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I thought someone here might understand what is happening to your body when you actually feel a "Broken Heart."

I've done a little chakra work, and am at least familiar with the feelings of emotional injury on that area. I usually feel flow or hurt in the center around the sternum.

But since my recent emotional upheavels, I have had occassion to have the very specific feeling of a broken heart. It is specifically over to the left, directly over the heart. It is a constriction and feeling of DEATH.

I was wondering if anyone here knows exactly what your physical body is doing to get this feeling? At first I thought maybe it was only a psychological construct - but then you have to wonder, why did they start calling it a Broken Heart to start with? Why is it so precisely located and related to that specific type of experience?

HRM - I'm thinking you must know something about this? <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/hi.gif" alt="Hi" title="hi" />
A heart that hurts is a heart that works™
I don't know how one mends a broken heart, but maybe your heart will tell you, if you ask and wait for answer.

The heart, not the brain, really is the center of emotion and the repository of emotional memories. Heart transplant recipients know that. Mainstream doctors will probably be the last to acknowledge it.

http://www.sfms.org/AM/Template.cfm?Sect...ENTID=1540
Cellular Memory in Organ Transplants
Leslie A. Takeuchi, BA, PTA

In my experience as a physical therapist assistant, I have come to acknowledge the relevance of thoughts, emotions and spiritual beliefs to healing. I recognize the art of physical therapy to be based upon empirical science and a dualism which views the mind and body as separate, thus drawing a sharp distinction between sensory experiences and physical reality, between subject and object, between mind and matter and between soul and body. However, I also recognize that even though my science provides a rational foundation, it does not allow for the importance of the subjectivity and wholeness I see in my patients whose bodies and minds are inseparable.

In my work with the chronic pain population, I have taken a closer look at this relationship of mind and matter, body and emotions, for keys to how people heal. In this search, I looked into theories of emotions or memories being somehow stored in the tissues of the body and later manifesting in the physical form of pain or disease. What was most striking were the numerous reports of organ transplant recipients who later experienced changes in personality traits, tastes for food, music, activities and even sexual preference. Is it possible that our memories reside deep inside our bodily cells in addition to in our minds?

Current understandings about memory, for example, place this mental capacity solely as a function of the brain. However, the process of memory may be too complex to be explained by measuring brain activity through electroencephalograms or oxygen uptake as recorded on PET scans. Looking at memory as part of the quantum world of sub-atomic systems gives the visual image of tiny specks whizzing around every which way until there is a need for them to come together into some sort of pattern of awareness. But, where do the memories reside?
andace
Candace Pert, author of Molecules of Emotion: Why You Feel the Way You Feel, says, "Memories are stored not only in the brain, but in a psychosomatic network extending into the body . . . all the way out along pathways to internal organs and the very surface of our skin." After having discovered neuropeptides in all body tissues, Pert suggests that through cellular receptors, thoughts or memories may remain unconscious or can become conscious-raising the possibility of physiological connections between memories, organs and the mind.

University of Arizona scientists and co-authors of The Living Energy Universe, Gary Schwartz, PhD, and Linda Russek, PhD, propose the universal living memory hypothesis in which they believe that "all systems stored energy dynamically . . . and this information continued as a living, evolving system after the physical structure had deconstructed." Schwartz and Russek believe this may explain how the information and energy from the donor's tissue can be present, consciously or unconsciously, in the recipient.

Paul Pearsall, MD, a psychoneuroimmunologist and author of The Heart's Code, has researched the transference of memories through organ transplantation. After interviewing nearly 150 heart and other organ transplant recipients, Pearsall proposes the idea that cells of living tissue have the capacity to remember.

Together with Schwartz and Russek, Pearsall conducted a study, published in the Spring 2002 issue of the Journal of Near-Death Studies, entitled, "Changes in Heart Transplant Recipients That Parallel the Personalities of Their Donors." The study consisted of open-ended interviews with 10 heart or heart-lung transplant recipients, their families or friends and the donor's families or friends. The researchers reported striking parallels in each of the cases. The following is a sampling of some these.

