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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Intell ... htest_Dogs

Methodology

The author used "understanding of new commands" and "obey first command" as his standards of intelligence. He surveyed dog trainers and compiled this list of dog intelligence. While this method of ordering dog intelligence is acceptable for training and working with dogs, it does not apply to the genetic intelligence which can be measured by ingenuity and understanding of common situations[citation needed]. The drawback of this rating scale is that it is heavily weighted towards obedience (e.g. working or guard dogs) rather than understanding or creativity (e.g. hunting dogs), so some breeds may appear lower on the list due to their stubborn or independent nature, but this nature does not make them unintelligent or impossible to train.

* 1-10 Brightest Dogs
* 11-26 Excellent Working Dogs
* 27-39 Above Average Working Dogs
* 40-54 Average Working/Obedience Intelligence
* 55-69 Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence
* 70-79 Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence

Ranking of dogs by breed

Brightest Dogs
* Understanding of New Commands: Fewer than 5 repetitions.
* Obey First Command: 95% of the time or better.


1. Border Collie
2. Poodle
3. German Shepherd
4. Golden Retriever
5. Doberman Pinscher
6. Shetland Sheepdog
7. Labrador Retriever
8. Papillon
9. Rottweiler
10. Australian Cattle Dog

Excellent Working Dogs
* Understanding of New Commands: 5 to 15 repetitions.
* Obey First Command: 85% of the time or better.

11. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
12. Miniature Schnauzer
13. English Springer Spaniel
14. Belgian Tervuren
15. Schipperke
Belgian Sheepdog
16. Scotch Collie
Keeshond
17. German Shorthaired Pointer
18. Flat-Coated Retriever
English Cocker Spaniel
Standard Schnauzer
19. Brittany
20. American Cocker Spaniel
21. Weimaraner
22. Belgian Malinois
Bernese Mountain Dog
23. Pomeranian
24. Irish Water Spaniel
25. Vizsla
26. Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Above Average Working Dogs
* Understanding of New Commands: 15 to 25 repetitions.
* Obey First Command: 70% of the time or better

27. Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Puli
Yorkshire Terrier
28. Giant Schnauzer
29. Airedale Terrier
Bouvier des Flandres
30. Border Terrier
Briard
31. Welsh Springer Spaniel
32. Manchester Terrier
33. Samoyed
34. Field Spaniel
Newfoundland
Australian Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier
Gordon Setter
Bearded Collie
35. Cairn Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Irish Setter
36. Norwegian Elkhound
37. Affenpinscher
Silky Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
English Setter
Pharaoh Hound
Clumber Spaniel
38. Norwich Terrier
39. Dalmatian

Average Working/Obedience Intelligence
* Understanding of New Commands: 25 to 40 repetitions.
* Obey First Command: 50% of the time or better.

40. Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Bedlington Terrier
Fox Terrier (Smooth)
41. Curly Coated Retriever
Irish Wolfhound
42. Kuvasz
Australian Shepherd
43. Saluki
Finnish Spitz
Pointer
44. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
German Wirehaired Pointer
Black and Tan Coonhound
American Water Spaniel
45. Siberian Husky
Bichon Frise
English Toy Spaniel
46. Tibetan Spaniel
English Foxhound
Otterhound
American Foxhound
Greyhound
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
47. West Highland White Terrier
Scottish Deerhound
48. Boxer
Great Dane
49. Dachshund
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
50. Alaskan Malamute
51. Whippet
Chinese Shar Pei
Wire Fox Terrier
52. Rhodesian Ridgeback
53. Ibizan Hound
Welsh Terrier
Irish Terrier
54. Boston Terrier
Akita

Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence
* Understanding of New Commands: 40 to 80 repetitions.
* Obey First Command: 30% of the time or better.

55. Skye Terrier
56. Norfolk Terrier
Sealyham Terrier
57. Pug
58. French Bulldog
59. Brussels Griffon
Maltese
60. Italian Greyhound
61. Chinese Crested
62. Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
Tibetan Terrier
Japanese Chin
Lakeland Terrier
63. Old English Sheepdog
64. Great Pyrenees
65. Scottish Terrier
Saint Bernard
66. Bull Terrier
67. Chihuahua
68. Lhasa Apso
69. Bullmastiff

Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence
* Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more.
* Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.

