Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Ceres Dawn (rebuild)
#1
Not sure what just happened, but can't find the Ceres Dawn thread anywhere
so I'll rebuild it, the best is yet to come anyway

dammit.


Ceres' Dawn
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#1
02-06-2015, 03:08 AM (This post was last modified: 06-06-2015, 06:11 PM by agrorithms.)

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/-1QWMQTTKPE[/flash]

Nice Albedo Point...I wonder what latitude?

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/lBR0sRqy7wM[/flash]

[Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif]

This is gonna be exciting. [Image: reefer.gif]

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#2
02-06-2015, 03:18 AM

[Image: guitar.gif] [Image: guitar.gif] [Image: guitar.gif]

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/7Du9tuEG4M0[/flash]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#3
02-06-2015, 04:11 AM (This post was last modified: 02-06-2015, 04:12 AM by Vianova.)

This is a planetarium image from last year,
but I am unsure if they have enhanced the image
or if it is completely original.
Shows water vapor geysers.

https://penningtonplanetarium.files.word...in-014.jpg

[Image: asteroid-ceres-with-twin-014.jpg]




Quote: Wrote:Images of Ceres were released back in December, 
but those images were just for calibration.  
Dawn’s recently captured pictures are about 27 pixels across, 
about three times better than what it took last month.



Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#4
02-08-2015, 11:13 AM (This post was last modified: 02-08-2015, 03:02 PM by agrorithms.)

Closer view of Ceres shows multiple white spots

Feb 06, 2015 by Bob King, Universe Today 

[Image: 1-closerviewof.gif]
Animation of  photos of the asteroid Ceres taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft on Feb. 4, 2015 at a distance of about 90,000 miles (145,000 kilometers). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

Quote: Wrote:NASA's Dawn spacecraft has acquired its latest and closest-yet snapshot of the mysterious dwarf planet world Ceres. These latest images, taken on Feb. 4, from a distance of about 90,000 miles (145,000 km) clearly show craters – including a couple with central peaks –  and a clearer though still ambiguous view of that wild white spot that has so many of us scratching our heads as to its nature.

Get ready to scratch some more. The mystery spot has plenty of company.

Take a look at some still images I grabbed from the video which NASA made available today. In several of the photos, the white spot clearly looks like a depression, possibly an impact site. In others, it appears more like a rise or mountaintop. But perhaps the most amazing thing is that there appear to be not one but many white dabs and splashes on Ceres' 590-mile-wide globe.

[Image: closerviewof.jpg]
Here the spot appears more like a depression. Frost? Ice? Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

[Image: 1-closerviewof.jpg]
Here the white spot is at the asteroid’s left limb. You can also see lots of additional smaller spots that remind me of rayed lunar craters. Of course, they may be something else entirely.  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

[Image: 2-closerviewof.jpg]
Look down along the lower limb to spot a crater with a cool central peak. Note also how many white spots are now visible on Ceres. The mystery spot is a little right of center in this view. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

[Image: 3-closerviewof.jpg]
Our mystery white spot is further right of center. Is it a rise or a hole?Are the streaks rays for fresh material from an impact the way the lunar crater Tycho appears from Earth?  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

[Image: 4-closerviewof.jpg]
Yet another view of the mystery spot. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

Now let's take a look at an additional NASA animation of Ceres made using processed images. As the spot first rounds the limb it looks like a depression. But just before it disappears around the backside a pointed peak seems to appear. Intriguing, isn't it?

[Image: closerviewof.gif]
Animation made from images taken by Dawn on Feb. 4. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

http://phys.org/news/2015-02-closer-view...white.html


[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT-IW6iQyH7Xxo-ahb1WHs...jVGQ2a6bmW]
[Image: reefer.gif] [Image: reefer.gif] [Image: reefer.gif]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#5
02-23-2015, 03:41 AM

Dawn captures sharper images of Ceres

Feb 17, 2015 

[Image: dawncaptures.jpg]
These two views of Ceres were acquired by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on Feb. 12, 2015, from a distance of about 52,000 miles (83,000 kilometers) as the dwarf planet rotated. The images have been magnified from their original size. The Dawn spacecraft is due to arrive at Ceres on March 6, 2015. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

Quote: Wrote:Craters and mysterious bright spots are beginning to pop out in the latest images of Ceres from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. These images, taken Feb. 12 at a distance of 52,000 miles (83,000 kilometers) from the dwarf planet, pose intriguing questions for the science team to explore as the spacecraft nears its destination. 

"As we slowly approach the stage, our eyes transfixed on Ceres and her planetary dance, we find she has beguiled us but left us none the wiser,"
 said Chris Russell, principal investigator of the Dawn mission, based at UCLA. "We expected to be surprised; we did not expect to be this puzzled."

Dawn will be gently captured into orbit around Ceres on March 6. As the spacecraft delivers better images and other data, the science team will be investigating the nature and composition of the dwarf planet, including the nature of the craters and bright spots that are coming into focus. The latest images, which have a resolution of 4.9 miles (7.8 kilometers) per pixel, represent the sharpest views of Ceres to date.

The spacecraft explored the giant asteroid Vesta for 14 months during 2011 and 2012. Scientists gained numerous insights about the geological history of this body and saw its cratered surface in fine detail. By comparing Vesta and Ceres, they will develop a better understanding of the formation of the solar system.


Provided by  Jet Propulsion Laboratory
http://phys.org/news/2015-02-dawn-captur...s.html#jCp 

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#6
02-26-2015, 01:40 AM (This post was last modified: 02-26-2015, 01:47 AM by agrorithms.)

[Image: sw4script352.jpg] [Image: reefer.gif]

Mystery Spot on Dwarf Planet Ceres Has Mysterious Partner 

by Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer  |  February 25, 2015 05:40pm ET 

[Image: ceres-nasa-dawn-spacecraft.jpg?1424889916]

This image of Ceres, taken by NASA's Dawn probe on Feb. 19, 2015, from a distance of about 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers), shows two mysterious bright spots on the dwarf planet's surface.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA


Quote: Wrote:The intrigue surrounding Ceres continues to deepen as a NASA probe gets closer to the dwarf planet.

The new photos of Ceres from NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which is scheduled to arrive in orbit around Ceres on the night of March 5, reveal that a puzzling bright spot on the dwarf planet's surface has a buddy of sorts.

"Ceres' bright spot can now be seen to have a companion of lesser brightness, but apparently in the same basin," Dawn principal investigator Chris Russell, of UCLA, said in a statement. 

[Image: deathstar%20demotivational2.jpg]

"This may be pointing to a volcanolike origin of the spots, but we will have to wait for better resolution before we can make such geologic interpretations."

[How NASA's Dawn Mission Works (Infographic)
[Image: dawn-vesta-ceres-asteroids-infographic-1...1310648425]

http://www.space.com/28659-ceres-mysteri...hotos.html


Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: default_avatar.png]
goshawks [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 989
Threads: 19
Joined: Jan 2014 
Reputation: 0

#7
02-26-2015, 08:29 PM

Note the huge, partial 'crater wall' centered on that image. Proportionately, it is as big as those that produced the largest lunar mares. Since it has little 'depth' relative to its diameter, I wonder if the underlying crust (possibly ice) 'relaxed' to fill it in...

[Image: dawncaptures.jpg]

Hunter S. Thompson: "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#8
02-26-2015, 11:33 PM (This post was last modified: 02-26-2015, 11:36 PM by agrorithms.)

(02-26-2015, 08:29 PM)goshawks link Wrote: Wrote:Note the huge, partial 'crater wall' centered on that image. Proportionately, it is as big as those that produced the largest lunar mares. Since it has little 'depth' relative to its diameter, I wonder if the underlying crust (possibly ice) 'relaxed' to fill it in...

[Image: dawncaptures.jpg]


I dunno??? [Image: dunno.gif]
Goshawks, what EYE do KNOW is improv is as is was:

The efforts of a very small clique of Pluto-haters within the International Astronomical Union (IAU) plutoed Pluto in 2006.

look what the original poster has initiated.

NASA missions may re-elevate Pluto and Ceres from dwarf planets to full-on planet status

13 hours ago by David A Weintraub, The Conversation 

Quote: Wrote:Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt, and NASA's Dawn spacecraft will arrive at this dwarf planet on March 6, 2015.

Pluto is the largest object in the Kuiper belt, and NASA's New Horizons spacecraft will arrive at this dwarf planet on July 15, 2015.

These two events will make 2015 an exciting year for solar system exploration and discovery. But there is much more to this story than mere science. I expect 2015 will be the year when general consensus, built upon our new knowledge of these two objects, will return Pluto and add Ceres to our family of solar system planets.

The efforts of a very small clique of Pluto-haters within the International Astronomical Union (IAU) plutoed Pluto in 2006.
 Of the approximately 10,000 internationally registered members of the IAU in 2006, only 237 voted in favor of the resolution redefining Pluto as a "dwarf planet" while 157 voted against; the other 9,500 members were not present at the closing session of the IAU General Assembly in Prague at which the vote to demote Pluto was taken. Yet Pluto's official planetary status was snatched away.

Ceres and Pluto are both spheroidal objects, like Mercury, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. That's part of the agreed upon definition of a planet. They both orbit a star, the Sun, like Venus, Mars, Uranus and Neptune. That's also part of the widely accepted definition of a planet.

Unlike the larger planets, however, Ceres, like Pluto, according to the IAU definition, "has not cleared the neighborhood around its orbit." The asteroid belt is, apparently, Ceres' neighborhood while the Kuiper Belt is Pluto's neighborhood – though no definition of a planet's neighborhood exists, and no agreed upon understanding of what "clearing the neighborhood" yet exists. Furthermore, no broad-based agreement exists as to why "clearing the neighborhood" need be a requirement in order for an object to be considered a planet.


Some planetary astronomers would argue that were the Earth placed in the Kuiper Belt, it would not be able to clear its neighborhood and thus would not be considered, by the IAU definition, a planet; apparently location matters. Here a planet, there not a planet. I'd argue that location shouldn't matter; instead, the intrinsic properties of the objects themselves should matter more. And so we are led back to Ceres and Pluto.


[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT-IW6iQyH7Xxo-ahb1WHs...jVGQ2a6bmW]

Never before visited by human spacecraft, Ceres and Pluto, as we will soon bear witness, are both evolving, changing worlds. Yesterday, Ceres and Pluto were strangers, distant, barely known runt members of our solar system. By the end of this calendar year, however, we will have showered both objects with our passion and our attention, we will have welcomed them both into our embrace. And we almost certainly will once again call both of them planets.

Ceres, temporarily a planet

Ceres was discovered on New Year's Day in 1801, by Italian astronomer Giuseppe Piazzi, a member of an international team of astronomers dubbed the Celestial Police, who were searching for a supposedly missing planet in between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. When discovered, Ceres was immediately recognized as a planet, the eighth one known at the time (neither Neptune nor Pluto had been discovered yet).

