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a book I just finished reading. About a 14 year old girl who gets murdered in a cornfield on her way home from 8th grade and her experiences in heaven and earth.

She spoke that when you died-your soul just rushed out and they could see them swarming out from their vantage point in heaven. Those who had been murdered appeared awash in red-

The narrator-Susie-was able to watch and even involve a bit-her friends and family down below. She was eager to have her loved ones know and catch her killer of which the book detailed very well.

An incredible book about the dead and the living and the lines that get crossed all the time.

<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/cheers.gif" alt="Cheers" title="cheers" />
Reminds me of the true story of the person who got a heart transplanted from a murdered girl. The recipient identified the killer from the heart's memories.
Quote:Reminds me of the true story of the person who got a heart transplanted from a murdered girl. The recipient identified the killer from the heart's memories.

Creepy ....sheezus
What story is that?!!
It was an article in a UK paper about peeps who got some of the memories and personality characteristics of the previous owners of their transplanted hearts. Sometimes they experienced the memories in dreams.
oh good, a movie's been made of this great story-and the casting sounds very right on to me-

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0380510/fullcredits

how funny that sexy Susan Sarandon is playing the funtastic role of the Grandma...

this story is set in 1973... and rolls throughout the 70s, I think it goes on for 7 years.
I was just going to say, I think I saw that movie.
Just moderate creepy, not fully creepy as I remember.
Quote:It was an article in a UK paper about peeps who got some of the memories and personality characteristics of the previous owners of their transplanted hearts. Sometimes they experienced the memories in dreams.

I have heard about that, transplanted organs giving personality traits to the recieving person. I had not heard about memories though. Does anyone have anything else on this? I am somewhat cautious when it just comes from a singular article, on the other hand the personality traits was part of documented stories, cant remember whether it was actual research though into it.
Cellular Memory in Organ Transplants
Leslie A. Takeuchi, BA, PTA
http://www.med.unc.edu/wellness/main/li ... memory.htm

In my experience as a physical therapist assistant, I have come to acknowledge the relevance of thoughts, emotions and spiritual beliefs to healing. I recognize the art of physical therapy to be based upon empirical science and a dualism which views the mind and body as separate, thus drawing a sharp distinction between sensory experiences and physical reality, between subject and object, between mind and matter and between soul and body. However, I also recognize that even though my science provides a rational foundation, it does not allow for the importance of the subjectivity and wholeness I see in my patients whose bodies and minds are inseparable.

In my work with the chronic pain population, I have taken a closer look at this relationship of mind and matter, body and emotions, for keys to how people heal. In this search, I looked into theories of emotions or memories being somehow stored in the tissues of the body and later manifesting in the physical form of pain or disease. What was most striking were the numerous reports of organ transplant recipients who later experienced changes in personality traits, tastes for food, music, activities and even sexual preference. Is it possible that our memories reside deep inside our bodily cells in addition to in our minds?

Current understandings about memory, for example, place this mental capacity solely as a function of the brain. However, the process of memory may be too complex to be explained by measuring brain activity through electroencephalograms or oxygen uptake as recorded on PET scans. Looking at memory as part of the quantum world of sub-atomic systems gives the visual image of tiny specks whizzing around every which way until there is a need for them to come together into some sort of pattern of awareness. But, where do the memories reside?

Candace Pert, author of Molecules of Emotion: Why You Feel the Way You Feel, says, "Memories are stored not only in the brain, but in a psychosomatic network extending into the body . . . all the way out along pathways to internal organs and the very surface of our skin." After having discovered neuropeptides in all body tissues, Pert suggests that through cellular receptors, thoughts or memories may remain unconscious or can become conscious-raising the possibility of physiological connections between memories, organs and the mind.

University of Arizona scientists and co-authors of The Living Energy Universe, Gary Schwartz, PhD, and Linda Russek, PhD, propose the universal living memory hypothesis in which they believe that "all systems stored energy dynamically . . . and this information continued as a living, evolving system after the physical structure had deconstructed." Schwartz and Russek believe this may explain how the information and energy from the donor's tissue can be present, consciously or unconsciously, in the recipient.

Paul Pearsall, MD, a psychoneuroimmunologist and author of The Heart's Code, has researched the transference of memories through organ transplantation. After interviewing nearly 150 heart and other organ transplant recipients, Pearsall proposes the idea that cells of living tissue have the capacity to remember.

Together with Schwartz and Russek, Pearsall conducted a study, published in the Spring 2002 issue of the Journal of Near-Death Studies, entitled, "Changes in Heart Transplant Recipients That Parallel the Personalities of Their Donors." The study consisted of open-ended interviews with 10 heart or heart-lung transplant recipients, their families or friends and the donor's families or friends. The researchers reported striking parallels in each of the cases. The following is a sampling of some these.

In one case, an 18-year-old boy who wrote poetry, played music and composed songs, was killed in an automobile accident. A year after he died his parents came across an audiotape of a song he had written, entitled, "Danny, My Heart is Yours," which was about how he "felt he was destined to die and give his heart to someone." The donor recipient "Danny" of his heart, was an 18-year-old girl, named Danielle. When she met the donor's parents, they played some of his music and she, despite never having heard the song, was able to complete the phrases.