70. Shih Tzu
71. Basset Hound
72. Mastiff
Beagle
73. Pekingese
74. Bloodhound
75. Borzoi
76. Chow Chow
77. Bulldog
78. Basenji
79. Afghan Hound
I find that animals are such individuals, this seems like making a blanket stereotype statement about people. Also, the more "domesticated" an animal is, the less in-touch with its own intrinsic intelligence. Also, as all of us on this site know, obedience does not equal intelligence!


Just ask a cat!
My 'most naturally disobedient' Boston comes in at #54... I never figured that her being STUPID played a part in her 'naturally disobedience'... she's very very clever-like a pathological as in socio-pathological.. very entertaining, very high energy... not real quick to 'get it' but when she does get it she retains it. Very primal lol

I get what they've done here and they do disclaim that they haven't judged for 'creativity' like 'they'll be the ones to determine if and when they will respond and then it will be on their own timing'... my neighbor's dog is an English Setter- a hunting dog and he's got the rep for being one who strolls to his own hard headed beat too. These types of dogs have to do their own fair share of decision makings being bird hunting dogs. Creative Crafty pays off in bird hunting.

I was reading on SJ's type of dog-the Shiba-Imu and it said they 'should be watched around other small animals due to their hunting skills' hahahaha

you can go to the site and click on any of the breeds mentioned on this list. Very interesting and accurate as far as the dogs I've known and loved.
My dog understands everything I say, but she just doesn't give a damn.
Thor learned how to sit, lay down, shake paws, and stand up on his hind legs on his very first evening home with us.

<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/applause.gif" alt="Applause" title="applause" />

Quote:Just ask a cat!

0ur cat is dumb as a brick. He's a very affectionate cat, but l think he might a touch 'special'.
[quote author="Wahya"]Thor learned how to sit, lay down, shake paws, and stand up on his hind legs on his very first evening home with us.

Wub huddled around the radiator together about 8 assorted species and breeds. They know the difference (duh) of when I'm moving through the house because the phone is ringing-they part the seas really well for me to pass-and when I brush my teeth CLUEBURGER and GET MY PURSE moving through the house. PURSE=BYE BYE... they know (duh) everybody's name, including the other pets and will find whoever I'm looking for.

My last pup is like the last kid in a big family. She didn't run and cringe when I realized the girls who get to always go bye bye broke into a thing of cookies and ate them all up-she looked PROUD of her smartness to do that. And I gave her a kiss on her fluffy cheek while driving as she likes to ride with her front feet on the console so she can be my backseat driver. of Sentry agent.

They're all dependably consistent enough for me to know their strengths and their weaknesses... I have a few who no man would tear asunder and the rest do their pack thing behind them. I have a few who would open the doors for killers if they had some cookies on them. I have a few who have locked the deadbolt on me in their excitement of my potential entry. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/uhoh.gif" alt="Uhoh" title="uhoh" /> When the earth starts quaking I can tell from the few different ways they act. So the 'creativity' intelligence is important to me too. Now if you had a dullard without creativity dog that never got it... I hope it isn't the only dog in your family.
Quote:My dog understands everything I say, but she just doesn't give a damn.

Is your dog only 20 pounds? I was reading up on them last night. That's as small as my Jessie girl. I thought Shiba Inu's were at least medium sized dogs. That's a good size dog-20 pounds-
Quote:Thor learned how to sit, lay down, shake paws, and stand up on his hind legs on his very first evening home with us.

<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/applause.gif" alt="Applause" title="applause" />

[quote author="Quantum0bserver"]Just ask a cat!

0ur cat is dumb as a brick. He's a very affectionate cat, but l think he might a touch 'special'.[/quote]


Thor looks like my neighbor dog George kind of-George is an Australian Shepherd I think Husky mix-a huge woolly bear of a freckled faced dog who shows his teeth like a horse when he's happy to see you.
Quote:[quote author="Samurai Jane"]My dog understands everything I say, but she just doesn't give a damn.

Is your dog only 20 pounds? I was reading up on them last night. That's as small as my Jessie girl. I thought Shiba Inu's were at least medium sized dogs. That's a good size dog-20 pounds-[/quote]

My girl weighs 17 lbs. Shibas look bigger in pics than they really are...probably because everyone expects an Akita-appearing dog to be large. And it seems like the American Shibas get a bit larger than the ones in Japan.
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/dunno.gif" alt="Dunno" title="dunno" />