[Image: 1-nasamissions.jpg]
Launch of NASA’s Dawn spacecraft from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, September 27, 2007. Get ready, Ceres! Credit: NASA 

[Image: rooster-crowing-2.jpg]

But within a few years, other objects in the asteroid belt were discovered and Ceres no longer seemed to stand out as far from the crowd. In 1802, the great astronomer William Herschel suggested that Ceres and Pallas and any other smaller solar system objects should be called asteroids – meaning star-like. In telescope images, they were so tiny that they looked point-like, like stars, rather than disk-like, like planets. And so, more than a century before Pluto was discovered, Ceres was plutoed.

But Ceres does still stand out. It's the largest asteroid, by far, nearly 1,000 kilometers across (twice as large in diameter as Vesta, the second largest asteroid), though not perfectly spherical in shape.

As happened inside Earth and other planets, planetary scientists think that long ago, the denser material in Ceres separated from the lighter material and sank to form a core.

Astronomers think Ceres is rich in water – as much as one-third of Ceres might be water – and may have a thin atmosphere. Bright, white spots on its surface might even be large frozen lakes. Ceres may, in fact, have as much fresh water as Earth, have Earth-like polar caps, and might even have a sub-surface liquid ocean layer, like Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus.

Beginning this month, we'll start to learn more about these tantalizing possibilities. With our increasing knowledge of and familiarity with Ceres, we will no longer be able to identify meaningful criteria that will allow us to continue to classify Ceres as not-a-planet. Ceres will continue to be a small planet, but in 2015 we will come to understand that dwarf planets are planets, too.

Pluto's short planetary reign

When Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, many astronomers were certain that a large planet orbited the Sun beyond Neptune. Instead they found Pluto, which turned out to be small compared to Earth and Neptune, though more than double the size of Ceres, with a diameter of 2,300 kilometers.

Pluto also has an unusual orbit, as it crosses Neptune's orbit, though it does so in such a way that it can never collide with Neptune.

[Image: 2-nasamissions.jpg]
An artist’s impression of the Dawn spacecraft traveling in the asteroid belt with its target Ceres on the right. Credit: JPL 

Pluto's modern-day troubles began in 1992, when astronomers David Jewitt and Jane Luu discovered the first objects in the region of the solar system now known as the Kuiper Belt. Whereas the asteroid belt where Ceres resides is made mostly of house- and mountain-sized rocks that orbit the Sun in between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, the Kuiper Belt is made mostly of house- and mountain-sized chunks of ice that orbit the Sun beyond the orbit of Neptune. Pluto, as it turns out, is one of the biggest objects in the Kuiper Belt.

So what is Pluto?

Pluto is the last unexplored planet in our solar system. And the Kuiper Belt may contain hundreds of other planetary worlds like Pluto. These may be the most numerous worlds in the solar system; they may contain, together, the most total surface area of all the solid-surfaced planets.

Pluto has one large moon, Charon, and at least four small moons: Nix, Hydra, Kerberos and Styx. It has an atmosphere that expands and contracts as Pluto warms and cools during its 248 year orbit around the Sun. The surface is likely rich in water ice, enriched with methane and nitrogen and carbon monoxide frosts; these ices might contain complex organic molecules.

[Image: 3-nasamissions.jpg]
Water geysers erupting from south polar region of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute 

The New Horizons mission is poised to answer some of our myriad questions about Pluto. How did it form? What is the atmosphere made of? What is the surface like? Does Pluto have a magnetic field? What are the moons like? Does Pluto have a subsurface ocean? Is the surface of Pluto's moon Charon pure water ice?

Pluto has guarded its secrets for four and half billion years. But in a few months, a few intrepid humans will pull back the curtain on Pluto and say "Hello, Pluto, we're here." And Pluto will begin to share her secrets with us. When she does, as with Ceres, our familiarity with Pluto will help us recognize that Pluto is, was, and has always been a planet, albeit a small one.

We only get to visit Ceres and Pluto for the very first time, once. This year. March 6 and July 15. In your lifetime. In this incredible year of the dwarf planet. Get ready to party. Ceres and Pluto are coming home.

[Image: 54eef1accfcec.gif]
Animation of rotating Ceres, made from a series of images taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft on February 4, 2015, at a distance of about 90,000 miles from the planet. Credit: NASA 

[Image: 4-nasamissions.jpg]
Pluto and its five moons – as seen from the Hubble Space Telescope in July, 2012. Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Showalter (SETI Institute)  
Source:  The Conversation
http://phys.org/news/2015-02-nasa-missio...s.html#jCp 



Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#2
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#9
02-26-2015, 11:44 PM

Hoagland is betting  please,please,please be @19.5  [Image: drool.gif]

Lincoln is betting please oh please don't be 19.5 so the guy can't write anymore books he must review.  [Image: bricks.gif]

Now wouldn't that be sum thing.

The restoration of proper status.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#10
03-06-2015, 07:25 PM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2015, 07:40 PM by agrorithms.)

Hello Ceres! NASA spacecraft on first visit to dwarf planet

7 hours ago by By Alicia Chang

[Image: 9-nasaspacecra.jpg]
Factfile on the US spacecraft Dawn and the latest stage of its mission to explore the origins of the solar system 

After a nearly eight-year journey, a NASA spacecraft on Friday flawlessly slipped into orbit around Ceres in the first visit to a dwarf planet. 

Quote: Wrote:The robotic Dawn craft will circle the dwarf planet for more than a year, exploring its surface and unraveling its mysteries.

"It went exactly the way we expected. Dawn gently, elegantly slid into Ceres' gravitational embrace," said Marc Rayman, chief engineer for the $473 million mission managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.

Ceres is the second and final stop for Dawn, which launched in 2007 on a voyage to the main asteroid belt, a zone between Mars and Jupiter that's littered with rocky leftovers from the formation of the sun and planets some 4½ billion years ago.

Dawn will spend 16 months photographing the icy surface. It previously spent a year at Vesta exploring the asteroid and sending back stunning close-ups of its lumpy surface before cruising onto Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt.

The 3-billion mile trip was made possible by Dawn's ion propulsion engines, which provide gentle yet constant acceleration and are more efficient than conventional thrusters.

As Dawn approached Ceres, it beamed back the best pictures ever taken of the dwarf planet. Some puzzling images revealed a pair of shiny patches inside a crater—signs of possible ice or salt.

Scientists hope to get a better glimpse of the spots when the spacecraft spirals closer to the surface. It'll also study whether previously spotted plumes of water vapor continue to vent.

"There are a lot of secrets that will be revealed," said mission scientist Lucy McFadden at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland.

The spacecraft glided into place at 4:39 a.m. Friday and flight controllers received confirmation about an hour later. The maneuver occurred without a tense moment, unlike other captures that require braking to slow down.

"The real drama is exploring this alien, exotic world," Rayman said.

Dawn is currently in Ceres' shadows and won't take new pictures until it emerges in April, he said.

Discovered in 1801, Ceres measures 600 miles across—as wide as Texas—and has a rocky core. It's named after the Roman goddess of agriculture and harvest. It was initially called a planet before it was demoted to an asteroid and later classified as a dwarf planet. Like planets, dwarf planets are spherical in shape, but they share the same celestial neighborhood with other similar-sized bodies. 

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/sJr-pctUYdw[/flash]

With its massive solar wings spread out, Dawn is about the size of a tractor-trailer, measuring 65 feet from tip to tip. It carries an infrared spectrometer and a gamma ray and neutron detector to study the surface of Ceres from orbit.

The spacecraft was about 38,000 miles from Ceres when it began orbiting. In the coming months, it will spiral down to within 235 miles of Ceres' surface where it will remain long after the mission is over.

"Every time we get closer, we see more things that make us scratch our heads," said mission scientist Mark Sykes, who heads the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona.

Dawn almost never made it out to the inner solar system. The mission endured funding-related project cancellations and launch delays before it received the green light to fly.

Dwarf planets lately have become the focus of exploration.

This summer, another NASA spacecraft—New Horizons—is set to make the first visit to Pluto, which was downgraded to dwarf planet.

Explore further: NASA's Dawn spacecraft moves in on dwarf planet Ceres 
More information: Dawn mission: dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/

http://phys.org/news/2015-03-nasa-craft-...f.html#jCp



Since It is my Daughter's 19th birthday today...
From now on I will refer to Bright-SpotA as 'hanna' 
I will refer to the smaller Bright SpotB as 'logan' after my grandson.

After all...they are the bright-spots in the twinkle of my eye.
Before Nasa Names them. [Image: guitar.gif]

Bright-SpotA'hanna' 
[Image: 1-nasacraftcir.jpg]
Bright SpotB'logan' 
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: default_avatar.png]
goshawks [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 989
Threads: 19
Joined: Jan 2014 
Reputation: 0

#11
03-06-2015, 07:45 PM

EA, excellent news! Thanks.

Quote: Wrote:Dawn is currently in Ceres' shadows and won't take new pictures until it emerges in April, he said.

Aarrggh! [Image: cry.png]

Let's hope that mission scientists can do a gravity-derivation of what's inside Ceres in the meantime... [Image: drool.gif]
Hunter S. Thompson: "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#12
03-06-2015, 08:09 PM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2015, 08:15 PM by agrorithms.)

While it is occulted I will compose an e-card for her(Bright-SpotA) because she got her $200 birthday present yesterday and got a tattoo with sum of the gi$t[Image: reefer.gif]


The wait for "First-Light" is not so long off after 8 years and vesta... [Image: dance2.gif]

The moments that the craft is in darkness will make a sweeter science mission phase @dawn.

And while in shadow...so much more an homage my Bright Spots will be when my Girl gets the inbox birthday message. [Image: dance2.gif]

Who the hell kinda crazy person doesn't like presents.
Mystery Spot on Dwarf Planet Ceres Has Mysterious Partner(Bright-SpotB) 
Thanx NASA you make hallmark moments Easy for Ea see? :happybday:
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_47.png?dateline=1429825868]
Fsbirdhouse [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 4,401
Threads: 425
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#13
03-07-2015, 02:00 AM (This post was last modified: 03-07-2015, 02:05 AM by Fsbirdhouse.)

lotta chatter about those two extremely bright spots on Ceres on the news and all over.
They are particularly bright aren't they?