In another case, a seven-month-old boy received a heart from a 16-month-old boy who had drowned. The donor had a mild form of cerebral palsy mostly on the left side. The recipient, who did not display such symptoms prior to the transplant, developed the same stiffness and shaking on the left side.

A 47-year-old Caucasian male received a heart from a 17-year-old African-American male. The recipient was surprised by his new-found love of classical music. What he discovered later was that the donor, who loved classical music and played the violin, had died in a drive-by shooting, clutching his violin case to his chest.

A 29-year-old lesbian and a fast food junkie received a heart from a 19-year-old woman vegetarian who was "man crazy." The recipient reported after her operation that meat made her sick and she was no longer attracted to women. If fact, she became engaged to marry a man.

A 47-year-old man received a heart from a 14-year-old girl gymnast who had problems with eating disorders. After the transplant, the recipient and his family reported his tendency to be nauseated after eating, a childlike exuberance and a little girl's giggle.

Aside from those included in the study, there are other transplant recipients whose stories are worth mentioning, such as Claire Sylvia, a woman who received a heart-lung transplant. In her book entitled, A Change of Heart: A Memoir, Ms. Sylvia describes her own journey from being a healthy, active dancer to becoming ill and eventually needing a heart transplant. After the operation, she reported peculiar changes like cravings for beer and chicken nuggets, neither of which she had a taste for prior to the transplant. She later discovered that these were favorites of her donor. She even learned that her donor had chicken nuggets in his jacket pocket when he died in a motorcycle accident.

Another possible incidence of memory transfer occurred when a young man came out of his transplant surgery and said to his mother, "everything is copasetic." His mother said that he had never used that word before, but now used it all the time. It was later discovered that the word had been a signal, used by the donor and his wife, particularly after an argument, so that when they made up they knew everything was okay. The donor's wife reported that they had had an argument just before the donor's fatal accident and had never made up.

Another amazing story, reported by Pearsall, is that of an eight-year-old girl who received the heart of a ten-year-old girl who had been murdered. After the transplant, the recipient had horrifying nightmares of a man murdering her donor. The dreams were so traumatic that psychiatric help was sought. The girl's images were so specific that the psychiatrist and the mother notified the police. According to the psychiatrist, ". . .using the description from the little girl, they found the murderer. He was easily convicted with the evidence the patient provided. The time, weapon, place, clothes he wore, what the little girl he killed had said to him . . . everything the little heart transplant recipient had reported was completely accurate."

Although medical science is not yet ready to embrace the ideas of cellular memory, one surgeon believes there must be something to it. Mehmet Oz, MD, heart surgeon at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, has invited an energy healer, Julie Motz, into the operating room during transplant surgery. Initially, Motz practiced energy healing to help reduce anxiety prior to surgery and depression following surgery. Then the team noticed that there seemed to be less incidence of rejection in these patients. They were curious to see what would happen if she were present during the operation. Motz registers, through sensations in her own body, the emotional state of the patient during the surgical procedure. Through her touch or words, Motz attempts to alleviate any worries, fears or anger the patient may be experiencing. She works with the recipient's ability to accept the new organ and also works with the donated tissue so it will accept a new body. The results have been favorable, and the team reports reduced rejection and increased survival rates. This may sound outrageous to those who never thought about tissues having feelings or caring about where they would reside, but Dr. Oz believes that it would be a disservice to ignore even the possibility that this method could help.

More studies are being conducted with regard to the phenomenon of organ recipient and donor coincidences. Pearsall, Schwartz and Russek report that, "research is underway at the University of Arizona on a sample of more than 300 transplant patients to determine the incidence of such transcendent memory phenomena using semi-structured interviews and systematic questions."

Intriguing questions remain. What percentage of transplant recipients actually do feel changes in behavior and personality or report changes in food preference or have new memories? Is there a higher incidence of tissue or organ acceptance in those patients who are aware of their consciousness or who have energy work done? Will ordinary science offer more evidence to support that memories are transferred-or will we need a new science? Perhaps more importantly, what does this transcendent phenomenon have to tell us about other healing events?

Leslie A. Takeuchi, BA, PTA is a physical therapist assistant and is currently a graduate student in Holistic Health Education at John. F. Kennedy University in Orinda, California. An article about Julie Motz's energy healing work appeared in the June/July issue of San Francisco Medicine in 2000. Her book, "Hand of Life" was published by Bantam Books in 1998.
excellent article, thanks for finding it SJ.

there is also research involving the 'heart brain', something like that-with the heart being the center of our existence organ wise-like the 'follow your heart' mentalities.

I'm surprised that there are so many heart transplants being successfully performed.

And the little girl with the murdered girl's heart telling her what happened is outrageous. I bet she feels like she's been through all of it for a good reason.

and the energy healer in the OR is excellent too-there usually isn't any kind of therapy pre or post operations regardless of how physically or emotionally traumatizing they are to the sufferer. That's a big step in the right direction.
Yes, and it's recently been suggested that the heart, as well as other parts of the body experience emotions, or are responsible for some emotions.

