Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
More Structures Artificial in Appearance, AS15-P-0347
#1
A large complex of structures sit atop a plateau near the crater Neper in the Apollo Panoramic AS15-P-0347. The image below was processed from the NASA/JSC/ASU raw tif tile 3.

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0003B1.png]

Below, the same structures from AS15-P-0342. The contrast is higher than AS15-P-0347, but it provides an alternate perspective of the objects. The image below was processed from the NASA/JSC/ASU raw tif tile 3.

[Image: AS15-P-0342_0003B2.png]
NASA/JSC/Arizona State University Original

Nearby, there is a large round mountainous hill with some most unusual details present. Below a thumbnail version of the hill, as seen in AS15-P-0347. All the images below were processed from the NASA/JSC/ASU raw tif tile 6.

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a0.png]

Below, a closer look at the mountain detail. For orientation purposes, these images below were rotated 180°.

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a1.png]

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a2.png] 

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a3.png]

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a4.png]

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a5.png]
NASA/JSC/Arizona State University Original
Reply
#2
all of those are great todd, but images 1,2 and 3 are exceptional!
makes it all worth downloading and working with those huge tiffs doesn't t/
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#3
...

I put some time and energy into trying to see what you see.
Your links sometimes go to photobucket rather than the nice large png's,
but eventually I got the good large, but over bright images.

Image one and two are essentially the same.
In all the others I saw nothing that was convincing in artificiality, but excellent lunar landscapes.

I assume that I could see what you see in images one and two,
so I took the potential and played with magnifications etc.
The big problem is that the original resolution sucks, 
and the bad angle of light in those images casting inconvenient shadows.
The one area that had some visual structural componentry in appearance is interesting and appropriate enough,
but one had to really concentrate on maintaining the proper perspective on the target site,
with often reversals in visual depth percetion occuring.
But nonetheless once focused the possibility maintains itself well enough.
However when flipping or rotating the image, the entire perspective changes beyond any recognition,
and that is always a key in determinating the original bad resolution from what might be a good possibility.
i tried to clean up the magnification and over brightness of original image, but resolution still sucks.

The best chance for "ruins" would be just left of center along the dark cliffside, 
with geometric walled like features apparent ...
just to the left of the two peaks with the huge shadowed areas below them, ... if you catch the proper perspective.
If so, then rotate or flip the image and watch it turn into something completely different.
 
http://i.imgur.com/BsZgS1I.jpg

[Image: BsZgS1I.jpg]
Reply
#4
(09-15-2015, 03:24 AM)Keith Wrote: all of those are great todd, but images 1,2 and 3 are exceptional!
makes it all worth downloading and working with those huge tiffs doesn't t/
Yes, 1&2 are quite something, a lot of detail and pretty obvious. The bottom 5 are details from 3, just rotated. I processed a section of South Massif from AS17-P-2314 recently and rotated the image to position it to how the astronauts might have seen it on the ground, and the details have a similar appearance (below). Besides the structural elements, they appear decorated on a large scale.
Food-smiley-004  
[Image: 4t2cvrp1.png]
NASA/JSC/Arizona State University Original

Well Vianova, I suppose it's subjective, being a photograph and all. Split_spawn
Reply
#5
Todd, V is a top notch analyst, and one of the hardest people I've ever found to convince of anomaly that both has an open mind but skeptical disposition. I find his observations priceless as pertaining to what the educated and "uninterested' observer sees in the things we post, as well his geological knowledge is a boon to us all.

listen to him, he'll help hone your skills to a sharp edge.

I personally see anomaly all over those, but that's my role,

:)

as well V, Todd is top notch also, he's looking into areas via new imagery that frankly i haven't the time to review in full right now being dedicated to other projects.

Welcome to THM Todd, in case I'd not welcomed you officially yet.
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#6
Thanks, I can only reference and rely on my own personal experience when interpreting what's in some of these images. Most of them don't really have scientific value to me but I view them as really good circumstantial evidence, so I generally don't have a crisis of conscience in saying something looks "engineered." I'm sure my method would benefit from knowledge here and I welcome any legitimate critique.
Reply
#7
...

