Thread Rating:
  • 3 Vote(s) - 3.67 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Concept Assessment of a Fission Fragment Rocket Engine - NASA
#34
...
great posts!

Applause

I was surprised to see that it was a Tokamak reactor that accomplished the new Korean fusion record.

also this is quite interesting:

Quote:Groups around the world 
are looking to push the energy producing capacity of the technology even further, 
with the ITER reactor currently under construction in France.

It will be the largest Tokamak-style reactor ever built,
and will be 800 times Damned the volume of MIT’s reactor.


Engineers on the project hope to achieve 2.6 atmospheres of pressure when the reactor is fully operational, 
and generate temperatures of 150 million degrees Celsius (270 million degrees Farenheit).

The goal for future reactions is to carry out sustained fusion reactions for up to 10 minutes, 

laying the groundwork for a fully functioning reactor.


It's highly expensive technology in Tokamaks,
but in the end game,
they will manufacture fusion reactors the size of a waste paper basket.
...
Reply
#35
(12-17-2016, 10:18 AM)EA Wrote: Toward safer, long-life nuclear reactors—metal design could raise radiation resistance by 100 times
December 16, 2016 by Katherine Mcalpine

[Image: towardsaferl.jpg]
An electron microscope reveals the radiation-induced cavities inside samples of pure nickel and alloys. The cavities in nickel-cobalt-iron and nickel-cobalt-iron-chromium-manganese alloys are 100 times smaller than those in pure nickel. Credit: Wang Group, University of Michigan
In findings that could change the way industries like nuclear energy and aerospace look for materials that can stand up to radiation exposure, University of Michigan researchers have discovered that metal alloys with three or more elements in equal concentrations can be remarkably resistant to radiation-induced swelling.


The big problem faced by metals bombarded with radiation at high temperatures—such as the metals that make up nuclear fuel cladding—is that they have a tendency to swell up significantly. They can even double in size.
"First, it may interfere with other parts in the structure, but also when it swells, the strength of the material changes. The material density drops," said Lumin Wang, U-M professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences. "It may become soft at high temperatures or harden at low temperatures."
This happens because when a particle flies into the metal and knocks an atom out of the crystal structure, that displaced atom can travel quickly through the metallic crystal. Meanwhile, the empty space left behind doesn't move very fast. If many atoms are ousted from the same area, those empty spaces can coalesce into sizable cavities.
To control the formation of these cavities, and the attendant swelling, most recent research has focused on creating micro- and nano-structures inside the metal as specially designed "sinks" to absorb small defects in a way that preserves the integrity of the material. But Wang and his colleagues are kicking it old school, looking at alloys that don't have breaks in the crystal structure of the atoms.
[Image: 1-towardsaferl.jpg]
An electron microscope reveals the radiation-induced cavities inside a sample of pure nickel. The cavities in nickel-cobalt-iron and nickel-cobalt-iron-chromium-manganese alloys are 100 times smaller. Credit: Wang Group, University of Michigan
Colleagues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee created samples of a variety of nickel-based alloys. These were then exposed to radiation in a facility at the University of Tennessee. The most successful alloys were concentrated solid solutions—crystals made of equal parts nickel, cobalt and iron; or nickel, cobalt, iron, chromium and manganese.
"These materials have many good properties such as strength and ductility, and now we can add radiation tolerance," said Chenyang Lu, a U-M postdoctoral research fellow in nuclear engineering and radiological sciences and the leading author of the report in Nature Communications.