Sick with fear and heart-broken come to mind.
hi Trevor!

that's where Louise Hayes got into her premise that emotions cause ALL of our diseases, or allow them to take hold, by being a volunteer at a big hospital and hearing of so many of the heart patients having gone through quite the traumas heart wise prior to their 'heart problems'. Divorces, deaths, loss of loved ones really pounds the nails in and even now there is little to no therapies available to mend a broken heart-emotionally.

and ROLFING and other body works are done to release held emotions-engrams-and I've never had that done but have known ones that did and they said it did work that way-tender pieces of our flesh with traumatic emotional issues trapped in the tissues. some how.

very interesting and hallowed grounds the scientists and doctors are treading on-glad to know that they're cognizant of what they're doing and the effects upon the people involved.
Quote:hi Trevor!

that's where Louise Hayes got into her premise that emotions cause ALL of our diseases, or allow them to take hold, by being a volunteer at a big hospital and hearing of so many of the heart patients having gone through quite the traumas heart wise prior to their 'heart problems'. Divorces, deaths, loss of loved ones really pounds the nails in and even now there is little to no therapies available to mend a broken heart-emotionally.

and ROLFING and other body works are done to release held emotions-engrams-and I've never had that done but have known ones that did and they said it did work that way-tender pieces of our flesh with traumatic emotional issues trapped in the tissues. some how.

very interesting and hallowed grounds the scientists and doctors are treading on-glad to know that they're cognizant of what they're doing and the effects upon the people involved.

Hi S, got any links on this?

I've seen it suggested before that emotions can be trapped within a part of the body, be it particular muscles whatever. A 'healer' once asked me if I forced my emotions into my calf muscles, I thought she was crazy!!
Notice they don't include blood transfusions, I guess that's because blood is replaced for new stock?
Quote:[quote author="the gardener"]hi Trevor!

that's where Louise Hayes got into her premise that emotions cause ALL of our diseases, or allow them to take hold, by being a volunteer at a big hospital and hearing of so many of the heart patients having gone through quite the traumas heart wise prior to their 'heart problems'. Divorces, deaths, loss of loved ones really pounds the nails in and even now there is little to no therapies available to mend a broken heart-emotionally.

and ROLFING and other body works are done to release held emotions-engrams-and I've never had that done but have known ones that did and they said it did work that way-tender pieces of our flesh with traumatic emotional issues trapped in the tissues. some how.

very interesting and hallowed grounds the scientists and doctors are treading on-glad to know that they're cognizant of what they're doing and the effects upon the people involved.

Hi S, got any links on this?



I've seen it suggested before that emotions can be trapped within a part of the body, be it particular muscles whatever. A 'healer' once asked me if I forced my emotions into my calf muscles, I thought she was crazy!![/quote]

Not crazy at all, it is the truth and any number of techniques to release the impacted emotion really works

No link but offer an explanation with names for your future reference, sorry kind of long..

For Reich the muscular system is the site of repression, and the sum of all these muscular tensions constituted a person's visible character structure.

Freud believed that the crucial event during a patient's psychoanalysis was when his unconscious memories and emotions are released from repression, giving him not only new insight but also relief from emotional tension. This two-fold therapeutic event is neatly psychophysiological: the gain in understanding is psychic and the relief from tension is physiological.

It was the role of Freud's disciple, Wilhelm Reich, to make psychoanalysis more concrete than Freud by seeing the terms “unconscious,” “repression,” “character,” and “catharsis” in terms of the body. Reich saw repression not as a psychic activity but as a somatic event — namely, that the muscles in those parts of the body touched by certain experiences would contract and remain so indefinitely, preventing the person from becoming aware of these experiences. For Reich the muscular system is the site of repression, and the sum of all these muscular tensions constituted a person's visible character structure. Each person's body, says Reich, has its own characteristic muscle armor, whose tensions restrict his body movement, reduce his emotional life and bar from his awareness certain types of memories. However, if the therapist can release the hold of this muscular armor, catharsis can take place, restoring suppleness to the person's body and emotions, and allowing his repressed memories to become conscious again.

Reich saw somatic healing as a needed addition to Freudian psychoanalysis which helps the patient gain insight primarily through verbal therapy. Before the patient could succeed in a talking therapy like psychoanalysis, said Reich, he should go through the non-verbal treatment of muscular release. Then, in a more relaxed and comfortable state, the patient would be better prepared for self-understanding.

Reich believed passionately that his somatic view of psychoanalysis fulfilled Freud's ideas. He did not treat the idea of libido as a metaphor, but viewed it as the immediate experience that people have of pleasurable streamings within their bodies. A free flow of these libidinal streamings, said Reich, is the sign of pleasurable health. When these streamings are bound by muscular armor, the person is unhealthy; this limits his sexual pleasure and keeps him from full orgasm. Reich was convinced that a neurotic person lacks the potency for complete sexual orgasm.

Central to Reich's therapy were the techniques he devised to rid the body of muscular armor. Quite unlike his psychoanalytic colleagues, he touched his patients, manipulating their skeleton and pressing their musculature. He also made clever use of the body's involuntary reflexes. For example, one way of getting a patient's diaphragm to relax and let him breath more deeply is to have a patient stick his finger down his throat to elicit the gag reflex. This uses an unconscious mechanism to affect muscles that we otherwise cannot control by our voluntary efforts.