In one case, an 18-year-old boy who wrote poetry, played music and composed songs, was killed in an automobile accident. A year after he died his parents came across an audiotape of a song he had written, entitled, "Danny, My Heart is Yours," which was about how he "felt he was destined to die and give his heart to someone." The donor recipient "Danny" of his heart, was an 18-year-old girl, named Danielle. When she met the donor's parents, they played some of his music and she, despite never having heard the song, was able to complete the phrases.

In another case, a seven-month-old boy received a heart from a 16-month-old boy who had drowned. The donor had a mild form of cerebral palsy mostly on the left side. The recipient, who did not display such symptoms prior to the transplant, developed the same stiffness and shaking on the left side.

A 47-year-old Caucasian male received a heart from a 17-year-old African-American male. The recipient was surprised by his new-found love of classical music. What he discovered later was that the donor, who loved classical music and played the violin, had died in a drive-by shooting, clutching his violin case to his chest.

A 29-year-old lesbian and a fast food junkie received a heart from a 19-year-old woman vegetarian who was "man crazy." The recipient reported after her operation that meat made her sick and she was no longer attracted to women. If fact, she became engaged to marry a man.

A 47-year-old man received a heart from a 14-year-old girl gymnast who had problems with eating disorders. After the transplant, the recipient and his family reported his tendency to be nauseated after eating, a childlike exuberance and a little girl's giggle.

Aside from those included in the study, there are other transplant recipients whose stories are worth mentioning, such as Claire Sylvia, a woman who received a heart-lung transplant. In her book entitled, A Change of Heart: A Memoir, Ms. Sylvia describes her own journey from being a healthy, active dancer to becoming ill and eventually needing a heart transplant. After the operation, she reported peculiar changes like cravings for beer and chicken nuggets, neither of which she had a taste for prior to the transplant. She later discovered that these were favorites of her donor. She even learned that her donor had chicken nuggets in his jacket pocket when he died in a motorcycle accident.

Another possible incidence of memory transfer occurred when a young man came out of his transplant surgery and said to his mother, "everything is copasetic." His mother said that he had never used that word before, but now used it all the time. It was later discovered that the word had been a signal, used by the donor and his wife, particularly after an argument, so that when they made up they knew everything was okay. The donor's wife reported that they had had an argument just before the donor's fatal accident and had never made up.

Another amazing story, reported by Pearsall, is that of an eight-year-old girl who received the heart of a ten-year-old girl who had been murdered. After the transplant, the recipient had horrifying nightmares of a man murdering her donor. The dreams were so traumatic that psychiatric help was sought. The girl's images were so specific that the psychiatrist and the mother notified the police. According to the psychiatrist, ". . .using the description from the little girl, they found the murderer. He was easily convicted with the evidence the patient provided. The time, weapon, place, clothes he wore, what the little girl he killed had said to him . . . everything the little heart transplant recipient had reported was completely accurate."

Although medical science is not yet ready to embrace the ideas of cellular memory, one surgeon believes there must be something to it. Mehmet Oz, MD, heart surgeon at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, has invited an energy healer, Julie Motz, into the operating room during transplant surgery. Initially, Motz practiced energy healing to help reduce anxiety prior to surgery and depression following surgery. Then the team noticed that there seemed to be less incidence of rejection in these patients. They were curious to see what would happen if she were present during the operation. Motz registers, through sensations in her own body, the emotional state of the patient during the surgical procedure. Through her touch or words, Motz attempts to alleviate any worries, fears or anger the patient may be experiencing. She works with the recipient's ability to accept the new organ and also works with the donated tissue so it will accept a new body. The results have been favorable, and the team reports reduced rejection and increased survival rates. This may sound outrageous to those who never thought about tissues having feelings or caring about where they would reside, but Dr. Oz believes that it would be a disservice to ignore even the possibility that this method could help.

More studies are being conducted with regard to the phenomenon of organ recipient and donor coincidences. Pearsall, Schwartz and Russek report that, "research is underway at the University of Arizona on a sample of more than 300 transplant patients to determine the incidence of such transcendent memory phenomena using semi-structured interviews and systematic questions."

Intriguing questions remain. What percentage of transplant recipients actually do feel changes in behavior and personality or report changes in food preference or have new memories? Is there a higher incidence of tissue or organ acceptance in those patients who are aware of their consciousness or who have energy work done? Will ordinary science offer more evidence to support that memories are transferred-or will we need a new science? Perhaps more importantly, what does this transcendent phenomenon have to tell us about other healing events?