This is from the breed standard:
"Males are generally 14 1/2–17 1/2 inches (35–43 cm) high at the withers and average around 23 pounds (10 kg). Females are slightly smaller at 13 1/2–15 1/2 inches (33–41 cm) and averaging 17 pounds (8 kg)."
When I saw the topic of this thread, I was sure it was about politicians. When Republicans and Democrats weren't even listed in the Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence category, I was positive about it. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smoke.gif" alt="Smoke" title="smoke" />
And the list can't address the intelligence of mutts, because of the infinite genetic variety in them. I never owned any purebreed dogs until I was nearly 40. I think mongrels are healthier and less high-strung.
I've never had a mutt whose parentage was known to me before my two Lab/Cockers came aboard and then their girl whose father was a Pomeranian. I'm not even sure about the Lab part to my two curly haired mid sized black kids. They are so 'rubbery' about 45 pounds, not solid at all like my Boston tanks. Like they're light boned and very flexible-curling up into tiny balls like cats.
Quote:When I saw the topic of this thread, I was sure it was about politicians. When Republicans and Democrats weren't even listed in the Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence category, I was positive about it. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smoke.gif" alt="Smoke" title="smoke" />


I thought maybe it would be a treatise on my ex-husband! Thankfully, no.
the comments are hysterically clever... I've had a few cats who got righteously PISSED when they lost at attempts to trick them. or outsmart them. I'm bearing forever a 3 inch scar like a razor cut due to such an exercise. lol

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/ ... marts-cats


Cats outsmarted in psychologist's test
Strings experiment shows limits of feline intelligence

* James Meikle
* guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 16 June 2009 14.08 BST


Cats are not stupid, they're just different. Photograph: Getty

It will cause outrage among some cat owners, but research suggests the pets are not as clever as some humans assumed – or at least they think in a way we have yet to fathom.

Psychology lecturer Britta Osthaus says cats do not understand cause-and-effect connections between objects. She tested the thought processes of 15 of them by attaching fish and biscuit treats to one end of a piece of string, placing them under a plastic screen to make them unreachable and then seeing if the cats could work out that pulling on the other end of the string would pull the treat closer.

They were tested in three ways, using a single baited string, two parallel strings where only one was baited, and two crossed strings where only one was baited.

The single string test proved no problem, but unlike dogs (which Osthaus has previously tested) no cat consistently chose correctly between two parallel strings. With two crossed strings, one cat always made the wrong choice and others succeeded no more than might be expected by chance.

Osthaus, of Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, said: "This finding is somehow surprising as cats regularly use their paws and claws to pull things towards them during play and hunting. They performed even worse than dogs, which can at least solve the parallel string task."

The study helped show the limits of feline intelligence, said Osthaus, who conducted the research while a teaching fellow at Exeter University. "If we know their limits we won't expect too much of them, which in turn is important for their welfare. I am not trying to say cats are stupid, just they are different. We are so anthropomorphic we can't see the world through their eyes."

There is just one consolation. Humans don't understand string theory either.
Dogs can be excellent judges of character concerning strangers. I have read anecdotal evidence
of that.
Quote:Dogs can be excellent judges of character concerning strangers. I have read anecdotal evidence
of that.


they seem to pick up cues from the humans very easily. I notice it when my pack don't like someone as they usually like everyone. Some are more discerning than others. Like people.
The local optician's shop has an entire wall with a list of breeds who ate their owner's glasses. I saw it when I went there to get my Shiba Inu-chewed glasses repaired. The worst offenders are schnauzers, beagles, dachsunds and golden retrievers. Also, I know someone whose $1200 hearing aid was swallowed by a dachsund and no, they didn't wait for it to go thru the dog, they bought a new one.
[video:1bn8330b]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq_UBpkgz2s[/video:1bn8330b]
Quote:Pets killed
Arthur Gorrie | 5th August 2009

Print larger | smaller
OUTRAGE: Sheree Barkle (front) with the collar from her poisoned family pet, backed by angry neighbours Sharon Spriggs, Alice Hammersley (holding Xanthe Sheridan) and Tricia Hammerseley, in Golden Hind Avenue this week.

Gympie TimesSOMEONE is stalking and killing the dogs of Cooloola Cove, particularly in and near Golden Hind Avenue.

Family pets and protectors are dying in agony from what seems to be a variety of cruel baits, some laced with glass shards, some with an unknown poison.

Of several dogs poisoned recently, only a couple have survived.

Sheree Barkle knows what it is like to lose a canine friend. And when her baby arrives, she has concerns it will also be in danger of picking up a bait.