Bioenergetics is Alexander Lowen's term for his extension of Reich's work. A prolific as well as lucid writer, Lowen has become the principle spokesman for the Reichean viewpoint. The tribe is large, and Reicheans under many names —vegetotherapists, orgonomists, neo-Reicheans, bioenergeticists — have scattered throughout Europe and America. Lowen and his longtime colleague, John Pierrakos, practiced and trained others together in New York. Stanley Keleman brought the Reichean tradition to the West Coast.

Forcibly stretching the fascia is somewhat painful, and this intense pressure on certain muscles causes many people to suddenly remember or relive painful incidents from their past.

All of these somatic healers are medical doctors (except for Keleman who was trained in chiropractic) who share the medical commitment to rid the patient of his offending symptom. But the Reichean healers try to do so by ridding him of muscular “blocks” that prevent free flow of energy. Reicheans take the metaphor of “blocks” in a concrete way and believe that the release and free flow of what they call bioenergy is the best state of health, and their somatic therapy is designed to bring about exactly this state.

The success of the Reicheans in bringing about a relief from chronic tension may be seen in terms that are different from the ways in which they describe their work. The celebrated neurophysiologist, Ernst Gellhorn provides a way of looking at Reichean catharsis that is, perhaps, less metaphorical.

Gellhorn distinguishes between two phases of activity in the nervous system: the ergotropic (during which the organism is under the stress of producing work and energy) and the trophotropic phase (during which the organism rests, sleeps, recuperates its energy and rebuilds tissue). Normally, when the ergotropic phase of tense activity is over there is a “rebound effect” that swings the nervous system into the trophotropic, recuperative stage. However, if a human lives a life of constant and unremitting stress —as is typical of much of contemporary life— the rebound effect never has a chance to assert itself. And the person remains in an unrelieved ergotropic state of tension and stress.

Given this situation, what is needed is an accentuation of the stressful ergotropic state so intensely that the rebound effect is finally triggered. When this is done, the person is sprung free from the depleting influence of the chronic stress state and is suddenly released into the calm, replenishing trophotropic state. The techniques of the Reicheans and the effects on their patients suggest that something like this is what takes place.

A parallel to the Reichean tradition is the pioneering work of Ida Rolf who has elaborated a technique that eliminates muscular blocks from the body. Her system is called Structural Integration — or, more popularly, Rolfing. Rolfing is not therapy in the strict sense but a general treatment that is the same for each client. Rolf has devised a series of ten sessions of deep muscular massage, each session concentrating on certain sets of muscles that are essential in standing upright. The massage is designed to free the muscles from the constraint of the tight fascial membranes that cover and connect muscle. Freed of this restraint, the muscles automatically have a wider range of movement. The ten sessions allow a person's core musculature to work with his skeleton, rather than against its support, in balancing against the force of gravity. It also leaves a person's body more supple: many people who have never been able to touch their toes do so for the first time after Structural Integration.

Like the Reicheans, Rolf seeks to rid a person's body of what constrains it. The treatment is forceful; Rolfers use sheer hand power to stress and extend the muscle fascia. Forcibly stretching the fascia is somewhat painful, and this intense pressure on certain muscles causes many people to suddenly remember or relive painful incidents from their past.

Other therapies use stress and pain to achieve a catharsis. Janov’s primal therapy and its proliferation of offshoots use stress or deliberately painful deep muscle massage to force a patient's catharsis — often with screams, sobs and hysterics.

A different approach to somatic healing is psychodrama, developed by the Viennese psychiatrist, J.L. Moreno who came to the United States during the 1930s. Moreno saw psychodrama as an extension of psychoanalysis where the patient acts out emotionally charged relationships, alternately playing himself and other family members. Psychodrama has itself spawned offshoots in Fritz Perls’ Gestalt therapy and Eric Berne’s Transactional Analysis and Albert and Diane Pesso’s Psychomotor therapy. The most physical of these, Psychomotor therapy, has patients express emotions as if in a mini-drama, e.g., flailing in anger at a pillow while a helper acts out the role of a neglecting parent

Parallel to this is acupuncture (ancient) and any number of modalities that have of spin off the seminal works of those noted above. I personally would suggest reading Reich, snip below.

Function of the orgasm...

Quote:THE BODY'S OUTWARD APPEARANCE IS AN ACCURATE REFLECTION OF WHAT'S HAPPENING INSIDE, said Reich. There is a basic mistake in idea, "I think,...I am." You can't change your thoughts at a basic level without change in your body, in what you do.

* Reich wanted a full-body emotional response to life. If you cover yourself up, may deaden pain, but also rob yourself of full joy.
* When someone inhibits an impulse they feel tension. Inhibited libido is tense muscles, sexual charm is relaxed muscles.

FUNCTIONS OF MUSCULAR ARMOR:

* KEEPS POTENTIALLY EXPLOSIVE EMOTIONS IN
* WARDS OFF EMOTIONS OF OTHERS.
* Reich noticed men have trouble taking away armor because they are so accustomed to suppressing feelings and emotions. \
* An armored person does not feel their armor as such. Reich believed that mind-body work is necessary for people to rid themselves of this armor.
* BODY ARMOR AND CHARACTER ARMOR are essentially the same. Their function is trying to protect yourself against the pain of notexpressing things that society says you may not express. Muscular armor is character armor expressed in body, muscular rigidity.
* Armoring is the sum total of the muscular attitudes which a person develops as a defense against the breakthrough of emotions, especially anxity, rage, sexual excitation. Character armor is the sum total of all the years of the muscular attituded that have also been incorporated in the person's character.