As I sit here contemplating the mysteries of the Solar System, strains of theme music from the 'Golden Girls' is wafting down the hall to my computer room.
Almost enough to move me to tears.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_188.jpg?dateline=1429989813]
almon [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 946
Threads: 72
Joined: May 2007 
Reputation: 0

#14
03-07-2015, 05:36 AM

its amazing! as soon as dawn enters orbit the controllers  shut it off until sometime in april. how convenient ! gives the liars plenty of time to fake it again. [Image: bricks.gif]
more or less hudsons bay again

Find
Reply

[Image: default_avatar.png]
lincoln [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Senior Member
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 592
Threads: 42
Joined: Sep 2008 
Reputation: 0

#15
03-07-2015, 12:01 PM

(03-07-2015, 05:36 AM)almon link Wrote: Wrote:its amazing! as soon as dawn enters orbit the controllers  shut it off until sometime in april. how convenient ! gives the liars plenty of time to fake it again.


Almon, dear... they've had 9 years to make up whatever lies they want. Why wait until a month from best pictures?

Or, better yet, why speculate about liars in the science team when you haven't a shred of evidence?


Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#16
03-07-2015, 08:43 PM (This post was last modified: 03-07-2015, 08:44 PM by agrorithms.)

(02-06-2015, 03:08 AM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/-1QWMQTTKPE[/flash]

Nice Albedo Point...I wonder what latitude?

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/lBR0sRqy7wM[/flash]

[Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif]

This is gonna be exciting. [Image: reefer.gif]


cliff-hanging!!! [Image: uhoh.gif] - no wait. [Image: hmm2.gif]

[Image: dance2.gif] That was Philae in my live Classic Quantum Cat thread where improv was proved prescient.
I'm still waiting for Philae to Jump up. [Image: mellow.gif]

I am sure when the Science Mission begins itz phase we will be presciently surprised.

Patience.

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#17
03-08-2015, 04:48 AM



The spacecraft has clearly been taking pictures on the approach, 
so what reason is there to not take pictures,
on the closing in approach phase now? 

The bright spots may be very recent impacts of small objects.
Ceres has a dust covered surface.
... a quick impact and perhaps liquid water swells up and solidifies,
with no dust on the surface of the up swell.

If so, imagine a group of small meteors peppering the overall surface.
It might look like a disco ball as it rotates. 



Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_420.jpg?dateline=1430129841]
watcher [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Member
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 230
Threads: 1
Joined: May 2010 
Reputation: 0

#18
03-08-2015, 07:12 AM (This post was last modified: 03-08-2015, 03:19 PM by watcher.)

Maybe find out a little more about spacecrafts status before becoming impatient. All ways a nest bed for confusion and the occasional conspiracy!

Quote: Wrote:Because of the failure of two reaction wheels, Dawn will make fewer camera observations of Ceres during its approach phase than it did during its Vesta approach. Camera observations require turning the spacecraft, which consumes precious hydrazine fuel. Seven optical navigation photo sessions (OpNav 1–7, on January 13 and 25, February 3 and 25, March 1, and April 10 and 15) and two full rotation observation sessions (RC1–2, on February 12 and 19) are planned before full observation begins with orbital capture. The gap in March and early April is when Ceres appears too close to the sun from Dawn?'?s vantage point to take pictures safely.


So......
Tech issues for number of approach images!
And protoplanet is not in ideal position (now) for optimal surface imaging! 

No lies. Just asking the right questions. 
TW

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#19
03-08-2015, 06:45 PM

[Image: dn27099-2_1200.gif]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: default_avatar.png]
goshawks [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 989
Threads: 19
Joined: Jan 2014 
Reputation: 0

#20
03-08-2015, 10:29 PM (This post was last modified: 03-08-2015, 10:31 PM by goshawks.)

Thanks, Watcher. Good to have 'data'.

Quote: Wrote:...the failure of two reaction wheels...


Begin rant:
I have always been puzzled by the refusal of planners/bean counters/project managers to double or triple up on reaction wheels and gyroscopes. They do add a minor amount of expense and weight, but numerous missions have been 'offed' just due to these components failing. (Spacecraft otherwise in fine to fair condition.) These are on the 'critical path' to mission success.

We almost lost Hubble once due to that. We did lose the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, a Hubble-class mission, to that - with the spacecraft otherwise fine. Kepler was knocked out of its primary mission due to that - with the spacecraft otherwise fine. Others that I cannot remember just now.

I would think that planners/bean counters/project managers would have noted that these are notorious 'vulnerable points' in mission longevity, and thrown in multiple 'spares'. What a waste, both of science and taxpayers' money. Grrr.
End rant.
Hunter S. Thompson: "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#21
03-09-2015, 02:29 AM




Looking at the rotating Ceres image that EA just posted,
it looked like there were more of those white spots present in several places.
They did however look more faded,
or perhaps covering up slowly in dust.
For instance look in the upper left of Ceres,
for the crater with a fading white spot as it to comes around, 
then shortly after the larger brighter pair of spots appears below that.

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#22
03-09-2015, 02:00 PM (This post was last modified: 03-09-2015, 03:40 PM by agrorithms.)

The only mechanism I can think of: [glow=red,2,300]plasmonics.
[/glow]
If this is not a mere "Reflection" of the sun off of ice or salt at an angle to the spacecraft is just a guess while we wait for more data.

Consider transient lunar phenomena.

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/ByC6SUf6WHQ[/flash]

Quote: Wrote:
Quote: Wrote:The Lunar Plasma Environment: Observations
from Apollo show that the surface of the Moon is electrically
charged [6]. The lunar dayside charges to ~
+10 V due to the photoemission of electrons by incident
solar UV/X-rays (i.e., loss of negative charge),
while the near-terminator region charges to ~ ?100 V
due to the higher fluxes of fast moving plasma electrons
compared with the slower moving plasma ions
(i.e., accumulation of negative charge) [1, 2, 6]. More
recently, observations from the Lunar Prospector Electron
Reflectometer (LP/ER) reveal that the Moon can
charge up to ~ ?4 kV during SEP events [7].
The near-surface plasma environment is further
complicated by the lunar wake and magnetic anomalies.
The lunar wake is a “void” that forms downstream
of the Moon in the solar wind and is filled with
tenuous hot electrons and ion beams [8]. The fundamental
plasma processes that form and re-fill the wake
are still not well understood [5]. Exactly how solar
wind plasma interacts with magnetic anomalies on the
lunar surface is very much an open question
 [5]. It is
possible that some anomalies can “stand-off” the solar
wind plasma and limit the space weathering of the underlying
regolith [9].
Impact on Exploration: Under certain conditions,
the resulting lunar surface electric fields could pose
electrostatic discharge (ESD) hazards to robotic and
human explorers [5]. 

[Image: equatorial-ionization-anomaly-plasma-fountain.jpg]

The greatest ESD risk is anticipated
to occur near the terminator and on the nightside,
since this is where the extreme lunar charging has been
observed, and it is likely much more difficult for objects
to reach a common electrical “ground” at these
locations.

It almost seems as if Bright-Spots A,B. flick on like a flourescent neon sign.
At the Day / Night Terminator. [Image: damned.gif]
[Image: dn27099-2_1200.gif]
The greatest ESD risk is anticipated to occur near the terminator and on the nightside,
since this is where the extreme lunar charging has been observed


Could heavy deuterium ice and normal ice clathrates as well as sodium ions and outgassing,
cause the charge dynamo of rotation to  make aural clouds and [glow=red,2,300]electric ice[/glow]?  [Image: hmm2.gif]

Does the Dwarf Planet Ceres have a magnetic solid core?

Does the impact crater itself have a Mascon? [Image: dunno.gif]

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/g9Lw2oV7nSc[/flash]

Skip to 5:50 minute mark on video below.

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/oZdQJi-UwYs[/flash]

A flash- precipitated salt crystal??? [Image: bricks.gif]



Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_4.jpg?dateline=1433683445]
[b]Keith[/b] [Image: buddy_online.png] 
Hidden Mission Control
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 6,855
Threads: 298
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 3

#23
03-09-2015, 06:25 PM (This post was last modified: 03-09-2015, 06:27 PM by Anonymous.)

swamp gas

We'd prove it with pictures, but the whatchamafuckit on the doomaflaunchy isn't working

Science embodies statements in degrees of certainty Some unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely sure.
Beliefs spawned from ignorance are equal to unintelligent skepticism.
Despite disputation- The truth shall set us all free, whether or not it's the truth you want to believe

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_19.jpg?dateline=1430024178]
rhw007 [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 2,855
Threads: 141
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 0

#24
03-10-2015, 12:27 AM

As long as NASA/JPL are NEVER really really confronted by CMMM(Criminal Meanstream Media Mafia) they will continue to LIE and HIDE, Distort Data or just Never Anytime Say Anything / Jism Penile Laughing  [Image: yak.gif]

Bob... [Image: ninja.gif] [Image: reefer.gif]
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album 
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.    
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_420.jpg?dateline=1430129841]
watcher [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Member
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 230
Threads: 1
Joined: May 2010 
Reputation: 0

#25
03-10-2015, 07:31 AM

I'm hedging on fresh impact crater. Shes located within the Kepler belt. Shes big, dense and has considerable gravitaional pull (Shape points to large enough mass to form spherical shape)..  Shes made of a lot of ice.

Heres an example of Lunar impact by us ;)
[Image: 141028214139-large.jpg]

Quote: Wrote:LRO has imaged the LADEE impact site on the eastern rim of Sundman V crater. The image was created by ratioing two images, one taken before the impact and another afterwards. The bright area highlights what has changed between the time of the two images, specifically the impact point and the ejecta.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University


Website Find
Reply
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#3
[Image: default_avatar.png]
goshawks [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 989
Threads: 19
Joined: Jan 2014 
Reputation: 0

#26
03-10-2015, 04:38 PM

I am curious about post-impact 'leveling' of crater floors on Ceres. On the bottom third of EA's rotating image, there is a huge (old) crater. It is filled-in almost to the brim. The crater-floor color is about the same as the 'highlands', so I would bet on it being ice. What I am curious about is whether it was just some form of 'ice creep' over long periods to achieve gravitational equilibrium, or whether the impact 'punctured' into deep water/ice 'slush' (a form of ocean) which then filled-in the crater over a short period. In the latter case, it would be kind of like those tires which are self-sealing...
Hunter S. Thompson: "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#27
03-10-2015, 05:04 PM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2015, 06:38 PM by agrorithms.)

[Image: damned.gif] I missed this on my Daughter's B-day... [Image: bricks.gif]

I'll have to let her in on that l'il factoid.


[move]Dawn entered Orbit at  [Image: worship.gif] [glow=red,2,300]~3.33 AU[/glow] from Earth.  [Image: dance2.gif]  March 6, 2015[/move]

Now Thatza Present! 

(03-06-2015, 08:09 PM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:While it is occulted I will compose an e-card for her(Bright-SpotA) because she got her $200 birthday present yesterday and got a tattoo with sum of the gi$t[Image: reefer.gif]


The wait for "First-Light" is not so long off after 8 years and vesta... [Image: dance2.gif]

The moments that the craft is in darkness will make a sweeter science mission phase @dawn.