"engineered"

termites engineer their mounds,
humans engineer their buildings

point being that "structure" is not necessarily a geometric construct with classic angular features

alien is alien

the push is for humanesque alien forms,
and that is probably a high percentage of possibilities in any UFO or anomaly

better keep in perspective all other possibilities especially on the other planets and moons

you also have to scrutinize a geologic possibility that may have a predominance over an artificial one

This is where most anomalists fail because they have virtually no geology study of land formation processes,
and on most of the areas you posted images of I see lunar geology

I would not have wasted my time with posting an image if I thought the site I posted was not anomalous enough.

In that regard, being ultra conservative in ferreting out artificial possibilities makes for better analysis in the long run,
though I have learned to be more patient with many proposals of artificiality,
as evidences accumulate over a wider spectrum on a planet or moon.

I suppose the best question to ask is,
when you see a prospect for artificiality or alien construct that has a possible natural construct,
do you go and try and find a geologic comp?
If you did, you may find that a lot of anomalies have a high statistical chance of being geologic as well.

ie .... what does NASA say is there? is it lava flows? 
If so, look to see that kind of geology from space or from an aerial distance.

The problem is AGE of the construct and erosion, .... and / or just plain questionable resolution of the image.
On the moon and Mars we have a much better chance of seeing something vastly ancient than on Earth.

One problem I have with your conclusion is that you see the artificiality encompassing too wide of an area.
Where does the artificiality end and the geology begin then?

Your images 1 and 2 had interesting perspective, but it was lost when flipping or rotating the image.
I still am pondering the site however and think that it was a good find.
Reply
#8
...

Mars .... anomalies or lava geology?
[Image: space-042712-001a.jpg]




how to butcher images into artificial appearances -- alemos does this a lot with reverse color and over manipulations

http://i.imgur.com/NGHxbuS.jpg
[Image: NGHxbuS.jpg]



https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736...20696f.jpg

columnar basalt joints
[Image: da15619c0b6bffe4144f39c7619d3848.jpg]

[Image: keenpress_columnar_basalt_volcanic_rock_...=473&h=355]


here is the alemos image of the LM that he called 'edge algorithm'
in which I have reversed colored his ... reverse color image Whip
to get the true  proper color perspective with the black areas on the sides and the proper landform fluted reliefs,
with some other slight enhancements as well,
and looks like I over sharpened
[Image: nJkVxN6.jpg]



as opposed to his reverse  color of the LM with "edge algorithm"

[Image: DxjEa3.jpg]


point being that I have butchered an already butchered image,
and though that butchered image was quite interesting in perspective,
it then points to over enhancing and over manipulating,
or over interpreting originally low or bad resolution images,
becoming a prescription for problems Whip
when the high res images come in 

Hmm2

....
Reply
#9
swirls in polygonal terrain.. that's pretty far out.
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#10
(09-15-2015, 04:46 AM)ToddA Wrote:
(09-15-2015, 03:24 AM)Keith Wrote: all of those are great todd, but images 1,2 and 3 are exceptional!
makes it all worth downloading and working with those huge tiffs doesn't t/
Yes, 1&2 are quite something, a lot of detail and pretty obvious. The bottom 5 are details from 3, just rotated. I processed a section of South Massif from AS17-P-2314 recently and rotated the image to position it to how the astronauts might have seen it on the ground, and the details have a similar appearance (below). Besides the structural elements, they appear decorated on a large scale.
Food-smiley-004  
[Image: 4t2cvrp1.png]
NASA/JSC/Arizona State University Original

Well Vianova, I suppose it's subjective, being a photograph and all. Split_spawn

south massif is awesome, no doubt. would it surprise you to know i found 2 more on the moon pretty much just like it?
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#11
Swirls ?
I been thinking on those all afternoon
lol.
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#12
Quote: would it surprise you to know i found 2 more on the moon pretty much just like it?

It would certainly interest me. All the mountains around the Taurus/Littrow area fascinate me.
Reply
#13
Hi Todd,welcome.

I don't know if this will aide you any but may be pertinent to your area of interest.

There is a Global map included so you should be able to scrutinise this  gravitic contraction of the lunar crust.
Quote:sampled in areas with dimensions of 40° longitude by 20° latitude and scaled by the total length of the fault scarps in the sampled areas.


In any case it is the Current science of the day and we all just learned it here together in your thread.Enjoy.
Quote:Boulders in the crater have aligned in rows that parallel the orientation of the fault scarp.


