children's Hospital with $500, which is the profit they made between September and October.

"These men here, these brave superheroes, they've raised money for Children's Hospital and it's going to help us build a brand new hospital," said Joanne Newman, the philanthropic officer at BC Children's Hospital.

"It's these grassroots fundraisers that are critically important to our campaign, so these boys coming out and raising money … is incredible."

Summerford and Stoklosa said their first donation was a success.

"It feels great. We know it's going to go to good research or a good cause, so we gave it away and helped out the community," Stoklosa said.

The young entrepreneurs intend to donate November's profits to the Royal Canadian Legion and are looking for a food bank or homeless shelter to help in December.

Peace
Quote:http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbi...eroes.html

Students running underground junk food trade donate profits to charity
Last Updated: Saturday, November 22, 2008 | 3:02 PM ET
CBC News

Two high school students in Burnaby, B.C., who made headlines in September for selling junk food out of their lockers are helping others with their earnings.

Frank Summerford and Mark Stoklosa, who initially asked only to be identified as The Fern and Goggles, respectively, grabbed media attention for starting up an underground junk food shop after a provincial ban on candy and chocolate bar sales in B.C. schools came into effect in September.

Within the first week of business, the two made roughly $200 selling candy and chocolate bars out of their lockers at Moscrop Secondary School. The school has said it wouldn't punish the young merchants but would try to persuade them to stop selling unhealthy treats.

The formerly clandestine operation isn't about making a profit — the students are using their earnings to give back to the community.

"Both of us have jobs and we figured we don't really need the money, so we decided to give it charity," Summerford said. "For each month, we pick a charity and donate as much as we can to that charity."

On Friday, the two Grade 11 students presented the BC Children's Hospital with $500, which is the profit they made between September and October.

"These men here, these brave superheroes, they've raised money for Children's Hospital and it's going to help us build a brand new hospital," said Joanne Newman, the philanthropic officer at BC Children's Hospital.

"It's these grassroots fundraisers that are critically important to our campaign, so these boys coming out and raising money … is incredible."

Summerford and Stoklosa said their first donation was a success.

"It feels great. We know it's going to go to good research or a good cause, so we gave it away and helped out the community," Stoklosa said.

The young entrepreneurs intend to donate November's profits to the Royal Canadian Legion and are looking for a food bank or homeless shelter to help in December.

Peace


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