And while in shadow...so much more an homage my Bright Spots will be when my Girl gets the inbox birthday message. [Image: dance2.gif]

Who the hell kinda crazy person doesn't like presents.
Mystery Spot on Dwarf Planet Ceres Has Mysterious Partner(Bright-SpotB) 
Thanx NASA you make hallmark moments Easy for Ea see? :happybday: 3.33

Quote: Wrote:Dawn is 37,800 miles (60,800 kilometers) from Ceres, or 16 percent of the average distance between Earth and the moon. It is also 3.33 AU (310 million miles, or 498 million kilometers) from Earth, or 1,230 times as far as the moon and 3.36 times as far as the sun today. Radio signals, traveling at the universal limit of the speed of light, take 55 minutes to make the round trip.


Dr. Marc D. Rayman
6:00 a.m. PST March 6, 2015
- See more at: http://dawnblog.jpl.nasa.gov/#sthash.ynMXNPlg.dpuf
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#28
03-10-2015, 06:46 PM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2015, 06:47 PM by agrorithms.)

I Am sorry. [Image: reefer.gif]

I have to Reboot. [Image: mellow.gif]

(02-06-2015, 03:08 AM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/-1QWMQTTKPE[/flash]

Nice Albedo Point...I wonder what latitude?

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/lBR0sRqy7wM[/flash]


[Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif]

This is gonna be exciting. [Image: reefer.gif]

WTF [Image: dunno.gif] Wayyyyyyy too perfect like itza write itself again. [Image: dance2.gif]

Improv is as is was.

[move] [glow=red,2,300]~3.33 AU[/glow] [/move]

Now back to your regularly scheduled reality...  [Image: rover.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#29
03-10-2015, 07:00 PM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2015, 07:47 PM by agrorithms.)

Studying Dwarf Planet Ceres: Q&A with Dawn Scientist Chris Russell

by Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer  |  March 10, 2015 08:25am ET 

[Image: dawn-spacecraft-artist-concept.jpg?1425990755]
Artist's concept of NASA's Dawn probe at the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn arrived in Ceres orbit on March 6, 2015.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Quote: Wrote:NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres last Friday (March 6), becoming the first probe ever to visit a dwarf planet.

Dawn is currently spiraling down to its first science orbit, which it's scheduled to reach on April 23. The spacecraft will then commence a 15-month investigation of Ceres, which at 590 miles (950 kilometers) wide is the largest object in the main asteroid belt beyond Mars and Jupiter.

This is not Dawn's first rodeo. The probe, which launched in September 2007, orbited the asteroid belt's second-biggest body, the protoplanet Vesta, from July 2011 through September 2012. [Read more coverage of Dawn's Ceres arrival]

Space.com recently caught up with Dawn principal investigator Chris Russell, a professor of geophysics and space physics at UCLA, to discuss Vesta, Ceres and what Dawn's legacy will be.

[Image: chris-russell-dawn-pi.jpg?1426004770]
Chris Russell of UCLA, principal investigator of NASA's Dawn mission.
Credit: Reed Hutchinson/UCLA


Space.com: So Dawn already studied Vesta up close, and now it's at Ceres. What are you most excited about?

Chris Russell: Let's just look at it from the building block theory. We think of these protoplanets as being the fundamental building blocks of the solar system, or at least the terrestrial planets.

You can think of the Earth as mainly being built out of Vestas. Vesta is a rocky exterior and an iron core; that's what we found when we got there, and that's what we expected. And the Earth is mainly an iron core with rock around it. However, we have water [on Earth]. Where did the water come from?

The Rosetta mission didn't find the right water out there on Comet 67 C-G [67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko]; they found the wrong isotopic ratios. So the water isn't coming from a large distance. It's probably coming from the inner solar system, and Ceres is a body with a lot of water on it. One quarter of the mass of Ceres is water, and three quarters is rock. If we had just a few Ceres-type bodies colliding with the Earth, we can explain where the water came from.

Space.com: What do you hope to learn at Ceres?

Russell: We live on a very complex planet, and we have thousands of geophysicists and geochemists and geologists prowling around trying to understand the various things that are going on. These smaller bodies are much simpler, but they have planetary processes that took place — and, in the case of Ceres, we believe, are taking place at the present time. So we're learning more about planetary physics by having a situation in which we can look at simpler objects and seeing how they behave. 

That's sort of at the top level. The other things, the measurement objectives, are to weigh Ceres very carefully, measure its size very carefully and take a look at its gravitational field and infer what the inhomogeneities in it mean — how big the core might be, what are the various regions of high density and low density on the body. And we'll study the surface very carefully and look at the craters.

We're going to be looking a the morphology of the craters — not just looking at the size of them or the number of them, but looking at what size craters display this sort of behavior, what size display that sort. Also, are there landslides, are there filling events, are there things that look like rivers? That would be interesting. So we'll be looking at features that you associate with water or flows of one sort of another on the surface.

We'll do typical planetary geology, more similar to what we do on Mars than what we did with Vesta.

Space.com: Could Dawn's measurements reveal whether Ceres has a subsurface ocean, as some researchers suspect?

Russell: That might be difficult for us. But we have instruments to measure the temperature of the surface. So what we can do is take the body's temperature and then compare it against models and say, if we had a model that was dry rock inside, it would have this sort of temperature on the surface, but if we had a planet that had wet rock inside, then it might have this temperature. And if it had a liquid ocean, that would transport heat even faster, and we might have this particular temperature on the surface. [6 Most Likely Places for Alien Life in the Solar System]

So we may be able to make some measurements that give us an indication indirectly of the various possible solutions. We will be making as many geophysical, geochemical and geological measurements as we can and then infer what structure might have led to that sort of behavior.

Space.com: You also hope to figure out just what causes those mysterious bright spots inside that Ceres crater, correct?

Russell: When you go to an asteroid or to the moon, you see a lot of cratering on the surface. It's sort of like a fractal pattern — you look at it on the large scale and the small scale, and it all looks about the same.

But at Ceres, we see something that is totally on a different scale. These bright spots don't fit into the cratering pattern. And we have not even been able to probe with our camera yet because it's much smaller. So there is some process on Ceres that is making a very, very small feature. [Ceres' Puzzling Bright Spots (Video)]

In this case, the feature is very reflective. There isn't something there signaling us actively. It's signaling us passively; it's reflecting the sunlight. It's consistent with reflecting all of the light if the spot is small enough. Now, we don't know what size it is, so we can't tell if the albedo is 40 percent, 60 percent, 80 percent or 100 percent, but it's probably in that range someplace. One thing that's very good in the solar system at reflecting sunlight is ice. For example, [Saturn's moon] Enceladus has an albedo of about 100 percent.

But there are people who are holding out for salt — not necessarily table salt, but salts of various minerals that may be white in appearance. So we have sort of a dichotomy of opinion in the team as to whether this has a dry or wet explanation. But we'll get to the bottom of this when we can resolve the bottom of the feature.


Quote:The only mechanism I can think of: [glow=red,2,300]plasmonics.
[/glow]
If this is not a mere "Reflection" of the sun off of ice or salt at an angle to the spacecraft is just a guess while we wait for more data.

Consider transient lunar phenomena.
[Image: bricks.gif] [Image: bricks.gif] [Image: bricks.gif]

Space.com: You'll be studying Ceres from orbit through June 2016, if all goes according to plan. What do you think Dawn's legacy be when it's all said and done?

Russell: Our first legacy was going to Vesta. Vesta had explained itself to us quite well by sending us all those meteorites, which we call the HED meteorites — howardites, eucrites, and diogenites — and those meteorites were taken apart by the geochemists and analyzed very carefully. They came up with both a model for Vesta and a model for solar system evolution. 

So we went to Vesta, and the first thing we did was show that the body the geochemists had predicted from the meteoritic evidence was the body that we found. That in turn validated the solar system model. It wasn't really in doubt in most quarters, but we were able to go out into space and give credence to that particular model. I consider that an important legacy.

At Ceres, we're basically finding the water. There's certainly a lot of water at Ceres; that suggests there were other bodies similar to Ceres that are not with us anymore but delivered their water to other places in the solar system. So we're learning more about the delivery of water, how water was gathered and maintained for 4.6 billion years out in the middle of the asteroid belt. That will probably give us a little courage to go out and explore some of the smaller bodies in the solar system that people have been calling main belt comets. In Ceres, we have a huge main belt comet with a very large supply of water inside it.

And ion propulsion is very, very important to this particular mission. By using ion propulsion, we were able to do things that larger missions could not have done. [Dawn is the only mission ever to orbit two objects beyond the Earth-moon system.] It kept our costs down but enabled us to behave in a particular way.

Although our legacy to science is with Vesta and Ceres, the legacy to space exploration, I think, is really high in that when other people appreciate what Dawn did, we will doing a lot more of this. It takes a little bit of extra time, but it's safer and cheaper, and that's important.

Watch Videos:

http://www.space.com/28776-nasa-dawn-cer...rview.html 
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#30
03-11-2015, 03:21 AM


from EA's last post

Quote: Wrote:One thing that's very good in the solar system at reflecting sunlight is ice [Image: whip.gif] 
For example, Enceladus has an albedo of about 100 percent.

Quote: Wrote:But there are people who are holding out for salt —  [Image: naughty.gif]
not necessarily table salt, 
but salts of various minerals that may be white in appearance. 
So we have sort of a dichotomy of opinion  [Image: whistle.gif]
in the team 
as to whether this has a dry or wet explanation.


How about .... high saline ice,
exposed from a recent small impact?
Here is an interesting image of ice stalactites,
mostly as a reference to the possibilities of life under the ice on Ceres

http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2013/10/through-the-ice/
Quote: Wrote:Ice stalactites, also known as “brinicles,” 
form under the sea ice when super cold saline water [Image: guitar.gif]
interacts with the ocean.

[Image: Jetty_20.jpg]


[Image: dance2.gif]






Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#31
03-18-2015, 12:05 PM (This post was last modified: 03-18-2015, 12:10 PM by agrorithms.)

Dawn breaks over distant Ceres ... and perhaps signs of habitability

20 minutes ago by Monica Grady, The Conversation   

[Image: dawnbreaksov.jpg] 
What is the Bright-SpotA: 'hanna' Bright SpotB: 'logan'  of Ceres? Not long till we find out. Credit: NASA   

Quote: Wrote:NASA's Dawn spacecraft is about to start its investigation of the largest member of the asteroid belt, 1 Ceres. It will take detailed images of the dwarf planet, and produce a geological map of its entire surface. But even before the spacecraft has reached its optimum orbit, the preliminary results just released are already surprising and delighting planetary scientists. 