“There are six dead that we know of,” said Tricia Hammersley. “Mostly they are in Golden Hind Avenue, but there has also been one in Nautilus Drive and one in Vanguard Court,” she said.


http://www.gympietimes.com.au/story/200 ... cove-in-f/
Sometimes i wonder how such things can happen when dogs were supposed and are supposed to have keen senses well difined and capable of detecting a rancid substance. Maybe they are not as smart as are portrayed <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/whistle.gif" alt="Whistle" title="whistle" />
Quote:
Quote:Pets killed
Arthur Gorrie | 5th August 2009

Print larger | smaller
OUTRAGE: Sheree Barkle (front) with the collar from her poisoned family pet, backed by angry neighbours Sharon Spriggs, Alice Hammersley (holding Xanthe Sheridan) and Tricia Hammerseley, in Golden Hind Avenue this week.

Gympie TimesSOMEONE is stalking and killing the dogs of Cooloola Cove, particularly in and near Golden Hind Avenue.

Family pets and protectors are dying in agony from what seems to be a variety of cruel baits, some laced with glass shards, some with an unknown poison.

Of several dogs poisoned recently, only a couple have survived.

Sheree Barkle knows what it is like to lose a canine friend. And when her baby arrives, she has concerns it will also be in danger of picking up a bait.

“There are six dead that we know of,” said Tricia Hammersley. “Mostly they are in Golden Hind Avenue, but there has also been one in Nautilus Drive and one in Vanguard Court,” she said.


http://www.gympietimes.com.au/story/200 ... cove-in-f/
Sometimes i wonder how such things can happen when dogs were supposed and are supposed to have keen senses well difined and capable of detecting a rancid substance. Maybe they are not as smart as are portrayed <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/whistle.gif" alt="Whistle" title="whistle" />


I think it is their wolf genetics that cause them to wolf down any food like substance they find, especially if any other animal is around. My stupid neighbor recently found some ancient bags of grain somewhere and is feeding it to his chickens, which is enough to instigate MY dogs into eating as much of what the chickens are after as they can find.

I was mowing vast quantity of grounds this morning and found several loads of dog poop heavily laced with foil. Dogs are not smart when it comes to potential food items, especially human carbohydrate potentialities. lol My dogs had a real dog fight the other day over an empty plastic envelope thing that had had some ramen flavoring in it that they'd recovered out of the trash. They eat stuff like that every chance they get-paper towels with just the essence of food on it is good to go to.
Canines are omnivores and opportunists who will try to eat just about anything and everything. It is possible to train them not to take food that is just lying about or not to take it from strangers. Poisonings are just one more reason I won't leave mine outside unsupervised. I wish these sick fucks would get raptured or killed off so the rest of us could get on with living in harmony.
Quote:Canines are omnivores and opportunists who will try to eat just about anything and everything. It is possible to train them not to take food that is just lying about or not to take it from strangers. Poisonings are just one more reason I won't leave mine outside unsupervised. I wish these sick fucks would get raptured or killed off so the rest of us could get on with living in harmony.


funny thing is , my cat, one in particular hunts down just about any intruding animal on our property. The funny thing is, a couple nights ago while I was in the kitchen it brought in a half eaten hotdog that someone must have mistakenly discarded near our house. Don't you just love it when folks toss stuff in your yard? I have painstakenly fed and cared my best for most children who are the least bit polite and honest for some time now and still on and on there are riddles of coyote minded ideals littered among the packs of canine species.

Such is just moving my patience to rudeness occasionally.


Rendered as the DNA sympathetically directs I would confer to notice.
Quote:I have painstakenly fed and cared my best for most children who are the least bit polite and honest for some time now and still on and on there are riddles of coyote minded ideals littered among the packs of canine species.



???????????? <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/dunno.gif" alt="Dunno" title="dunno" />

could you elaborate on that point?
I am not from around here. Nor do I truly feel as though I am from anywhere anymore, having been ripped from all I knew as a child and replaced in a foreign area due to monetary concerns that my guardians had to deal with. I have done my very best with what has been given to me and will continue to do so as long as I have a breath inside my bones and flesh. Hey what was the name of this thread anyway?
Dunno
Quote:Dunno i guess it is just me eh????????????????????? <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/dunno.gif" alt="Dunno" title="dunno" />


After the initial "nope" response I figured the conversation was dead. And now that you've adjusted it, I still don't understand what you are talking about. Not that it is a requirement, but I assume I am not the only one.

That is why I asked for further elaboration, in an attempt to understand what I figure you want to communicate, or you wouldn't write it in a public forum.
i am sorry you don't understand.