CHARACTER ARMOR CAN BE REFLECTED IN LIFE-PATTERNS. Karen Horney, reflecting on Reich's work, noted that people may arrange their lives to fit their character armor. Thus a severely introverted person may find an apartment in a building that is so configured that he or she need not meet or interact with neighbors, and shop at impersonal stores where minimal contact with others is necessary.

AGGRESSION:
Direct correlation betwen inhibition of aggression and byd armor. Mood-blocked patients-- "stiff as a board" In therapy when he would get person to relax some, an anxiety would take the place of the stiffnes, and for many people, the stiffness was preferable to the anxiety. Holding back like that blocks awareness. Arkoring can lead to cancer, arthritis, rheumatism.
THE LONGER THE ARMOR GOES ON, INSTINCT SUPPRESSED, THE MORE PSYCHOSOMATIC PROBLEMS ITS LIKELY TO LEAD TO

RINGS

Blocks are the contractions in the organsism which prevent the free flow of energy. It appeared to Reich that these appear as rings at a number of points in the body.

1. OCULAR. Forehead, eyes, cheekbones, tear duct glands. Inability to open eyes wide. Treatment: Get people to open their eyes "really wide like they're scared."

2. ORAL. Lips, chin, throat. Person may find it hard to cry, grin, grimace at all.

3. NECK: When armoned, holding back crying, anger.

4. CHEST: Major function--self-control, restraint. Ex: suppressed spite. Holding back anger. Tight muscles holding back raving rage, heartbreaking solbbing, intolerable longing. The armored peerson is unable to express thos things.

With someone armored in chest areas -- hands and arms may move very awkwardly.Example of being free of this armor: musician or dancer who moves in very fluid way. Armor in head and chest-- often found in militarism. Militarism based on armoring and vice-versa. In women, armoring can result in insensitivity in nipples, disgust at nursing.

5. DIAPHRAGM.

6. ABDOMINAL CONTRACTIONS

7. PELVIC REGION. When excitement reaches a place that is blocked, the pleasure that comes from the flowing of the energy turns into rage. Might have muscular spasms. Emphasis on vigorous expression of anger, rage, crying, other emotions. We can function as a whole unit when the armor is removed. Focus on breaking up the inhibitions.

Reich would work with the seven regions of the body to dissolve resistance. The resistance is what we build up throughout our life to block affect. In Reich's day, the newborn infant was immediately bundled up very tightly to restrict movement. Reich takes each developmental stage and shows how society forbids certain kinds of expression of energy. \Example: in early toilet training, people are taught to tighten up, restrict.

In masturbation, "Don't touch that dirty little finger or it will fall off." All along, parental teaching is stopping the natural flow of energy. Inside excitement is building up like a pressure cooker. I'm angry but not allowed to be angry. Can't express things like we want. "I"m mad as hell. I want to touch my little thing and it's not going to fall off." We develop armoring to stop this flow of energy.



SEXUALITY AND ARMORING. As a result of armoring, the sexual impulse is changed from something soft and gentle to something harsh and brutal. Inability to express sexuality causes rage, which must also be repressed, and then sex becomes mechanical and brutal.

* One manifiestation: pelvis pulled back, thing and buttock muscles tight. Therapeutic goal: to dissolve the armoring, both muscular and character.

* People could perform the act but not necessarily feel the pleasure associated with it. Freud never talked about sexual experiences in adult life. Always went back to childhood. At the time it was thought that if man could ejaculate and woman could show any interest or pleasure at all they were doing OK.

ORGIASTIC POTENCY: Ability to surrender to the flow without any inhibition. Complete surrender to the sexual act. "This is always lacking in neurotic individuals." Few people mature with complete orgiastic potency. Full orgasm can only happen in 4 ways, held Reich:

1. If people love each other and can express this love
2. When both people are free of armor, then involuntary muscular movements occur before climax
3. Breathing should be deep, full, pleasurable
4. Shortly before orgasm both sexes should experience deep, delicious current-like sensations running up and down bodies. Armoriing cuts this off. Otherwise, climax in loins only. Not throughout body.

Reich saw ability to lose ourselves in sexual ecstasy as the ultimate measure of well being.

NEUROTIC SEXUALITY: Sexual discharge leaves people empty, unsatisfied, not fully at peace. For Reich, ejaculation alone, or a small climax by the woman, was not enough to be called an orgasm. It required ca complete release of exicitation. Many men boasted of now many times they could do it a night but were limited in the pleasure they got, while women were filled with conflict and guilt.

* Reich saw sexual energy as in two parts. Buildup and release. Charge and discharge.
* He held that NEUROSIS IS NONE OTHER THAN THE SUM TOTAL OF ALL CHRONICALLY AUTOMATIC INHIBITIONS OF NATURAL SEXUAL EXCITATION, AND EVERYTHING ELSE IS THE RESULT OF THIS ORIGINAL DISTURBANCE.
* STASIS: A damming-up of sexual energy in the organism. Stasis = neurosis. Sexual stasis is the difference between the energy built up and the amount released during orgasm. This leftover energy, undischarged, feeds the inhibition which is hindering sexual release and pleasure, and the inhibition in turn adds to the sexual stasis. A vicious circle. That, for Reich, was the energy source of neurosis.
* ESSENTIAL: Ability to give and receive love in all its forms The full orgiastic reflex is a sign that the person is free of body armoring. Reich's goal was to RESTORE THE PRIMACY OF OUR SENSUAL NATURE. To really let go during the sexual experience. Not just an orgasm but a complete, full release.