Leslie A. Takeuchi, BA, PTA is a physical therapist assistant and is currently a graduate student in Holistic Health Education at John. F. Kennedy University in Orinda, California. An article about Julie Motz's energy healing work appeared in the June/July issue of San Francisco Medicine in 2000. Her book, "Hand of Life" was published by Bantam Books in 1998.
Broken Hearts???

mmmmm ....... just listen to the "experts"!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5r49pYLk6Xg


<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/wub.gif" alt="Wub" title="wub" />
[quote author="mycountryfirst."]Broken Hearts???

mmmmm ....... just listen to the "experts"!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5r49pYLk6Xg


Scream
You betcha!


<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/rotatingheart.gif" alt="Rotatingheart" title="rotatingheart" />
Jane - that was great info, thanks. So do you think that maybe those feelings of love and/or pain actually get stored in that specific place, which is why it physically "hurts?"

MyCountry - I even got a smile from watching the BeeGees, Thanks.
Quote:Jane - that was great info, thanks. So do you think that maybe those feelings of love and/or pain actually get stored in that specific place, which is why it physically "hurts?"

MyCountry - I even got a smile from watching the BeeGees, Thanks.
I sure do. And here's another oddity I just remembered: my kid had severe belly button pains on her birthday one time and figured it was probably memories from the day she was born.
There is also a doc in NYC who can cure people of back pain with his own brand of anger management classes. Before I heard of the anger/back pain connection, I made several trips to the ER with sudden & severe back pain. They never found any physical cause, but in retrospect each episode happened right when I became extremely angry.
[quote author="QuantumObserver"]I thought someone here might understand what is happening to your body when you actually feel a "Broken Heart."

HRM - I'm thinking you must know something about this? Rotatingheart
Quote:I'm sure there is a physiology that accompanies
feeling broken hearted
the constriction is from closing your heart off
not from having it broken,
least the way I see it
It' a choice open or closed
If you choose open for yourself
then your brokenheartedness
is kind of assisting you in a bigger openess
Hmm2
I know someone who just got sent to the Mayo Clinic with a mysterious case of pericarditis...inflammation of the heart sack. Everyone awake who hears of this, who knows the person, understands immediately what the deal is. So skeered of love that the heart is stored out of harm's way in a sack that has become too confining.
I think we should start a Red Sock Club - like the red hat ladies. They're way too stuffy though. Even better if we wear ONLY the red socks - *wink, wink* as we dance around the house!

Pinkelephant <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/cheer.gif" alt=":yay:" title="" />
Red socks for the people, comrade.

<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smoke.gif" alt="Smoke" title="smoke" />
[quote author="Wahya"]Red socks for the people, comrade.

Lmao
[quote author="QuantumObserver"]I think we should start a Red Sock Club - like the red hat ladies. They're way too stuffy though. Even better if we wear ONLY the red socks - *wink, wink* as we dance around the house!

Pinkelephant Smoke
Did I tell you guys I got lost the other day
in Thelma and Louise land ?!!??

Red rocks have incredible resonance
only problem was a missed turn
Four hours later I got spit out
about where I'd started lol

Trippy trip !

I know thread drift..

[Image: Thelma023.jpg]

[Image: Thelma017.jpg]

[Image: Thelma015.jpg]
You know me, I love thread drift. You learn the most interesting things that way.

Beautiful scenery. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/applause.gif" alt="Applause" title="applause" />
It was beautiful scenery and
You do learn amazing things that way..
After about eleven hours on the road
As I walked into the Salt Lake airport to pick up a client
I had drif=ted so far I realized I was mentally undressing everybody
and I mean everybody...
You know, that garment thingy
Did they, do they, how'd they
especially with THAT outfit Scream Scream
Scream Scream Scream


How do they ever get anything done ?!!??
HRM is becoming a nudist <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/lol.gif" alt="Lol" title="lol" />
I'm reading a book right now that probably does explain it, QO. It's called The Secret Teachings of Plants (The Intelligence of the Heart in the Direct Perception of Nature). The book is quite technical in nature, because it does go into intricate detail and explains the body as a nonlinear self-organized system. So, it doesn't just take the heart by itself and study it. Here's an excerpt.