Up until February 2015, the best images taken of Ceres were from the Hubble space telescope, showing a near-spherical body with one area that was much brighter than the rest of the surface. 

As Dawn approached Ceres, its camera acquired some remarkable images, at about three times the resolution of those from Hubble. The pictures verified that there was indeed a brighter region.

Bright-SpotA: 'hanna' Bright SpotB: 'logan'

Even better, close examination of the images showed that the area varied in brightness over the course of Ceres' day (which is only about nine hours long), growing dimmer as the dwarf planet moved into darkness. It is interpretation of this variability that has planetary scientists buzzing.

As if that were not enough, a further series of pictures appear to show a plume emanating from the surface. Is Ceres active? Does it have a layer of water or ice below a thin crust of rock? Could it be a ball of mud, overlain by a muddy ocean, on top of which is another thin muddy crust? The exact structure of Ceres is not yet known, although it is clear that it's not rocky all the way through – its density is too low, so there must be at least some water or ice present.Suggestions at the 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston, Texas, of icy volcanism on Ceres have led to speculation that the dwarf planet could potentially be habitable. Although Ceres does not have an atmosphere, life might exist in a subsurface ocean, as has been suggested for Europa or Enceladus, moons orbiting Jupiter and Saturn respectively.

[Image: dawnbreaksov.png]
Exploded map of Ceres showing ‘bright spot’. NASA 

Cryovolcanism – the presence of ice volcanoes – is not the only mechanism that can produce a plume of dust and ice from a planetary surface. The Rosetta mission has delivered amazing images of plumes coming from comet P/67 Churyumov-Gerasimenko, caused by sublimation of ice that releases dust and gas trapped inside the ice. Could the bright spot be an icy plume caused by the vaporisation of Ceres' surface as it turns towards the sun's heat, and then dropping away as night falls? Corridor talk at the conference speculates that Ceres might be closer to a comet than the asteroid it is usually regarded as. 

Fortunately, we won't have to wait much longer before we get some more definitive answers to questions of Ceres' physical structure and heritage. By the beginning of April, the Dawn spacecraft will be much closer and will start its imaging campaign in earnest, at which point we will start seeing craters and other surface features at better resolution.

[Image: 1-dawnbreaksov.jpg]
Is Ceres more slush than solid inside? Credit: NASA 

In preparation for descriptions of such features, and bearing in mind that Ceres was the Roman goddess of the harvest, the International Astronomical Union has ruled that craters on Ceres should be named after international deities of agriculture and vegetation, while other features will be named after agricultural festivals of the world.

I'm not sure just how many of these there are, or how memorable their names will turn out to be. But as the Dawn mission's principal investigator Chris Russell pointed out, there is one Mayan deity named Yum (Yum Kaax, god of agriculture and the jungle), who should readily be remembered. One can only hope the mission scientists find a suitably delicious feature on Ceres to give that name.

Explore further: Mysterious dwarf planet Ceres gets ready for the spotlight 
Source:  The Conversation 
http://phys.org/news/2015-03-dawn-distan...y.html#jCp 




Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#4
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#32
03-19-2015, 09:26 PM (This post was last modified: 03-19-2015, 09:36 PM by agrorithms.)

Bright-Spots A / B on Ceres could be water volcanoes

19:51 18 March 2015 by Jacob Aron

[Image: dn27193-1_300.jpg]
Perhaps a watery volcano(es) (Image:NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

Quote: Wrote:As NASA's Dawn spacecraft pulled into orbit earlier this month around the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt, it spotted a mysterious bright spot inside a crater. There were suspicions that the spot could be caused by water spewing into space, now fresh views, presented for the first time yesterday, lend weight to the idea.

The pictures show the bright spot is visible even from the side, meaning it probably protrudes above the crater. "What is amazing is you can see this feature while the rim is very likely in front of the line of sight," said Andreas Nathues, who is in charge of the mission's camera, and presented the images yesterday at the Lunar and Planetary Science conference (LPSC) in The Woodlands, Texas. "We believe this could be some kind of outgassing."

Images taken from dusk to dawn on Ceres show that the spot brightens throughout the day and completely disappears at night. This suggests it could be a pocket of ice on the surface that is being heated by the sun andreleasing gas, similarly to how a comet behaves. However, Natheus said the team needed higher resolution data to confirm its true nature. This won't come for a while, as Dawn is currently on the dark side of Ceres and won't emerge until mid-April.

Distant observations using the Herschel telescope show Ceres is spitting water from somewhere on its surface, but only Dawn will be able to pinpoint the location. Revealing the origin of Ceres's water could determine whether there is the potential for life beneath its surface, as is thought to be the case on icy moons around Jupiter and Saturn.

But a model of Ceres presented at the LPSC has added a wrinkle by suggesting comet-like behaviour is only possible at the poles of the dwarf planet, not the  [Image: dunno.gif] lower-latitude [Image: hmm2.gif] areas where the bright spot has been seen.

Comet jets and cryo-volcanoes

Timothy Titus of the US Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, presented a thermal model that examines where on the surface ice could remain stable over the life time of the solar system, rather than boiling away more quickly. If Ceres is acting like a comet, it must have ice patches that can survive for a long time before being heated by the sun as it moves into a warmer part of its orbit.

Titus found that ice could only be stable in regions above 40 degrees latitude. But the plumes spotted by Herschel seemed to come from nearer the equator, which implies they can't be comet-like. "The water ice is just not stable at the latitudes that the plumes are supposedly coming from," Titus says.

Another explanation is cryovolcanism, in which ice and water are forced out of the surface by processes similar to those that drive magma volcanoes on Earth. But according to a second model presented at the LPSC by David O'Brien of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, Ceres doesn't have enough muscle to drive these eruptions.

Water down deep

The idea is that Ceres has a subsurface ocean covered by an icy shell. As the bottom of the shell freezes, it expands, putting pressure on the ocean and the shell itself. In order to create a cryovolcano, says O'Brien, the water pressure needs to build up enough to launch up through the shell before the ice cracks and relieves the pressure.

We don't know exactly how deep the ice is on Ceres, so O'Brien tried a range of plausible depths. None produced the conditions for spewing cryovolcanoes – the ice always cracked before enough pressure built up. The best case scenario was water reaching about 90 per cent of the way to the surface.

Intriguingly, that means water could potentially reach the surface from a deep crater, where there was less ice to get through – perhaps even from a crater like the one where Dawn saw the bright spot. That doesn't mean there is a cryovolcano producing a massive plume, but it could be just enough to replenish the ice on the surface, countering the instability that Titus discovered.

So Ceres could be producing comet-like emissions in this region, driven by a weak cryovolcano. "It's sort of a midpoint between comets and cryovolcanic icy worlds," says Titus.

There is more than one way to make a cryovolcano, though. Some models suggest the core of Ceres may be heated by radioactive isotopes left over from the dwarf planet's formation. These could provide enough energy for punchier volcanism, perhaps producing larger plumes – and heat would of course be beneficial for any bacteria that may be lurking below the surface. "Any place you've got the potential for liquid water, you've got the potential for life," says Titus. "Ceres could be an extremely exciting astrobiological target."

Could heavy deuterium ice and normal ice clathrates as well as sodium ions and [glow=red,2,300]outgassing[/glow],
cause the charge dynamo of rotation to  make aural clouds and electric ice?  [Image: hmm2.gif]

Does the Dwarf Planet Ceres have a magnetic solid core?


Does the impact crater itself have a Mascon? [Image: dunno.gif]



Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#33
03-20-2015, 04:17 AM



Quote: Wrote:Does the impact crater itself have a Mascon?


On Ceres it seems doubtful.


Quote: Wrote:Does the Dwarf Planet Ceres have a magnetic solid core?


Does Ceres have a warm ocean as proposed for Europa and Enceladus? 


They keep us guessing while new images are somewhat non existent.
I am disappointed in that.

the flash in the pan was short lived


If we do get the prime time images in the near future,
then the surface of Ceres can be compared to the surfaces of Europa and Enceladus.

will we see this?
Reddish spots and shallow pits pepper the enigmatic ridged surface of Europa
[Image: 505373main_pia03878-600.jpg]



or this
Enceladus
[Image: PIA12207.jpg]


empty pockets full of speculation

[Image: dunno.gif]


On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#5

Ceres' Dawn
[Image: avatar_19.jpg?dateline=1430024178]
rhw007 [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 2,855
Threads: 141
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 0

#34
03-22-2015, 12:07 AM

If Ceres' DAWN spacecraft is now on the DARK side of Cere's where is the Infrared Imaging ???

[Image: blockines2.jpg]

We already KNOW how well Infrared Imaging of terrain can show "Blockines"  on Mars why not other things on other bodies in the Solar System?

Bob... [Image: reefer.gif] [Image: ninja.gif]
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album 
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.    
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007

Website Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#35
03-24-2015, 03:37 AM



Planetary Keri, she calls herself.


Quote: Wrote:I grew up loving meteorology 
and pretty much only watched the Weather Channel or The Little Mermaid.



On the Earth end of the Ceres mission,
this gal graduated in 2013 and is on top of the mission itself.
The quick follow up search on her led to an interesting site 
on 
women in planetary science  [Image: guitar.gif]


http://www.popsci.com/whats-next-dawn-mission-keri-bean

Quote: Wrote:We expect the hydrazine 
will run out sometime towards the end of 2016. 
After that, we will just become an artificial satellite around Ceres, 
a kind of moon.


Quote: Wrote:“Are you that girl that brought R2D2 to JPL?” 
Yes!



http://keribean.com/

Quote: Wrote:I graduated from Texas A&M University in August 2013 
with a master's in atmospheric sciences. 
My advisor was Dr. Mark Lemmon. 
I earned my B.S. in meteorology and double minors in mathematics and Earth sciences 
from Texas A&M University in spring 2010 
with designation of Undergraduate Research Scholar.



[Image: hmm2.gif] [Image: whip.gif]
https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpress.com/page/6/


going down the list of articles at Women in Planetary Science, 
.... a catharsis wrapped up in a conundrum ....

[Image: damned.gif]
https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpres...become-it/
Fake it Until You Become It

Quote: Wrote:I am often discussing with others 
about various aspects of how imposter syndrome [Image: rofl.gif] 
or lack of confidence [Image: whip.gif] 
may affect women in science.

It is nice to see some strategies for making positive changes in ones confidence.




[Image: whistle.gif]



Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#36
03-28-2015, 01:41 PM



This scientist has a blog that was reprinted here.
He begins some comparisons of Ceres to Dionne and Tethys.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blo...lurks.html

Quote: Wrote:The most intriguing linear features are arcuate grooves 
radiating from a large southern impact basin roughly 250 kilometers across. 
Although these could be tectonic, 
the arcuate shape is consistent with secondary impact features [Image: whip.gif] 
related to the formation of the basin. 
The key test will occur when we get 1-kilometer data or better 
and can examine the detailed morphology.