In an experiment proposed by Wang, UT researchers exposed the samples to beams of radiation that created two levels of damage, similar to what may accumulate in a reactor core over several years and over several decades. These experiments were done at a temperature of 500 Celsius or 932 Fahrenheit—a temperature at which nickel-based alloys are usually prone to swelling.
These samples were analyzed at U-M's Center for Material Characterization with a transmission electron microscope. The team found that compared to pure nickel, the best alloys had more than 100 times less radiation damage.
To explain what was special about these alloys, the team worked closely with the group of Fei Gao, a theoretician and U-M professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences. Gao's group performed computer simulations at the level of individual atoms and showed that the radiation tolerance in this group of alloys can be attributed to the way that the displaced atoms travel within the material. The explanation was further confirmed by another set of experiments conducted by the team at the University of Wisconsin.
[Image: 2-towardsaferl.jpg]
An electron microscope reveals the radiation-induced cavities inside a sample of nickel-cobalt-iron-chromium-manganese alloy. The cavities in pure nickel are 100 times larger. Credit: Wang Group, University of Michigan
"In simplified terms, if there are a lot of atoms of different sizes, you can consider them bumps or potholes," Wang said. "So this defect won't travel so smoothly. It will bounce around and slow down."
Because the displaced atoms and the holes in the crystal structure stayed near one another, they were much more likely to find one another. In effect, this repaired many of the vacancies in the complicated alloys before they could join together into larger cavities.
"Based on this study, we now understand how to develop a radiation-tolerant matrix of an alloy," Wang said.
The study, titled "Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single phase alloys," appears in Nature Communications.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Physicists create a high-strength material for the aerospace and engineering industries
More information: Chenyang Lu et al. Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single-phase alloys, Nature Communications (2016). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms13564 
Journal reference: Nature Communications [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: University of Michigan



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-12-safer-long-...e.html#jCp
Tantalum carbide (TaC) and hafnium carbide (HfC) are refractory ceramics, meaning they are extraordinarily resistant to heat. Their ability to withstand extremely harsh environments means that refractory ceramics could be used in thermal protection systems on high-speed vehicles and as fuel cladding in the super-heated environments of nuclear reactors.
New record set for world's most heat resistant material
December 22, 2016 by Caroline Brogan

[Image: 585bb53dce44b.jpg]
Discovery paves the way for new types of heat shields. Credit: NASA
Researchers have discovered that tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide materials can withstand scorching temperatures of nearly 4000 degrees Celsius.


In particular, the team from Imperial College London discovered that the melting point of hafnium carbide is the highest ever recorded for a material. Being able to withstand temperatures of nearly 4000°C could pave the way for both materials to be used in ever more extreme environments, such as in heat resistant shielding for the next generation of hypersonic space vehicles.
Tantalum carbide (TaC) and hafnium carbide (HfC) are refractory ceramics, meaning they are extraordinarily resistant to heat. Their ability to withstand extremely harsh environments means that refractory ceramics could be used in thermal protection systems on high-speed vehicles and as fuel cladding in the super-heated environments of nuclear reactors. However, there hasn't been the technology available to test the melting point of TaC and HfC in the lab to determine how truly extreme an environment they could function in.
The researchers of the study, which is published in the journal Scientific Reports, developed a new extreme heating technique using lasers to test the heat tolerance of TaC and HfC. They used the laser-heating techniques to find the point at which TaC and HfC melted, both separately and as mixed compositions of both.
They found that the mixed compound (Ta0.8Hf0.20C) was consistent with previous research, melting at 3905°C, but the two compounds on their own exceeded previous recorded melting points. The compound TaC melted at 3768°C and HfC melted at 3958°C.
Space race
The researchers say the new findings could pave the way for the next generation of hypersonic vehicles, meaning spacecraft could become faster than ever.
Dr Omar Cedillos-Barraza, who is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Texas - El Paso, carried out the study while doing his PhD at Imperial's Department of Materials.
Dr Cedillos-Barraza said: "The friction involved when travelling above Mach 5 – hypersonic speeds – creates very high temperatures. So far, TaC and HfC have not been potential candidates for hypersonic aircraft, but our new findings show that they can withstand even more heat than we previously thought - more than any other compound known to man. This means that they could be useful materials for new types of spacecraft that can fly through the atmosphere like a plane, before reaching hypersonic speeds to shoot out into space. These materials may enable spacecraft to withstand the extreme heat generated from leaving and re-entering the atmosphere."
Examples of potential uses for TaC and HfC could be used in nose caps for spacecraft, and as the edges of external instruments that have to withstand the most friction during flight.
Currently, vehicles going over Mach 5 speeds do not carry people, but Dr Cedillos-Barraza suggests it may be possible in the future.
Dr Cedillos-Barraza added: "Our tests demonstrate that these materials show real promise in the engineering of space vehicles of the future. Being able to withstand such extreme temperatures means that missions involving hypersonic spacecraft may one day be manned missions. For example, a flight from London to Sydney may take about 50 minutes at Mach 5, which could open a new world of commercial opportunities for countries around the world."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Scientists create a ceramic resistant to extreme temperatures
More information: Omar Cedillos-Barraza et al. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep37962 
Journal reference: Scientific Reports [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: Imperial College London