Quote:Between 60 and 65% of the cells in the heart are neural cells. They're the same kind and function in the same way as those in the brain. The neural connections between the brain and heart cannot be turned off. Information is always flowing between the two. The heart is directly wired into the central nervous system and brain, interconnected with the amygdala, thalaus, hippocampus, and cortex. There four brain centers are primarily concerned with emotional memories and processing; sensory experience; memory, spatial relationships, the extraction of meaning from sensory inputs from the environment; and problem solving, reasoning, and learning.

The heart makes and releases its own neurotransmitters as it needs them. By monitoring central nervous system functioning, the heart can tell just what neurotransmitters it needs and when in order to enhance its communication with the brain. The heart also has its own memory as the article already posted points out.The heart stores memories which affect consciousness and behavior, how we perceive the world. They most often have to do with specific emotional experiences and the meanings embedded within them. The more intense the emotional experience, the more likely it will be stored by the heart as memory.

Neuronal discharge in the brain--the oscillating pattern of informational pulse release in the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and sometimes the neocortex--is in phase with heart and lung cycles. These discharges are state-dependent. In other words, changes in heart activity--blood pressure, timing of beats, wave pulsations in the blood, hormone and neurotransmitter creation and release, and more--all shift the functioning of these areas of the brain. Information embedded within cardiac outputs directly reaches many of the subcortical areas of the brain involved in emotional processing. The kinds of information that the heart sends significantly shifts functioning of the amygdala thus affecting emotions and other subcortical centers of the brain. The kind of activity displayed in the central nucleus of the amygdala has been found to be dependent on input from the aortic depressor or carotid sinus nerves. Heart researcher Rollin McCraty comments, "Cells within the amygdaloid complex speicifically responded to information from the cardiac cycle."

Single neurons in the brain alter their behavior in response to the signals received from each heartbeat. In response to cardiac input, complexes of neurons in the brain change their grouping and firing patterns. They alter their behavior in order to embed the information received through cardiac function and send it into the central nervous system. The information embedded within cardiac pulses alters central nervous function in behaviorally significant ways. There is, in fact, a two-way communication between heart and brain that shifts physiological functioning and behavior in response to the information exchanged.

Analysis of information flow into the human body has shown that much of it impacts the heart first, flowing to the brain only after it has been perceived by the heart. What this means is that our experience of the world is routed first through our heart, which "things" about the experience and then sends the data to the brain for further processing. When the heart receives information back from the brian about how to respond, the heart analyzes it and decides whether or not the actions that the brain wants to take will be effective. The heart routinely engages in a neural dialogue with the brain and, in essence, the two decide together what actions to take.

That was from the section "The Physical Heart". I suspect I'll find much more in the next sections "The Emotional Heart", so I'll try to come back and add to this as I read on.

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Teachings- ... 1591430356
[Image: 15%20face%20Sock%20Monkey.jpg]

the quickest way to heal any ailing heart is with LAUGHTER... I have a sock monkey and he's always up for a dance and a laff!
The fastest link between the heart and the brain is the vagus nerve. Myelinated neurons alter the millisecond timing of the heart beat breath by breath, causing respiratory sinus arrhythmia; the heart rate changes during the breathing cycle. Unmyelinated neurons cause slower changes. This is a very ancient evolutionary link exhibited by all mammals and some other groups, and the vagus nerve links much of the viscera to the brainstem, bypassing the spinal cord. I monitor the vagus nerve as part of my research. Vagal activity is linked to emotion, and I would suggest vagal activity changes during the negative emotions mentioned earlier.
This looks like it could be used as a self-help book as well as being a good read: The Heart's Code by Paul P. Pearsall.
AMAZON EXCERPTS
Quote:The fastest link between the heart and the brain is the vagus nerve. Myelinated neurons alter the millisecond timing of the heart beat breath by breath, causing respiratory sinus arrhythmia; the heart rate changes during the breathing cycle. Unmyelinated neurons cause slower changes. This is a very ancient evolutionary link exhibited by all mammals and some other groups, and the vagus nerve links much of the viscera to the brainstem, bypassing the spinal cord. I monitor the vagus nerve as part of my research. Vagal activity is linked to emotion, and I would suggest vagal activity changes during the negative emotions mentioned earlier.
Thanks, chrisxs, now we're getting somewhere!
I guess you've heard of how people with earlobe creases are more likely to have heart attacks? And how maybe the earlobe creases are caused by damage to the vagus nerve?
I've noticed that the people I know who have sleep apnea and arrhythmias also have anger issues: they either indulge themselves in angry rages as if they enjoy it, or they suppress their anger completely. Some of them have acid reflux problems, too.
Physical heart problems was the first health issue that caught Louise Hay's eyes and attention to the psychological reasons for all health problems when she was working in a hospital. While talking with the ailing people she realized that all of them had had devastating emotional blows to their hearts...