In other words fuck freely <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/cheers.gif" alt="Cheers" title="cheers" />
Quote:Central to Reich's therapy were the techniques he devised to rid the body of muscular armor.
Back in the day, my DIY therapy was 3 hits of blotter. It was a great way to shed all the muscular tensions by way of mental inventory.
Quote:[quote author="hrm"]Central to Reich's therapy were the techniques he devised to rid the body of muscular armor.
Back in the day, my DIY therapy was 3 hits of blotter. It was a great way to shed all the muscular tensions by way of mental inventory.[/quote]


Most of those mentioned above would tend to agree with you, course they were all hanning together and hanging with Stanislav Grof, the guy who developed Holotropic Therapy, later called (sans the LSD) Holotropic breathwork. No doubt why Lilly was so taken with the idea as well.

The lunch table during that time period at Esalen was a pretty heady group to dine with. Almost all the people I mentioned in the post above, with the exception of Reich himself were present, as were many others who really have become the seminal players/seeders of this time period. Really quite wild thinking back retrospectively after all this time. Even Sagen was there then, I thought he was quite a pompous ass, now I wished I would have talked to him more <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/dunno.gif" alt="Dunno" title="dunno" />

As for Stanislav...

He started his career as a medical doctor working in a psychiatric clinical setting, in his homeland of Czechoslovakia. There, in 1956, he joined the Psychiatric Research Institute of Prague, researching into psychedelic (meaning psyche revealing) drug use, using normal volunteers as control groups and schizophrenic patients as experimental groups, and applying a standardised set of examinations and tests. This team looked for the differences in effect between psychoactive drugs such as Lysergic Acid (LSD), mescaline and psilocybin. Grof did not share the growing view at that time that LSD­induced states were simply an unspecific brain reaction to a noxious substance (Grof, 1970c). In particular, to support his stand, there was the enormous range of responses he had observed. The classical description of an LSD session just did not fit everyone, and he began to see a psychodynamic association.

He sought to relate the phenomenology of the LSD experience to the personality of the subject, allowing for biographical data and the current life situation. In this work he did in Prague, he generated a large data base. Analysis of these data, arising from his work with his patients, indicated the highly specific relationship between LSD and subjects. What was needed was a formal understanding of the specific effects and symbolic language involved.

For most of Grof's patients one LSD session gave temporary relief of symptoms but, in the main, there was little permanent change. Over several sessions, however, with the same patient, there appeared a continuity which represented a successive unfolding of deeper and deeper levels of the unconscious. In particular, memories seemed to be relived (Grof, 1972). Grof adopted the term psycholytic therapy, a term which was coined by Sandison (Sandison et al, 1954), where lytic suggests dissolving or releasing tensions and conflicts. The LSD dose was optimised over several sessions (usually 200 micrograms, but sometimes as much as 500). Only low doses were needed for hysterics, but high doses were needed for obsessive­compulsives (Grof, 1972). The techniques in his therapeutic sessions were developed over a period of time, where these involved the support, supervision, safety measures, use of music and staff training. Important was not only what happened during sessions, but the dynamics of the post­session changes.

In 1967, Grof left Czechoslovakia to work in the United States of America, continuing his work at Spring Grove, in Baltimore, Maryland, at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Centre, where controlled LSD studies were being conducted. There the approach was different, where the goal was the facilitation of deep religio­mystical experiences (sometimes at the expense of the underlying psychodynamic issues: Pahnke & Richards, 1969; Grof, 1972). The doses were very high (500) and only three sessions were involved. This approach was called psychedelic therapy, where psychedelic means manifesting or revealing the psyche.

At the time Grof joined the Baltimore team, more than twenty five years had elapsed since the discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (known also as d­lysergic acid or LSD­25) by the Swiss chemist Hofmann in 1943. At the time of that 50s, the International Association for Psychodelytic Therapy was formed, and in 1959 an international conference on the uses of LSD in psychotherapy was held in New York City.

The safety issue was addressed in 1960, when Cohen demonstrated that the risks were minimal (Cohen, 1960). Cohen's finding has more recently been supported (Strassman, 1984). Dramatic treatment effects were claimed, but many studies were methodologically flawed, and later research showed that these induced states differed markedly from real psychosis in many respects (Pahnke & Richards, 1969).

Two other areas of LSD use at that time was in producing aesthetic experiences, and in inducing religious­mystical experiences (Panhke & Richards, 1969). Both aroused fierce controversy, especially that of the possibility of chemical or instant mysticism. There were those who stood against such claims, because of the implications for the array of long­term practices used by mystics and meditators to achieve mystical states. But there were also those for whom such claims supported their aim to remove all such mystical experiences from the sacred to the profane (Clark, 1969).