Here are some Cassini images of Tethys, 
shown similar to our views of Ceres 
in mid- and late-April. 
Smooth regions, many craters, and the largest fracture system, Ithaca Chasma 
are all very recognizable, but the small fractures and crater chains
across the surface are not yet apparent. 
By the last week of April we should be acquiring images of Ceres 
at resolutions of 1.3 kilometers, [Image: guitar.gif]
although at different phase angles 
as this 2-week-long RC3 phase goes to completion.


Tethys in enhanced color: south pole and southern Ithaca Chasma
[Image: 20150327_N1589080747_780_813_RGB_sharpen...d_f537.jpg]


On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#6
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#37
04-13-2015, 08:00 PM (This post was last modified: 04-13-2015, 08:11 PM by agrorithms.)



(03-09-2015, 02:29 AM)Vianova link Wrote: Wrote:Looking at the rotating Ceres image that EA just posted,
it looked like there were more of those white spots present in several places.
They did however look more faded,
or perhaps covering up slowly in dust.
For instance look in the upper left of Ceres,
for the crater with a fading white spot as it to comes around, 
then shortly after the larger brighter pair of spots appears below that.

'Dwarf planet' Ceres spawns giant mystery (Update)

2 hours ago 

[Image: dwarfplanetc.jpg]
This map-projected view of Ceres was created from images taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft during its initial approach to the dwarf planet, prior to being captured into orbit in March 2015. The map is an enhanced color view that offers an expanded range of the colors visible to human eyes. Scientists use this technique in order to highlight subtle color differences across Ceres. This can provide valuable insights into the physical properties and composition of materials on the surface. For example, scientists have not established clear connections between impact craters and the different colors visible here, but they are investigating this possibility. Images taken using blue (440 nanometers), green (550 nanometers) and infrared (920 nanometers) spectral filters were combined to create the map. The filters were assigned to color channels in reverse order, compared to natural color; in other words, the short-wavelength blue images were assigned to the red color channel and the long-wavelength infrared images are assigned to the blue color channel. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

Quote: Wrote:First classified a planet, then an asteroid and then a "dwarf planet" with some traits of a moon—the more scientists learn about Ceres, the weirder it becomes.

And new observations of the sphere of rock and ice circling our Sun between Mars and Jupiter have added to the mystery, researchers said Monday.

Astrophysicists have been looking to a $473-million (446-million-euro) mission to test theories that Ceres is a water-rich planetary "embryo"—a relic from the birth of the Solar System some 4.5 billion years ago.

But an early batch of data from NASA's Dawn probe, unveiled at a conference of the European Geosciences Union (EGU), may have made the Ceres riddle even greater.

In orbit around Ceres since March 6 after a seven-and-a-half-year trek, Dawn peered at two bright spots on its surface deemed to be telltales of its chemical and physical ID.

But instead of explaining the spots, analysis found the two seemed to "behave distinctly differently," said Federico Tosi, who works on Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR).

While Spot 1 is colder than its immediate surroundings, Spot 5 is not.

The spots are two of a known dozen or so which on photographs taken by Dawn resemble lights shining on a dull grey surface. 

Ceres travels at some 414 million kilometres (260 million miles) from the Sun, taking 4.61 Earth years to complete one orbit.

About 950 km (590 miles) wide, it is the biggest object in the asteroid belt—large enough for gravity to have moulded its shape into a ball. 

With VIR, the Dawn team have been able to put together images at different wavelengths of light, Tosi told journalists.

[Image: thisimageist.jpg]
This image is taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft of dwarf planet Ceres on February 19, 2015 from a distance of nearly 29,000 miles 

One picture, as seen by the human eye, shows Ceres as a "dark and brownish" ball with both white spots clearly visible.

But in thermal images, Spot 1 becomes a dark spot on a reddish ball, indicating it was cooler than the rest of the surface, said Tosi.

The "biggest surprise", he added, was that Spot 5 simply disappeared on the thermal image.

"For sure, we have bright spots on the surface of Ceres which, at least from a thermal perspective, seem to behave in different ways."

Theories about what the spots are range from ice to "hydrated minerals"—water not in pure ice form but absorbed by minerals. 

Ice would be difficult to explain, though, as Ceres inhabits a zone not quite distant enough from the Sun to allow "stable ice" on the surface, said Tosi of the National Institute for Astrophysics in Rome.

Missing craters

Just as intriguing is that Ceres is very unlike its near neighbour Vesta, an asteroid which Dawn studied in 2011 and 2012. 

Vesta is bright and reflects much of the Sun's light, while Ceres is dark—a contrast that says these bodies have experienced very different space odysseys.

[Image: thianasaimag.jpg]
Thia NASA image obtained on March 6, 2015 shows Ceres, taken by the Dawn spacecraft on March 1, just a few days before the mission achieved orbit 

The team also found fewer large craters on Ceres than observations of Vesta suggested they should.

"When we compared the size of the craters on Ceres with those on Vesta, we're missing a number of large craters, the number we would expect," said Christopher Russell, Dawn's principal investigator.

Pockmarks on the surface did, however, suggest Ceres had a "violent collisional history," said team member Martin Hoffman from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Goettingen, Germany.

Put together, the case for Ceres as a baby planet that never made it to adulthood remains, for now, in limbo.

[Image: 1-dwarfplanetc.jpg]
These images, from Dawn's visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR), highlight two regions on Ceres containing bright spots. The top images show a region scientists have labeled "1" and the bottom images show the region labeled "5." Region 5 contains the brightest spots on Ceres. VIR has been examining the relative temperatures of features on Ceres' surface. Preliminary examination suggests that region 1 is cooler than the rest of Ceres' surface, but region 5 appears to be located in a region that is similar in temperature to its surroundings. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/ASI/INAF

More may become clear in the coming months when Dawn, which until now has been on Ceres' dark side, moves closer to probe its surface composition and temperature.

The first object in the main asteroid belt to be discovered, Ceres was observed in 1801 by a Sicilian astronomer, Father Giuseppe Piazzi.

Believing he had seen a planet, Piazzi named his after the Roman goddess of harvests and Sicily's patron saint.

After more, but smaller objects turned up, Ceres was downgraded to an asteroid only to get a status boost in 2006, becoming a "dwarf planet."
http://phys.org/news/2015-04-dwarf-plane...t.html#jCp 

Quote: Wrote:[Image: dwarfplanetc.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#38
04-13-2015, 08:30 PM

...improv is as is was...


(03-10-2015, 05:04 PM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:[move]Dawn entered Orbit at  [Image: worship.gif] [glow=red,2,300]~3.33 AU[/glow] from Earth.  [Image: dance2.gif]  March 6, 2015[/move]

Now Thatza Present!

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#7
[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#39
04-13-2015, 08:40 PM (This post was last modified: 04-13-2015, 08:41 PM by agrorithms.)

"...scientists have not established clear connections between impact craters and the different colors visible here, but they are investigating this possibility."


(03-10-2015, 07:31 AM)watcher link Wrote: Wrote:I'm hedging on fresh impact crater. Shes located within the Kepler belt. Shes big, dense and has considerable gravitaional pull (Shape points to large enough mass to form spherical shape)..  Shes made of a lot of ice.

Heres an example of Lunar impact by us ;)
[Image: 141028214139-large.jpg]
Quote: Wrote:LRO has imaged the LADEE impact site on the eastern rim of Sundman V crater. The image was created by ratioing two images, one taken before the impact and another afterwards. The bright area highlights what has changed between the time of the two images, specifically the impact point and the ejecta.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University


[Image: dwarfplanetc.jpg]
This map-projected view of Ceres was created from images taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft during its initial approach to the dwarf planet, prior to being captured into orbit in March 2015. The map is an enhanced color view that offers an expanded range of the colors visible to human eyes. Scientists use this technique in order to highlight subtle color differences across Ceres. This can provide valuable insights into the physical properties and composition of materials on the surface. For example, scientists have not established clear connections between impact craters and the different colors visible here, but they are investigating this possibility. Images taken using blue (440 nanometers), green (550 nanometers) and infrared (920 nanometers) spectral filters were combined to create the map. The filters were assigned to color channels in reverse order, compared to natural color; in other words, the short-wavelength blue images were assigned to the red color channel and the long-wavelength infrared images are assigned to the blue color channel. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-dwarf-plane...t.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_661.jpg?dateline=1433826103]
Vianova [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,885
Threads: 48
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 1

#40
04-13-2015, 09:24 PM




OK, looking for alternatives to small impact craters,
assuming that the white spots {or most of them} are not impacts.

Maybe that "dusty" discolored surface is thicker than it is thought to be.
Maybe it has become a layer of permafrost, ... just under a deeper layer of dust
that is thawing from ... solar system warming ... subsurface warming in tandem?
which implicates the methane / clathrates.
and/or
salt and fresh water mixing in tandem, or ...

goes back to the Siberian hole

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/...s-science/

New Theory Behind Dozens of Craters Found in Siberia

Quote: Wrote:But the most plausible explanation seemed to be the explosive release 
of melting methane hydrate—
an ice-like material frozen in the Arctic ground—thanks to global warming.



Quote: Wrote:Now, scientists are arguing that the methane theory is unlikely, 
based on new satellite surveys released by Russian researchers 
that found dozens of new craters in Siberia



Quote: Wrote:"The jury is still out" on the cause of Siberia's craters, 
says Carolyn Ruppel, 
chief of the U.S. Geological Survey's Gas Hydrates Project. 
But she and other scientists 
say the new satellite mapping suggests another explanation 
that has to do with the rapid melting [Image: devil.gif]
of ice cores called pingos [Image: whip.gif]



I posted images of "pingo's" in the artificial vs. geologic
arguments on relic Mars land forms.


Quote: Wrote:A pingo is a plug of ice 
that forms near the surface over time and has a small mound or hill on top.



Quote: Wrote:When an ice plug melts rapidly—
as many have been, thanks to unseasonably warm temperatures in Siberia 
over the past year—
it can cause part of the ground to collapse, forming a crater. 
But that process alone isn't enough to explain the ejected rocks 
that have been found around the rim of the craters, 
which suggest some sort of explosion.


Instead, Ruppel theorizes that the craters were formed 
by a sudden release of natural gas 
that had been stored in the permafrost 
but was kept under pressure by the weight of the pingo.


This theory is bolstered by the Russian satellite data, 
which show pingos—they appear as small mounds—
in the exact positions where the craters later formed.



OK, can a small impact crater cause the development of a pingo?
Perhaps a some of the white spots are impacts and some are not?


