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NASA scans all original Apollo films
#1
This is something I've pushed for so long I've forgotten when I started-

 Everyone that's ever tried to study the Apollo photos in the computer age has inevitably hit a techno-wall
(this-wall being the fact that you just couldn't find them in any real quality, quantity, or consistency)
This problem was mainly due to their being analog sourced actual films, which aren't readily available and easily accessed,
as well as a lack of any coherent digitized record.

Sure there are NASA space imaging repositories, and you could order what photos you wanted, but the result would inevitably be a low generation copy.
This is because they don't take the original films out very often, no- not at all, they're priceless, fragile, and demand preservation.
They were taken out on extreme rarity to refresh the repositories' aging stock, but even then getting a good low generation copy was both rare and costly.

 There were 20 versions of some images, zero of most, copies of copies of copies, incomplete NASA and amateur archives full of inconsistentencies
enough to drive an amateur (or professional) researcher slap batty. Digitally, that meant scanned from such and in a myriad degrees of quality,
hardly any of which fit to compare to the actual films taken by the astronauts.

Well all that's well on the way to being over.

These are all the Apollo Metric and Panoramic Camera images
and they are done the right way.
Every one of these is a first gen image, scanned straight from the cold room original films

http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/apollo/browse

You have never seen the moon until you've downloaded one of the large Panoramic raw scan tiles and looked around.
the zoomify image you see displayed rolled up to full size is like a thumbnail compared to the raw scans
These images are bigger than your house, and clear as a bell. (although the raws do need a little contrast tweaking to be accurate)

Better yet, they're to start scanning the handheld films in the near future,
the plan is to do this with ALL the Apollo analog films.
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#2
Quote:Better yet, they're to start scanning the handheld films in the near future,

the plan is to do this with ALL the Apollo analog films.


Applause

Hard to believe they are actually doing this, but then given what's in the Hassleblad pics it's hard to believe they have left it all up on the web anyway. Hope they get it done soon, it will keep me occupied over the dark months.
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#3
trust me, there's not enough dark months in the year to go over just the panoramics sufficiently
each panoramic raw image is split into eight tiles, each tile being some 25000 x 39000 pixels
and there are THOUSANDS of whole images done in this manner, some 4700+ to be more precise
You should see what's in them.
I've been spellbound for weeks

It will make your computer grunt a bit to open the raw tiles, each one is a 1.9 gb tiff
mine handles them just fine, but I've got a pretty awesome rig.
If you're working with old tech or little ram, don't even try it.

I find it easier to download the tiles I select using the zoomify to browse,
then once downloaded, I crop all the edges off and save it as a low comp jpeg or non optimized png. makes them easier to handle and doesn't mess them up
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#4
How much Ram would you recommend Keith? I have 8gb at the moment, which is fine for my day to day needs, but for imaging?
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#5
8 gigs of ram will probably work fine, so long as you have a decent processor and plenty of space. Set your virtual memory to highest settings.
allow your imaging program plenty of time to do it's thing when working on these, it's too easy to get impatient and think your computer's frozen while it's simply doing it's job
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#6
I have an Intel I5 3570K@3.6ghz its a black edition and I can set it up that it goes up to 4ghz when needed. My Graphic card is a Radeon 7870 Myst edition with 2GB of Ram, I´m hoping that is ok?
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#7
yes, that's not far below what I'm running. good going!
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#8
I'll still be here this time next year then, Inteli3 3.10 Ghz, 8Gb RAM, Radeon 5450 1Gb RAM.