LRO discovers Earth's pull is 'massaging' our moon

September 15, 2015 by Nancy Neal-Jones

[Image: lrodiscovers.jpg]
Thousands of young, lobate thrust fault scarps have been revealed in Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images (LROC). Lobate scarps like the one shown here are like stair-steps in the landscape formed when crustal materials are pushed together, break and are thrust upward along a fault forming a cliff. Cooling of the still hot lunar interior is causing the Moon to shrink, but the pattern of orientations of the scarps indicate that tidal forces are contributing to the formation of the young faults. Credit: NASA/LRO 

Earth's gravity has influenced the orientation of thousands of faults that form in the lunar surface as the moon shrinks, according to new results from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft.

In August, 2010, researchers using images from LRO's Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) reported the discovery of 14 cliffs known as "lobate scarps" on the moon's surface, in addition to about 70 previously known from the limited high-resolution Apollo Panoramic Camera photographs. Due largely to their random distribution across the surface, the science team concluded that the moon is shrinking.
These small faults are typically less than 6.2 miles (10 kilometers) long and only tens of yards or meters high. They are most likely formed by global contraction resulting from cooling of the moon's still hot interior. As the interior cools and portions of the liquid outer core solidify, the volume decreases; thus the moon shrinks and the solid crust buckles.
Now, after more than six years in orbit, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) has imaged nearly three-fourths of the lunar surface at high resolution, allowing the discovery of over 3,000 more of these features. These globally distributed faults have emerged as the most common tectonic landform on the moon. An analysis of the orientations of these small scarps yielded a surprising result: the faults created as the moon shrinks are being influenced by an unexpected source—gravitational tidal forces from Earth.

[Image: nasaslrodisc.gif]
The gravitational forces the moon and sun exert are responsible for Earth's rising and falling tides. Earth's gravity also exerts forces on the Moon in the form of solid body tides that distort its shape. The Moon is slowly receding away from Earth and forces build as the moon's tidal distortion diminishes with distance and its rotation period slows with time. These tidal forces combined with the shrinking of the moon from cooling of its interior have influenced the pattern of orientations in the network of young fault scarps. Credit: NASA/LRO

Global contraction alone should generate an array of thrust faults with no particular pattern in the orientations of the faults, because the contracting forces have equal magnitude in all directions. "This is not what we found," says Smithsonian senior scientist Thomas Watters of the National Air and Space Museum in Washington. "There is a pattern in the orientations of the thousands of faults and it suggests something else is influencing their formation, something that's also acting on a global scale—'massaging' and realigning them." Watters is lead author of the paper describing this research published in the October issue of the journal Geology.
The other forces acting on the moon come not from its interior, but from Earth. These are tidal forces. When the tidal forces are superimposed on the global contraction, the combined stresses should cause predictable orientations of the fault scarps from region to region. "The agreement between the mapped fault orientations and the fault orientations predicted by the modeled tidal and contractional forces is pretty striking," says Watters.


"The discovery of so many previously undetected tectonic features as our LROC high-resolution image coverage continues to grow is truly remarkable," said Mark Robinson of Arizona State University, coauthor and LROC principal investigator. "Early on in the mission we suspected that tidal forces played a role in the formation of tectonic features, but we did not have enough coverage to make any conclusive statements. Now that we have NAC images with appropriate lighting for more than half of the moon, structural patterns are starting to come into focus."

[Image: 1-lrodiscovers.jpg]
The map shows the locations of over 3,200 lobate thrust fault scarps (red lines) on the Moon. The black double arrows show the average orientations of the lobate scarps sampled in areas with dimensions of 40° longitude by 20° latitude and scaled by the total length of the fault scarps in the sampled areas. The pattern of the black double arrows (orientation vectors) indicates that the fault scarps do not have random orientations as would be expected if the forces that formed them were from global contraction alone. Mare basalt units are shown in tan. Credit: NASA/LRO

The fault scarps are very young - so young that they are likely still actively forming today. The team's modeling shows that the peak stresses are reached when the moon is farthest from Earth in its orbit (at apogee). If the faults are still active, the occurrence of shallow moonquakes related to slip events on the faults may be most frequent when the moon is at apogee. This hypothesis can be tested with a long-lived lunar seismic network.
"With LRO we've been able to study the moon globally in detail not yet possible with any other body in the solar system beyond Earth, and the LRO data set enables us to tease out subtle but important processes that would otherwise remain hidden," said John Keller, LRO Project Scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.