This is the pingo image I posted awhile ago.
Though this is a more rapid melt scenario,
we don't know the dynamics of what causes heat on Ceres.
If we get some serious close-ups of Ceres, then we might eliminate speculation.
Looking at the last image posted of a white spot on Ceres,
we do see a mound like surrounding.

It is a Ceres pingo-pongo.  [Image: reefer.gif]



other:

http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestu...rn-russia/


How to Turn Ordinary Water into Explosive Gas That Goes KABOOM!
http://mad-science.wonderhowto.com/how-t...m-0140288/


http://mods-n-hacks.wonderhowto.com/how-...e-0137955/


Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#41
04-19-2015, 04:15 PM (This post was last modified: 04-19-2015, 04:30 PM by agrorithms.)

Dawn in excellent shape one month after Ceres arrival

Apr 07, 2015 by Elizabeth Landau 

[Image: dawninexcell.jpg]
Artist's concept of Dawn above Ceres around the time it was captured into orbit by the dwarf planet in early March(~3.33 AU from Earth March 6,2015). Since its arrival, the spacecraft turned around to point the blue glow of its ion engine in the opposite direction. Credit: NASA/JPL 

Quote: Wrote:Since its capture by the gravity of dwarf planet Ceres on March 6, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has performed flawlessly, continuing to thrust with its ion engine as planned. The thrust, combined with Ceres' gravity, is gradually guiding the spacecraft into a circular orbit around the dwarf planet. All of the spacecraft's systems and instruments are in excellent health.

Dawn has been following its planned trajectory on the dark side of Ceres—the side facing away from the sun—since early March. After it entered orbit, the spacecraft's momentum carried it to a higher altitude, reaching a maximum of 46,800 miles (75,400 kilometers) on March 18. Today, Dawn is about 26,000 miles (42,000 kilometers) above Ceres, descending toward the first planned science orbit, which will be 8,400 miles (13,500 kilometers) above the surface.

The next optical navigation images of Ceres will be taken on April 10 and April 14, and are expected to be available online after initial analysis by the science team. In the first of these, the dwarf planet will appear as a thin crescent, much like the images taken on March 1, but with about 1.5 times higher resolution. The April 14 images will reveal a slightly larger crescent in even greater detail. Once Dawn settles into the first science orbit on April 23, the spacecraft will begin the intensive prime science campaign.

By early May, images will improve our view of the entire surface, including the mysterious bright spots that have captured the imaginations of scientists and space enthusiasts alike. 

[Image: dn27099-2_1200.gif]

What these reflections of sunlight represent is still unknown, but closer views should help determine their nature. The regions containing the bright spots will likely not be in view for the April 10 images; it is not yet certain whether they will be in view for the April 14 set.


On May 9, Dawn will complete its first Ceres science phase and begin to spiral down to a lower orbit to observe Ceres from a closer vantage point.
  [Image: dance2.gif]

Dawn previously explored the giant asteroid Vesta for 14 months, from 2011 to 2012, capturing detailed images and data about that body.

More information: More details about Dawn's trajectory are available at: dawnblog.jpl.nasa.gov http://dawnblog.jpl.nasa.gov/ 

More information about Dawn is online at: dawn.jpl.nasa.gov  http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/

Provided by  Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
http://phys.org/news/2015-04-dawn-excell...s.html#jCp

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#42
04-19-2015, 04:20 PM


Dawn glimpses Ceres' north pole

10 hours ago 

[Image: dawnglimpses.gif]
This animation shows the north pole of dwarf planet Ceres as seen by the Dawn spacecraft on April 10, 2015. Dawn was at a distance of 21,000 miles (33,000 kilometers) when its framing camera took these images. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

After spending more than a month in orbit on the dark side of dwarf planet Ceres, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has captured several views of the sunlit north pole of this intriguing world. These images were taken on April 10 from a distance of21,000 miles (33,000 kilometers), and they represent the highest-resolution views of Ceres to date.

Subsequent images of Ceres will show surface features at increasingly better resolution.

Dawn arrived at Ceres on March 6, marking the first time a spacecraft has orbited a dwarf planet. Previously, the spacecraft explored giant asteroid Vesta for 14 months from 2011 to 2012. Dawn has the distinction of being the only spacecraft to orbit two extraterrestrial targets.

Ceres, with an average diameter of about 590 miles (950 kilometers), is the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Dawn has been using its ion propulsion system to maneuver to its first science orbit at Ceres, which it will reach on April 23. The spacecraft will remain at a distance of 8,400 miles (13,500 kilometers) from the dwarf planet until May 9. Afterward, it will make its way to lower orbits.

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-dawn-glimps...e.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_4.jpg?dateline=1433683445]
[b]Keith[/b] [Image: buddy_online.png] 
Hidden Mission Control
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 6,855
Threads: 298
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 3

#43
04-20-2015, 11:34 AM

[Image: dn27099-2_1200.gif]

that one's really worth looking at... much better than previous

It's a curious 'reflection' that does so in that manner.
I'm left with a major wtf? moment

Can't wait to see them and others deflate this as well.



Science embodies statements in degrees of certainty Some unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely sure.
Beliefs spawned from ignorance are equal to unintelligent skepticism.
Despite disputation- The truth shall set us all free, whether or not it's the truth you want to believe

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_19.jpg?dateline=1430024178]
rhw007 [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 2,855
Threads: 141
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 0

#44
04-20-2015, 11:20 PM

Didn't DAWN take ANY Spectrographic data with this visible information?  If it's safe enough to acquire photons in one spectrum what about all the others?  [Image: whistle.gif]

[Image: dunno.gif]

Bob... [Image: ninja.gif] [Image: reefer.gif]
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album 
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.    
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#45
04-20-2015, 11:43 PM (This post was last modified: 04-21-2015, 12:22 AM by agrorithms.)

(04-20-2015, 11:20 PM)rhw007 link Wrote: Wrote:Didn't DAWN take ANY Spectrographic data with this visible information?  If it's safe enough to acquire photons in one spectrum what about all the others?  [Image: whistle.gif]

[Image: dunno.gif]

Bob... [Image: ninja.gif] [Image: reefer.gif]


Two mysterious bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres are not alike

14:30 13 April 2015 by Jacob Aron

[Image: dn27328-1_300.jpg]
Feature five on Ceres is made up of two bright dots (Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

Quote: Wrote:The unidentified bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres have become more mysterious. The spots on the surface were first glimpsed close-up just a month ago, and now infrared images reveal that they have different thermal properties.

NASA's Dawn spacecraft is currently in orbit around the dwarf planet, which sits in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Mission scientists presented the latest results from the spacecraft at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, today.

Two spots on the surface, labelled feature one and feature five, show up in visible light images as very bright in comparison to the rest of Ceres's dull grey, leading to speculation that they could be the sites of watery volcanoes on the dwarf planet, also known as cryovolcanoes.

Now Federico Tosi, who works on Dawn's Visible and Infrared Spectrometer, has presented infrared images of the two spots, measuring their thermal properties. "What we have found is that bright spot number one corresponds to a dark spot in the thermal image," he said at a press conference today. In other words, the bright spot is much cooler than its surroundings.

In comparison, feature five, which appears as two separate bright spots next to each other in visible images, didn't show up in the infrared images. "Spot number five shows no distinct thermal behaviour," he said, meaning it is the same temperature as its surroundings. At the moment Dawn is too far away from Ceres to determine whether this is due to the bright spots being made from different stuff, or due to a different structure on the ground.

Hide the volcanoes

The spacecraft has just come out from behind the dark side of the dwarf planet, and a few days ago took a new image showing a sliver of the illuminated surface. Over the next couple of months Dawn will be zooming in for a closer look at the bright spots and the rest of the surface. It will also look for signs of watery plumes launching from the surface, as previously seen by the Herschel space telescope.

The current lack of high-resolution data means Tosi and his colleagues are hesitant to draw firm conclusion about the nature of these bright spots. "The current indication is there might be bright spots on the surface of Ceres behaving differently," he said. "Before invoking cryovolcanoes or something strange going on, we have to be prudent and rule out the easy possibilities."

Dawn has also uncovered other intriguing details about Ceres, such as a seeming lack of large craters on the surface. The spacecraft previously visited a smaller asteroid, Vesta, and the relative number and sizes of craters on both bodies should be similar – but they aren't, says Christopher Russell who leads the Dawn mission.

"When we compare the size of the craters with those we see on Vesta, we are missing a number of larger craters," he said. "That's something we've got to learn more about when we take the next stage of science data."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27...TW3c010yow 

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#46
04-21-2015, 12:01 AM (This post was last modified: 04-21-2015, 12:49 AM by agrorithms.)

Quote: Wrote:[move]"No top hat, but it has the tails (Image: NASA/JPL/USGS)"  [Image: reefer.gif][/move]

[Image: 16599016443_3c81dd6598_o.jpg]

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27...TW3eE10yow 


Recall:


(03-09-2015, 02:00 PM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:The only mechanism I can think of: [glow=red,2,300]plasmonics.
[/glow]
If this is not a mere "Reflection" of the sun off of ice or salt at an angle to the spacecraft is just a guess while we wait for more data.

Consider transient lunar phenomena.

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/ByC6SUf6WHQ[/flash]

Quote: Wrote:
Quote: Wrote:The Lunar Plasma Environment: Observations
from Apollo show that the surface of the Moon is electrically
charged [6]. The lunar dayside charges to ~
+10 V due to the photoemission of electrons by incident
solar UV/X-rays (i.e., loss of negative charge),
while the near-terminator region charges to ~ ?100 V
due to the higher fluxes of fast moving plasma electrons
compared with the slower moving plasma ions
(i.e., accumulation of negative charge) [1, 2, 6]. More
recently, observations from the Lunar Prospector Electron
Reflectometer (LP/ER) reveal that the Moon can
charge up to ~ ?4 kV during SEP events [7].
The near-surface plasma environment is further
complicated by the lunar wake and magnetic anomalies.
The lunar wake is a “void” that forms downstream
of the Moon in the solar wind and is filled with
tenuous hot electrons and ion beams [8]. The fundamental
plasma processes that form and re-fill the wake
are still not well understood [5]. Exactly how solar
wind plasma interacts with magnetic anomalies on the
lunar surface is very much an open question
 [5]. It is
possible that some anomalies can “stand-off” the solar
wind plasma and limit the space weathering of the underlying
regolith [9].
Impact on Exploration: Under certain conditions,
the resulting lunar surface electric fields could pose
electrostatic discharge (ESD) hazards to robotic and
human explorers [5]. 

[Image: equatorial-ionization-anomaly-plasma-fountain.jpg]

The greatest ESD risk is anticipated
to occur near the terminator and on the nightside,
since this is where the extreme lunar charging has been
observed, and it is likely much more difficult for objects
to reach a common electrical “ground” at these
locations.