Maybe someone should have labeled me autistic instead of all the other things i have been diagnosed as.

I did try my best to elaborate QO.


[Image: b_110119.jpg]
Moscow subway dogs.

[Image: 11.jpg]
Russian scientists say that Moscow stray dogs became much smarter. The four legged oldest human’s friends demonstrate real smartness such as riding the Moscow metro every morning to get from their suburban places of living to the fat regions of Moscow center. Once they arrive to the downtown they demonstrate different new, previously unseen for the dog skills. Those skills can include “the hunt for shawarma” for example, the popular among Muscovites eastern cuisine dish. This hunt scene can be seen as this:
Regular Moscow busy street with some small food kiosks. A middle-aged man buys himself a piece of hot fast food and walks aside chewing it without a rush. Then just in a second he jumps up frightened - some doggy has sneaked up on him and barked out loudly. His tasty snack falls out from his hands down to the ground and the dog gets it. Just ten minutes later, on the same place, the teen youngster loses his dinner in exactly the same manner. The modern Russian dogs are on their urban hunt.

“This method of ambushing people from their back is widely exercised by Moscow dogs”, saying A. Poiarkov, working in Ecology and Evolution Institute of Moscow. “The main point here is to define who would drop the food scared and who won’t, but the dogs are great psychologists they can do it better than us”.

Moscow ecologists think that dogs started acquiring this habits in 1990s, when the Soviet union collapsed and Moscow has fell into the hands of new class of Russian capitalists. They understood the true value of the downtown realty underestimated by previous Communist owners and became removing all the industrial complexes Moscow had in its centre to its outskirts. Those places were used by homeless dogs as a shelter often, so the dogs had to move together with their houses, so they had to learn how to travel Moscow subway - first to get to the centre in the morning then back home in the evening, just as us people.

The commercial revolution of Moscow made their usual feeding places like trash bins out of direct reach, so they had to get to know new ways of getting their piece of food. That’s how appeared those “Shawarma hunts”. Sometimes though they use more gentle methods. Young girl sits on the bench to eat her hot dog - a big cute looking dog appears from the surrounding bushes and puts her head on her knees. The girl can’t help herself sharing the hotdog with a dog.
Among some more amazing skill those Moscow dogs are the ability not to miss their stop while going on the subway train. Biologists say dogs have very nice sense of time which helps them not to miss their destination. Another skill they have is to cross the road on the green traffic light. “They don’t react on color, but on the picture they see on the traffic light”, Moscow scientist tells. Also they choose often the last or the first metro car - those are less crowded usually.
It’s funny but the ecologists studying Moscow stray dogs also tell the dogs don’t miss a chance to get some play while on their travel in the subway. They are fond of jumping in the train just seconds before the doors shut closed risking their tails be jammed. “They do it for fun, just they have enough food”, they conclude.

http://englishrussia.com/?p=2462

More pics and a couple of vids at the link.
I am surprised that the Animal Control folks don't take the dogs off the trains ... <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/cow.gif" alt="Cow" title="cow" />
The best true story of dog loyalty was the russian dog whose master went to war and died in combat, the dog will go everyday to the train station from where his owner left, he will go clockwise at the same time every day and wait until the last train arrived then back home, he did for like 12 years until the day he died, the russians even built hima monument called "loyalty".

More close to home, my dog is a mix of rhodesian backridge and hound and she is the smartest dog I have ever seen and very good about judging people, so far only 1 person coming to my house she went nuts, she barked and growl all the time the guy was at my house, I didn't like the guy a bad vibe was coming from him, but my dog caught that vibe right away. She is very smart and special. We named her Ginger. She jumps like a deer when playing in the backyard, it is hilarious
Please post a pic of her if possible. Would love to see her. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/wub.gif" alt="Wub" title="wub" /> Just from the photos and movies about the Russian subway dogs, I can tell the people just live and let live. No one on the subway bothers the dogs at all and vice versa.
I had an eccentric dog who liked lounging on the roof of my car. All was well until I moved to an apartment and other tenant's dogs started getting on the roofs of their owner's cars. I didn't know that was going on until the secretary of the college Republicans bitched me out about it: "It's your dog's fault because our dogs didn't do that until your dog moved here."
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/rofl.gif" alt="Rofl" title="rofl" />
I did keep a straight face until she left, but I wondered why she didn't notice how cool it was, that dogs learn stuff like that from each other.
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