A further dimension was added when young people started using LSD in an uncontrolled way in the mid 1960s, which took the debate from purely scientific circles into the social and political arenas (Lee & Schlain, 1986). Two widely divergent groups emerged: those who saw LSD as humankind's saviour and those who saw it threatening the societal infrastructure (supported by sensation­hungry press reports). The Hippie movement added yet anothe dimension. Finally, there was the fear that LSD caused chromosomal damage and cancer (Cohen 1960). But, for Grof, lying at the root of all these issues was the fact that LSD acted as an amplifier of mental processes that brought to the surface deep levels of the unconscious (Grof; 1972, 1973, 1975).

LSD is the most powerful psychoactive drug known, producing effects with as little as 10 micrograms (Di Leo, 1975­76; Stafford, 1983). After application, there is a latency period (10 minutes to 3 hours), unless administered directly into the cerebrospinal fluid where the effect is immediate. The session or trip can last between 4 to 12 hours. The experience is mediated by dose level. Activity during the session is also a mediating factor. If the subject is moving about with eyes open the effect is reduced. If lying supine with eyes closed, the effect is heightened. Listening to music during the session also has a heightening effect. There are both sympathetic (eg, accelerated pulse rate) and parasympathetic (eg, lowered blood pressure) symptoms. There are also general symptoms (eg, flu like) and motoric phenomena (eg, jerking limbs). There are perceptual changes, most often visual, but also with hypersensitivity to sound. There are also olfactory­gustatory changes. In addition, there are spatio­temporal diortions, including regression to earlier parts of the participant's individual history. Emotional changes appear very early, with euphoria being common, but ranging across all possible emotions. Cognitive processes are also altered (eg, speeded up), and there may be insights or problem resolutions. In general, however, there is an overall impairment of mental efficiency.

Usually, there is a very clear memory of the session because there is usually none of the confusion­disorientation seen with the use of other drugs. Libido may be completely suppressed or greatly amplified (usually with a perverse strain ­­ sadomasochistic). Aesthetic experiences are common, especially of music, and these can persist long after the session. The same is true of religio­mystical experiences (Pahnke & Richards, 1969; Grof; 1972, 1973 & 1975; Richards et al, 1972).

Grof's earlier clinical experience in Prague with LSD entailed some 2500 LSD sessions. He also had access to records of over 1300 sessions run by others in the Baltimore team. The clinical subjects had a wide variety of disorders. As in Grof's Czechoslovakian researches, there were also a wide range of normals (nurses, doctors, students, artists and so on). These large amounts of data completely refuted the earlier notion that there was some typical mandatory pharmacological effect (Grof, 1972; 1973; 1975). The Baltimore team found that there was no single symptom that was truly invariant across the 3800 LSD sessions. Even optical changes (the most likely candidate for the noxious effect theory ­­ Cohen, 1960) did not fit. This included pupillary dilation, where sometimes even constriction was noted. This is not to say that LSD has no physiological effects (the very high doses used in animal research show this; Pahnke & Richards, 1960). Dose sensitivity depended on complex psychological factors rather than obiological variables (Grof, 1972; 1973). But within the dose levels used for humans, the physical manifestations are not the direct result of pharmacological stimulation of the central nervous system. The records of these psycholytic sessions became the basis of Grof's assumptions and theorising. Grof came to see LSD acting as a catalyst, activating unconscious material (Grof; 1972, 1973 & 1975).

Grof found that the degree of sensitivity to dose depended on complicated psychological factors, rather than on biological variables. Those diagnosed as overcontrolled in everyday life exhibited high resistance to LSD and showed few symptoms. So too with those who had set out to resist the effects of LSD as a challenge. Obsessive­compulsives, too, were found to have high resistance. In terms of dose level, effect saturation seemed to occur at around 500 micrograms (Grof, 1972; 1973; 1975).

Grof found that the real effect of LSD was that of a powerful unspecific amplifier­catalyst, creating undifferentiated activation facilitating the emergence of unconscious material from different levels of the personality. The maps or cartographies that Grof has identified (Grof, 1975, 1985, 1988) seem to be fully compatible­parallel with other therapeutic systems. Grof has developed four levels or types of LSD experience to explore the topic, but insists that such delineations are artificial (Grof, 1975). The levels he evolved and still uses are; abstract­aesthetic; psychodynamic; perinatal and transpersonal.

Grof now calls his technique holotropic (moving towards wholeness) therapy (or holonomic integration), and no longer relies on psychoactive drugs to induce the deep experiential states his therapy requires (Grof, 1985; 1988).

Now he uses breath.

http://www.geocities.com/hotsprings/vil ... /Grof.html
wow wow wow excellent Reichian/Freud post. Reich was such an incredible integrator of huge amounts of realities-about the ENERGIES.

about time for a Reichian revisitation of his massive amounts of materials. So many if not most, need this type of loosening and healing therapies.

Body language is so revealing-it is so easy to see where we have our armor. This allopathic med system has got to be replaced asap by those working at the healings.

Of course in Reich's case, his works were all confiscated by the government and he ended up in prison-that's what happens to the wise ones in this society. Or rather, used to happen to them, the time for change is present again.
I posted this in Mayito7777's thread in the News department but since it is about the surviving whales' 'dying of broken hearts' and 'giving up their will to live due to loneliness' it's appropriate here too... just isn't we humans suffering on this planet!