It almost seems as if Bright-Spots A,B. flick on like a flourescent neon sign.
At the Day / Night Terminator. [Image: damned.gif]
[Image: dn27099-2_1200.gif]
The greatest ESD risk is anticipated to occur near the terminator and on the nightside,
since this is where the extreme lunar charging has been observed


Could heavy deuterium ice and normal ice clathrates as well as sodium ions and outgassing,
cause the charge dynamo of rotation to  make aural clouds and [glow=red,2,300]electric ice[/glow]?  [Image: hmm2.gif]

Does the Dwarf Planet Ceres have a magnetic solid core?
Does the impact crater itself have a Mascon? [Image: dunno.gif]

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/g9Lw2oV7nSc[/flash]

Skip to 5:50 minute mark on video below.

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/oZdQJi-UwYs[/flash]

A flash- precipitated salt crystal??? [Image: bricks.gif]









"This is something that should be applicable to any airless bodies," says Colaprete. 

Quote: Wrote:The Low Pressure Sodium Lamp:

Discharge tube operates at a pressure of .13 - 1.3 Pascal(0.00001 or less standard atmospheres)




The moon's got two tails â€“ and its friends might too -Possibly Ceres
[Image: dance2.gif]

19:00 31 March 2015 by Jacob Aron

[Image: dn27275-1_300.jpg]
No top hat, but it has the tails (Image: NASA/JPL/USGS)
[Image: DuckTales_(Main_title).jpg]

Quote: Wrote:The man in the moon must be wearing a tailcoat. Turns out, our satellite has two tails of particles streaming in its wake. If the same is true of other bodies in the solar system, it could give us a way to study their surfaces without having to land.

Data from NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), which spent seven months orbiting the moon in 2013 and 2014, has revealed a tail of nanoscale dust particles.

The finding follows the discovery of the first lunar tail in 1999, when ground-based telescopes spotted a faint stream of sodium gas stretching out behind the moon for hundreds of thousands of kilometres.

Anthony Colaprete, who is in charge of LADEE's spectrometer instrument, wanted to get a closer look at the sodium tail, so positioned LADEE on the dark side of the moon and pointed it away from the sun. The spectrometer works by looking at the patterns of light wavelengths that different substances emit or reflect. In this position, the instrument picked up the sodium, but there also seemed to be something else, a brighter signal in the blue and ultraviolet wavelengths.

Telling tails 

After eliminating other possibilities, the team found that the best explanation for their signal was a tail of dust grains, each around 10 nanometres in size, trailing away from the moon for thousands of kilometres. "We think it is a robust observation," says Colaprete, who presented the work at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) in The Woodlands, Texas, on 16 March.

These grains are too small to be seen by LADEE's Lunar Dust Experiment, which is designed to collect floating dust particles. There is also no chance of seeing the tail from Earth since the particles are very spread out, with less than a thousandth of a gram of material per square metre. But Jack Schmitt, who was an astronaut on the Apollo 17 mission, attended the LPSC session and said he thought the dust tail could explain a strange glow the crew observed from orbit at lunarsunrise.
[Image: rooster-crowing-2.jpg]
Sunrise is the terminator zone-EA


But how is this dust getting so far away from the moon? Colaprete thinks asteroids crashing into the lunar surface are throwing up tiny particles, and then radiation pressure from the sun is pushing them further away, which is why the tail is in the opposite direction to the sun.

If the same process is at work elsewhere in the solar system, it could offer a new way to study the surfaces of other bodies: collect their tails rather than landing on them. "This is something that should be applicable to any airless bodies," says Colaprete. This includes asteroids, the moons of Mars and the dwarf planet Ceres. "If you could gather it over time, you could analyse it as a measure of the surface."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27...TW3eE10yow




"Spot number five shows no distinct thermal behaviour," 
he said, meaning it is the same temperature as its surroundings. -Tosi / Ceres

"If you could gather it over time, you could analyse it as a measure of the surface." -Colaprete / Possibly Ceres


Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#47
04-21-2015, 01:21 AM (This post was last modified: 04-21-2015, 01:27 AM by agrorithms.)

(02-06-2015, 03:08 AM)EA link Wrote: Wrote:[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/-1QWMQTTKPE[/flash]

Nice Albedo Point...I wonder what latitude?

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/lBR0sRqy7wM[/flash]

[Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif] [Image: dance2.gif]

This is gonna be exciting. [Image: reefer.gif]



It ex-cites itzelf.
As cliff-hanging of a scenario like we were S33ING Philae in ST3R3O to compare ya know...  [Image: dunno.gif]

[move]http://keithlaney.net/SMF/index.php?topic=15630.0  :duck:  [/move]


[Image: naughty.gif] No top hat, but it has the tails  [Image: dance2.gif]


 

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_29.jpg?dateline=1430024039]
EA [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 5,305
Threads: 96
Joined: Jan 2006 
Reputation: 3

#48
04-22-2015, 01:48 AM (This post was last modified: 04-22-2015, 01:51 AM by agrorithms.)

Ceres' bright spots come back into view

16 hours ago by Elizabeth Landau 

click: "Refresh" for animated gif of ceres bright spots below
[Image: ceresbrights.gif]
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA 

Quote: Wrote:The two brightest spots on dwarf planet Ceres, which have fascinated scientists for months, are back in view in the newest images from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Dawn took these images on April 14 and 15 from a vantage point 14,000 miles (22,000 kilometers) above Ceres' north pole.

The images show the brightest spot and its companion clearly standing out against their darker surroundings, but their composition and sources are still un-known. Scientists also see other interesting features, including heavy cratering. As Dawn gets closer to Ceres, surface features will continue to emerge at in-creasingly better resolution.

Dawn has now finished delivering the images that have helped mission planners maneuver the spacecraft to its first science orbit and prepare for subsequent ob-servations. All of the approach operations have executed flawlessly and kept Dawn on course and on schedule. Beginning April 23, Dawn will spend about three weeks in a near-circular orbit around Ceres, taking observations from 8,400 miles (13,500 kilometers) above the surface. On May 9, Dawn will begin to make its way to lower orbits to improve the view and provide higher-resolution observa-tions.

"The approach imaging campaign has completed successfully by giving us a pre-liminary, tantalizing view of the world Dawn is about to start exploring in detail. It has allowed us to start asking some new and intriguing questions," said Marc Rayman, Dawn's mission director and chief engineer, based at NASA's Jet Pro-pulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

On March 6, Dawn became the first spacecraft to orbit a dwarf planet, and the first to orbit two extraterrestrial targets. Scientists will be comparing Ceres to giant asteroid Vesta, which Dawn studied from 2011 to 2012, in order to gain insights about the formation of our solar system. Both Vesta and Ceres, located in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, were on their way to becoming planets before their development was interrupted.

More information: For more information about Dawn, visit dawn.jpl.nasa.gov Provided by  Jet Propulsion Laboratory
http://phys.org/news/2015-04-ceres-bright-view.html#jCp 

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...

Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_4.jpg?dateline=1433683445]
[b]Keith[/b] [Image: buddy_online.png] 
Hidden Mission Control
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 6,855
Threads: 298
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 3

#49
04-23-2015, 11:49 PM (This post was last modified: 04-23-2015, 11:52 PM by Anonymous.)

Ceres' Bright Spots Come Back Into View


April 20, 2015—The two brightest spots on dwarf planet Ceres, which have fascinated scientists for months, are back in view in the newest images from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Dawn took these images on April 14 and 15 from a vantage point 14,000 miles (22,000 kilometers) above Ceres' north pole.

An animation and still image are available here:http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA19064

[Image: PIA19064_700.gif]

The images show the brightest spot and its companion clearly standing out against their darker surroundings, but their composition and sources are still unknown. Scientists also see other interesting features, including heavy cratering. As Dawn gets closer to Ceres, surface features will continue to emerge at increasingly better resolution.

Dawn has now finished delivering the images that have helped mission planners maneuver the spacecraft to its first science orbit and prepare for subsequent observations. All of the approach operations have executed flawlessly and kept Dawn on course and on schedule. Beginning April 23, Dawn will spend about three weeks in a near-circular orbit around Ceres, taking observations from 8,400 miles (13,500 kilometers) above the surface. On May 9, Dawn will begin to make its way to lower orbits to improve the view and provide higher-resolution observations.

"The approach imaging campaign has completed successfully by giving us a preliminary, tantalizing view of the world Dawn is about to start exploring in detail. It has allowed us to start asking some new and intriguing questions," said Marc Rayman, Dawn's mission director and chief engineer, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

On March 6, Dawn became the first spacecraft to orbit a dwarf planet, and the first to orbit two extraterrestrial targets. Scientists will be comparing Ceres to giant asteroid Vesta, which Dawn studied from 2011 to 2012, in order to gain insights about the formation of our solar system. Both Vesta and Ceres, located in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, were on their way to becoming planets before their development was interrupted.

Dawn's mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Dawn is a project of the directorate's Discovery Program, managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. UCLA is responsible for overall Dawn mission science. Orbital ATK, Inc., in Dulles, Virginia, designed and built the spacecraft. The German Aerospace Center, the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, the Italian Space Agency and the Italian National Astrophysical Institute are international partners on the mission team. For a complete list of acknowledgements, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/
Science embodies statements in degrees of certainty Some unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely sure.
Beliefs spawned from ignorance are equal to unintelligent skepticism.
Despite disputation- The truth shall set us all free, whether or not it's the truth you want to believe

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_19.jpg?dateline=1430024178]
rhw007 [Image: buddy_offline.png] 
Posting Freak
[Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png][Image: star.png]

Posts: 2,855
Threads: 141
Joined: Dec 2005 
Reputation: 0

#50
04-24-2015, 09:40 PM

Cast Your Vote in 'Bright Spot' Mystery

Can you guess what's creating those mysterious bright spots on Ceres?
Cast your vote in the new poll from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that lets kids, adults, scientists – anyone! -- weigh in on what those spots could be.

Vote at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/dawn/world_ceres/

Bob...  [Image: ninja.gif]   [Image: reefer.gif]
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album 
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.    
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007

Website Find
Reply

[Image: avatar_52.jpg?dateline=1429826092]
[size=medium][color=#cc00cc][b]Wook
[/b] [img]https://web.archive.org/web/20150723092134im_/http://thehiddenmission.com/forum/images/buddy_offline.
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#8
no posts past this point, go to next page
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#9
``
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#10
space
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#11
1
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#12
2
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#13
3
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#14
4
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#15
5
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#16
6
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#17
7
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#18
8
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#19
9
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#20
0
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#21
`
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#22
11
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#23
12
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#24
13
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#25
14
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#26
15
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#27
16
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#28
17
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#29
18
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#30
19
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#31
20
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#32
21
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#33
22
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)