fascinating info on the vagus nerve. Is that by chance located in the back area? My kid was walking on my back once-he hit something that felt like a major nerve and I felt myself slipping away-blacking out to die-broke out in a sweat, couldn't breathe... I just kept telling myself 'NO' and didn't succumb to the pinching off of my life force.
I notice that the brain waves generated by "dwelling" on a negative situation like a heartbreak are the same frequencies ( below 20 hertz, the lower threshold of hearing) that horror movies and the like use to generate feelings of fear and dread in the pit of the stomach which is sensitive to these frequencies while the ear is not.

Also when "love" is going well fantasizing about the positive things generates sexual responses and endorfins etc.
Dwelling on the negatives does not and so creates a "withdrawl"
syndrome.
Much like an opiate withdrawl.
Heartbreak usually means no more sex as well, so bye bye to those endorfins as well.

Time heals all wounds so they say.
As time passes the thoughts become less focused on the heartbreak because fresh stimuli supercede the previous negatives and the body's
reaction changes accordingly.
Thus laughter IS a good cure.
Laughter and time and other thoughts.
Oh yeah....
Getting fucked into a coma ( even better by the x's best friend) works pretty good too.
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/damned.gif" alt="Damned" title="damned" />
After all that wonderfully pertinent information, I think I like this tidbit the best:

Quote:Getting fucked into a coma ( even better by the x's best friend) works pretty good too.

Wub
Chocolate, forgot to mention chocolate! It helps a lot.
*sigh*
Time, laughter, chocolate... Cheers
sometimes I even wonder what the hell I ever needed romance for in the first place...
...till I get that landed on by a piano from the 19th floor feeling.
I'm not searching for a cure at this point. I just found it interesting that it was SO SPECIFIC to that exact area. I'd never felt that before. Now that it isn't constant 24/7 it is even more obvious, because I can have a thought that will remind me of some horrible aspect of this situation, and I can feel the constriction and "death" feeling immediately. I call it death, because it feels like my heart died - as if it isn't even working any more, even though I know it is. Maybe heaviness is a better word, but that doesn't portray the not working part.

Valentine - please do keep us posted on anything else pertinent you find in your reading.
Like the hollow feeling you get when a knife is pulled out of a deep stab wound.
I'll have to take your word on that one Wahya, but the imagery is good.
Quote:...why did they start calling it a Broken Heart to start with? Why is it so precisely located and related to that specific type of experience?

There are "neural networks" of varying complexity...ranging from ganglia...to structures like the solar plexus...to the spinal cord...to the brain.

Heartrate and blood pressure ultimately determine the efficient flow of ions to the nervous system...etc...etc......

I imagine there must be a type of memory linked in a feedback loop with the peripheral nervous system. This would afford immediate action in times of acute interactions with the environment. The heartrate is regulated by a "chaotic oscillator" which is able to phaseshift to a certain extent. This is important because it can raise the level of electrical resonance...and therefore speed of response.

Obviously the connections are complex.

Pain......Pleasure

Whip
I am glad that the vagus is of interest - I have been researching it for around 17 years. The right vagus controls heart rate, acting as a brake (parasympathetic) whereas the spinal cord (sympathetic) tends to speed the heart. Strong vagal stimulation can slow the heart dangerously. Stimulation of the left vagus is used to reverse epilepsy, and some papers suggest that left vagal stimulation can act as an analgesic.

I had the honour of meeting Professor Stephen Porges a couple of years ago, and recommend searching on his "Polyvagal theory" which explains a lot about stress and emotions linked to the vagus.

I agree that the oscillators are all important. Some of the most important are in the "vagal complex" of the brainstem, located in the medulla oblongata.

Thanks for making me welcome.
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