]I was pleasured with a great conversation with a junior high science teacher last week-we were talking 'bout evolution v creationism and I'm confiding I don't 'believe' in either one and he made the most profound statement I've ever heard anyone make "I don't think humans are even native to this planet-look at what our native instincts cause us to do! (gesturing towards a human structure) we are totally out of synch in every way with every other species on this planet'.

Crying

Lonely whales are 'losing the will to live' due to over hunting

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 8:15 PM on 22nd June 2008

The steeply declining number of whales in the world's oceans is causing the remaining creatures to suffer loneliness and 'lose the will the live', a leading expert has claimed.

The psychological impact of over-hunting on the highly intelligent and sociable animals has been identified as the latest threat to the survival of the species.

The whale population has already fallen dramatically over the past few centuries because to culling by Japan, Norway and Iceland, and the poisoning of oceans which kills off their food.
Humpback whale mother and calf

[Image: article-0-01ABD49700000578-151_468x286.jpg]
Whales could be extinct within decades

But now a French scientist has said the majestic mammals - which can reach 80ft in length and weigh the same as a passenger jet - could also suffer from heartbreak.

Paris naturalist Yves Paccalet said: 'It may be that these intelligent animals are so exhausted from their combat with humankind that they have simply have given up the fight.

'And the psychological consequences of our aggression have compromised their will to live.'

Paccalet, who worked with French marine explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, added: 'To reproduce, whales need a large number of individuals to ensure that they meet, frolic and excite each other.

'Otherwise, the species may give in to a kind of sexual melancholy and simply stop breeding.'

Despite an international moratorium on whale hunting in 1986, Japan, Norway and Iceland continue to cull more than 2,000 a year for their meat and oil.

Some species like the North Pacific and North Atlantic whales have been reduced to just a few hundred survivors, and could be extinct within decades.

[Image: article-0-01B500C400000578-871_468x455.jpg]
A dead mother and baby whale are hoisted onto a whale hunting boat

Over hunting is causing social problems which mean whales could stop breeding

Even species counted in the thousands and expanding each year by up to ten per cent would need many years of uninterrupted breeding to regain their original numbers, scientists say.

Blue whales have recovered from a low of 400 in the 1970s to around 2,200 today, but that is believed to be only one per cent of their numbers 500 years ago.

A 2007 study by the Iceland Marine Research Institute revealed a 'significant decrease' in the population of minke whales since 2001. Japan and Norway killed more than 1,600 minke in 2007.

Regina Asmutis-Silvia, senior biologist at the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, said commercial hunting was not the only threat to their survival.

'It is a mistake to factor out the single issue of hunting. You need to look at the cumulative impact of vessel strikes, entanglements in fishing nets, pollution, destruction of habitat and acoustic disturbances.

'Climate change is also looming as a danger, and acidification of the oceans driven by global warming could also sharply reduce the number of krill, which are the mainstay of the whale diet.

'Their situation is very critical. It could go either way," she said.

Representatives from pro-whaling and pro-conservation groups will come face to face at the International Whaling Commission's annual meeting this week to discuss how to save the species from extinction.
Quote:wow wow wow excellent Reichian/Freud post. Reich was such an incredible integrator of huge amounts of realities-about the ENERGIES.

about time for a Reichian revisitation of his massive amounts of materials. So many if not most, need this type of loosening and healing therapies.

Body language is so revealing-it is so easy to see where we have our armor. This allopathic med system has got to be replaced asap by those working at the healings.

Of course in Reich's case, his works were all confiscated by the government and he ended up in prison-that's what happens to the wise ones in this society. Or rather, used to happen to them, the time for change is present again.


Thank you Gard...

I may be an architect now (I think?), and had a couple boat racing rock and roll decades
however I was trained first and foremost as a body worker away back when by some of the best..


Rofl







That last article on Grof is fabulous, gets into an entire holistic social view
It is true and that is why every single stinking man created religion puts a lot of its CONTROL on its members sexuality. And governments with their CONTROL of the sexuality.

But without consciousness and encouragement of developing the healthy use of our life force, our energies-it becomes one deviated perverted situation-like all of the AUTHORITY FIGURES RIGHT NOW MOLESTING, RAPING, MURDERING, STEALING, ABDUCTING, PORNOGRAPHING victims who have not given their consent or agreement in any way to their use and abuse by the low vibrating specimans CONTROLLING THEIR LIFE FORCE AND EVEN STEALING IT, TAKING IT, USING IT AND KILLING IT.

Yes! every true healer-wise man or woman who have come here to develop us to our true potentials, using our own vital forces including the sexual forces-human developers have been penalized in every way possible.

Everyone knows of Freud, many of Reich but that man was so incredibly multi tasking for integration of all the parts to the whole, he died a miserable ending to a brilliant genius.

BUT the ones of Reich's level are coming back now en masse and they will not be stopped this time. Their energies too rich-too strong.

And funny to notice too-the religions that restrict, restrain-use guilt and denial as weapons against the sexual energies are always the ones demanding mass procreation. Many rules, many laws, many lies, much guilt= grey and beige perverted people.
Poor Lance and approximately 30 other riders' had a bit of a mishap the 16th in California during AMG raceweek. Seems a motorcycle crashed in directly in front of the biking group <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/damned.gif" alt="Damned" title="damned" />