[Image: 2-lrodiscovers.jpg]
A prominent lobate fault scarp in the Vitello Cluster is one of thousands discovered in Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images (LROC). Topography derived from the LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) stereo images shows a degraded crater has been uplift as the fault scarp has formed (blues are lower elevations and reds are higher elevations). Boulders in the crater have aligned in rows that parallel the orientation of the fault scarp. Credit: NASA/LRO

Launched on June 18, 2009, LRO has collected a treasure trove of data with its seven powerful instruments, making an invaluable contribution to our knowledge about the moon. LRO is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, under the Discovery Program, managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC.

[Image: 3-lrodiscovers.jpg]
 Explore further: Incredible shrinking moon is revealed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Provided by: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-09-lro-earth-m...n.html#jCp

Eye work for you.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#14
Thanks EA, that info is significant. It seems somewhat connected to this story, but I'm not completely sure how. ASU seems quite invested in the moon and sometimes, they're not that subtle. I've gone into some older threads on here over the past few days and you have a unique perspective that I find extraordinarily important. Personally, I find when the moon is about 5 or 6 days before the full phase, that's usually the craziest, most tense day of the month I experience. Then as the full moon approaches, it eases up just a little. When the phase passes, things go back to normal fairly quickly. I often wonder if I recognize a pattern or am I just strangely superstitious. Hmm2
Reply
#15
Thanks Todd.


I didn't put the moon there... Arrow


The Moon at perigee

Sun, 27 Sep 2015 at
19:46 CST
(11 days away)
01:46 UTC
Dominic Ford, Editor
From the Moon feed


The Moon will reach the closest point along its orbit to the Earth, and as a result will appear slightly larger than at other times. This close approach will occur when the Moon is almost at full phase, and so it will appear unusually large and bright – a sight that is sometimes dubbed a[i]supermoon.
[/i]

The Moon's distance from the Earth varies because its orbit is not perfectly circular – it is instead slightly oval-shaped, tracing out a path called an ellipse.

As the Moon traverses this elliptical path around the Earth each month, its distance varies by around 10%, between 363,000 km and 405,000 km.

This means that its size in the night sky also varies over the course of each month, by around 13%. It brightness also varies slightly – the Moon appears a little brighter when it is closer to the Earth. In practice, however, this variability is swamped by the much stronger effect that the Moon's changing phases have over its brightness.

The Moon's distance varies between perigee (closest approach), apogee (furthest recess) and back again once every 27.555 days – a period of time called ananomalistic month. This is very close to the Moon's orbital period (27.322 days), but slightly longer. For more information on why these periods don't exacty match, see In-The-Sky.org's glossary article for the term month.

This perigee will coincide closely with the time of month when the Moon is at full phase, a phenomenon that is sometimes called a "supermoons". The full moon this month will appear fractionally larger and brighter than usual, but so too will the full moons that fall immediately before and after a supermoon, when the Moon will also be close to perigee.

On this occasion the Moon will pass within a distance of 356,000 km of the Earth, and appear with an angular diameter of 33.47 arcmin. This may be compared to its average size of 31.07 arcmin.

The genuine variation in the Moon's angular size that is associated with its changing distance from the Earth should not be confused with the Moon illusion – an optical illustion that makes the Moon appear much larger than it really is when it is close to the horizon. The reason why we experience this optical illusion is still hotly debated.

The position of the Moon at the moment of perigee will be:

Object
Right Ascension
Declination
Constellation
Angular Size
The Moon
00h14m10s
+01°14'
Pisces
33'27"

The coordinates above are given in J2000.0.

I use an angular diameter of approx ~33.3 as my general rule of thumb when I view the moon A perigee.
That is what I'll teach my Grandkid. LilD    P3RIG33 = PERIGEE



Thanx for the lava domes article.

You could hide a lot of critters inside one of those tubes.  Alien2
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#16
This image here with what may be boulders... that may also be domes all in a row?

That caught my eye,especially with the little crater at the end of the row for visual cueing.

[Image: AS15-P-0347_0006a2.png]

Not every crater may be a crater and every bumpy lump might also be a dome.

If in situ resource utilisation is considered: 
Any scanning technologies would find it made of natural local materials(Just Rocks) Pennywise


If we see things in a row it doesn't mean artificial but it also doesn't mean we can massage the data and cherry-pick either.

with that caveat I transpose the possibilities to earth based design theory because we don't know what other civilisations would use.