I've tried most of the freebie imaging programs and they could all do with a progress indicator so you know it's not hanging or frozen. There could be more by now but everyone's too busy taking selfies with their watches to look at in their spectacles on Android.
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#9
Hi everyone. If I remember correctly, the archive was unavailable during the 2013 govt. shutdown, and I suppose the possibility of another one continues to loom. Fantastic news, though.
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#10
Hi Todd,

damn gov't shutdown nonsense.. why would a website be shut down due to that? what, time warner cuts their cable off for non payment, the power companies cut the lines to the automated servers?
Lol
 Me and the wife went to Charleston for a little vacation at that time- wanted to visit Ft Sumter.
Nope. gov't shutdown
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#11
The Mother Lode of NASA Apollo HD Images Has Just Been Dumped on the Internet
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Posted by red pill junkie at 18:07, 05 Oct 2015
[url=http://dailygrail.com/sites/dailygrail.com/files/storyimages/21037483754_c408be2b98_z.jpg][Image: 21037483754_c408be2b98_z-500x491.jpg]

It's like Xmas in October --and no, I ain't talking about my birthday-- thanks to the release of THOUSANDS of high-resolution photographs taken by NASA during the age of the Apollo missions, between 1961 and 1972.
Those images were taken by the Apollo astronauts using Hasselblad 500EL data cameras, equipped with special IMAX-like, 70mm thin-based film produced by Kodak, which is the equivalent of 12,000 lines of digital resolution --the perfect excuse to finally get that new iMac with 5k Retina display next Black Friday!
Project Apollo Archive, which contains over 8400 pics in total, is being curated by Kipp Teague, who founded it since 1999.
Quote:"Around 2004, Johnson Space Center began re-scanning the original Apollo Hasseelblad camera film magazines, and Eric Jones and I began obtaining TIFF (uncompressed, high-resolution) versions of these new scans on DVD," Teague tells The Planetary Society. "These images were processed for inclusion on our websites, including adjusting color and brightness levels, and reducing the images in size to about 1000 dpi (dots per inch) for the high-resolution versions." Because there was so much demand for higher-resolution versions, Teague decided to reprocess the entire set and upload them to Flickr magazine by magazine.

[Image: 21648755432_74dbd6c9bf_z-500x491.jpg]
[Image: 21473324849_19dc7643a2_z-500x491.jpg][Image: 21926292752_b4ab223fcc_k-500x523.jpg]
[NOTE: These are **not** the best-resolution versions available on the archive]
Teague hopes to further expand the archive to 13,000 by the end of this week --but you can start looking for the wires on the lunar landing's movie set right now!
http://dailygrail.com/Straight-Science/2...e-Internet
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#12
I wouldn't exactly call Kipp Teague's Apollo collection (which is what this is, NOT NASA) a mother lode, much less THE mother lode

It's FAR from complete, and it's far from what's planned for the Apollo photos.
There were more than 16000 Hasselblad images alone, there were another 11000 or so metric and panoramic camera photos also, and various other handheld cameras.
You can find all but the Hasselblad images here, http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/

It's admirable he's managed to cobble together a little over half of the Hasselblads, a herculean effort for the time in which he did it... But...

these are more like browse images you'd look at to scout which Apollo images to look into closer once http://apollo.sese.asu.edu
gets the cold room storage original negatives scanned properly and online.

I corresponded to the Apollo Image Archive about a month ago just to make sure, and was told that official scanning of the cold storage Hasselblad imagery is next.
and they won't be little web versions, I'll guarantee you that
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#13
Keith!!!
 
Carlotto's LilD   back in action!?!?!?  Holycowsmile



Uploads
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#14
Mark Carlotto comes late to the table with his little casserole

We've been looking at this area for some time, Ananda Sirensena most certainly did not "discover" it.

That would be rather one of Will Farrar's group members

http://whatsupinthesky.com/index.php/201...c-missions
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#15
Okay,copy that.

I was just happy to see he is active.

I thought he gave up. Cry
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#16
We've tried to get him on the show and otherwise involve him in current anomalism and he's just always seemed uninterested
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#17
There are NASA/JSC/ASU 5700 x 5800 raw tif scans from Apollo 70mm Hasselblads up here. They're not complete, but there is a lot up. 

http://tothemoon.ser.asu.edu/gallery/apollo
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#18
when using those make sure to get the raw scan, they're like different images compared to the browse and full res
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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