We can't assume any large roundish object is Just a boulder or lava dome etc...

Although the article below is about mars' future the idea has past lunar applications as well in theory.
-----

3D-printed bubble house could pop up on Mars soon

by Katie Medlock, 09/14/15 





[Image: Capture-d’écran-2015-08-31-à-16.02.44.png]
Read more: This 3D-printed Sfero bubble house would be constructed with Martian soil | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building 

http://inhabitat.com/3d-printed-bubble-h...nterior-2/
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#17
...
If the sun was directly over head in those images,
the little bumpies and spikes would have no shadows and probably be imperceptible.
They are probably crater ejecta that tumbled across hard surface with little dust cover to leave a trail of tumble.

On the 3d iron oxide-water printed bubble dome luxury condo.
I suppose that other metals from other deposits may be used,
once the "iron oxides" resources are developed into bubble colonies that are sustainable.

The bubble design has no windows? Damned

Negative thinking here, but then the technologies are ... optomistic.
http://inhabitat.com/mit-study-shows-mar...stainable/
...
Reply
#18
I like the idea of the bubble house on Mars, but how do you take all the equipment needed there, the 3D printer etc etc?
Seek and ye shall find. JESUS
------------------------------------------
I am a recovering vegetarian   Hi
Reply
#19
The "domes" would be on a slope, my guess is approximately 40°.
Reply
#20
...
very doubtful that they would be on a 40 degree slope, unless embedded within the slope deeply and at 0 degrees angle.
The in situ materials are generally extracted from a flat horizontal surface.

With no windows Whip
how about excavated bedrock into caves with the bubble wrap design enclosures within,
and the entrance a separate compartmental feature.
However that would happen well after colonization has established itself in bubble domes
and supply missions are routine.
Still need a space defense system for incoming meteors?
 
Mayito

Quote:I like the idea of the bubble house on Mars, 
but how do you take all the equipment needed there, the 3D printer etc etc?

It has to be transported there <---
that observation of yours is mentioned in the link I supplied, and by the people making the product.
...
Reply
#21
Other question I have with that house, how do you produce the Oxygen you need for life, plants can only produce su much unless you build a lot of green houses for the plants, how you process the waste, what about water, shower etc
Seek and ye shall find. JESUS
------------------------------------------
I am a recovering vegetarian   Hi
Reply
#22
...
Mayito, it's kind of a  one shit - no shave - no shower  lifestyle of limited water during the colonization process,
but water is certainly available.
The waste and sewer system becomes a good question when looking at a settlement of 20-50 domes.
A breakdown of plumbing within a dome pod could lead to overflowing toilets Lol

Self assembly robotics may come into play before human pilgrims land on Mars
...
Reply
#23
Quote:Then as the full moon approaches, it eases up just a little. When the phase passes, things go back to normal fairly quickly. I often wonder if I recognize a pattern or am I just strangely superstitious. [Image: hmm2.gif]


Cyclic West Coast Represent!!! Dance016 
http://griffithobservatory.org/events/Lu..._2015.html
Everyone @ JPL can have their Tetrad Time Ritual at the same time. LilD

[Image: 21574767339_430c110b0a_o.jpg]
Vianova should see Maximum Eclipse @ ~19:47 tonight too! :Hi improv eyes.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#24
well welll well.

Interesting indeed.
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
Reply
#25
(09-27-2015, 03:40 PM)Keith Wrote: well welll well.

Interesting indeed.

At the moment when the Moon reaches full phase, it will lie at a declination of +01°27' in the constellation Pisces, and so will appear high in the sky at all but the most extreme latitudes. It will be visible at all latitudes between 81°N and 78°S. Its distance from the Earth will be 356,000 km.
The exact position of the Moon at the time it reaches full phase will be:
ObjectThe Moon
Right Ascension00h16m50s
Declination+01°27'
ConstellationPisces
Angular Size33'27"

The coordinates above are given in J2000.0.

The details of this observing event were provided courtesy of In-The-Sky.org

The Rule of Thumb I'll teach my grandson is:  Moon @PERIGEE = ~P3RIG33
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#26
...
It's also called a blood moon this time, I missed it. 
I was on the road for 2 days, forgot the timing.

link with blood moon images

http://www.theguardian.com/science/galle...-the-world

[Image: 4884.jpg?w=700&q=85&auto=format&sharp=10...4724eb169d]
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)