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-12-world-resistant-material.html#jCp[url=http://phys.org/news/2016-12-world-resistant-material.html#jCp][/url]

All they need now is a magnetosphere and a self propigating anti-matter bow-shock/deflector sheild to ward the other dangers.  Doh
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#36
New path suggested for nuclear fusion
March 2, 2017

[Image: newpathsugge.jpg]
Using shaped laser pulses -- ultrashort, tuned bursts of coherent light -- might make it possible to nudge atoms in a deuterium/tritium molecule close enough to fuse, according to a new study. Researchers at Rice University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chile suggested that quantum-controlled fusion may provide a possible new path toward the production of energy through nuclear fusion. Credit: Gruebele Group/University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Controlled nuclear fusion has been a holy grail for physicists who seek an endless supply of clean energy. Scientists at Rice University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chile offered a glimpse into a possible new path toward that goal.



Their report on quantum-controlled fusion puts forth the notion that rather than heating atoms to temperatures found inside the sun or smashing them in a collider, it might be possible to nudge them close enough to fuse by using shaped laser pulses: ultrashort, tuned bursts of coherent light.


Authors Peter Wolynes of Rice, Martin Gruebele of Illinois and Illinois alumnus Eduardo Berrios of Chile simulated reactions in two dimensions that, if extrapolated to three, might just produce energy efficiently from deuterium and tritium or other elements.
Their paper appears in the festschrift edition of Chemical Physical Letters dedicated to Ahmed Zewail, Gruebele's postdoctoral adviser and a Nobel laureate for his work on femtochemistry, in which femtosecond-long laser flashes trigger chemical reactions.
The femtochemical technique is central to the new idea that nuclei can be pushed close enough to overcome the Coulomb barrier that forces atoms of like charge to repel each other. When that is accomplished, atoms can fuse and release heat through neutron scattering. When more energy is created than it takes to sustain the reaction, sustained fusion becomes viable.
The trick is to do all this in a controlled way, and scientists have been pursuing such a trick for decades, primarily by containing hydrogen plasmas at sun-like temperatures (at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Ignition Facility and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor effort in France) and in large facilities.
The new paper describes a basic proof-of-principle simulation that shows how, in two dimensions, a shaped-laser pulse would push a molecule of deuterium and tritium, its nuclei already poised at a much smaller internuclear distance than in a plasma, nearly close enough to fuse. "What prevents them from coming together is the positive charge of the nuclei, and both of these nuclei have the smallest charge, 1," Wolynes said.
He said 2-D simulations were necessary to keep the iterative computations practical, even though doing so required stripping electrons from the model molecules. "The best way to do it would be to leave the electrons on to help the process and control their motions, but that is a higher-dimensional problem that we—or someone—will tackle in the future," Wolynes said.


Without the electrons, it was still possible to bring nuclei within a small fraction of an angstrom by simulating the effects of shaped 5-femtosecond, near-infrared laser pulses, which held the nuclei together in a "field-bound" molecule.
"For decades, researchers have also investigated muon-catalyzed fusion, where the electron in the deuterium/tritium molecule is replaced by a muon," Gruebele said. "Think of it as a 208-times heavier electron. As a result, the molecular bond distance shrinks by a factor of 200, poising the nuclei even better for fusion.
"Sadly, muons don't live forever, and the increased fusion efficiency just falls short of breaking even in energy output," he said. "But when shaped vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses become as available as the near-infrared ones we simulated here, quantum control of muonic fusion may get it over the threshold."
Because the model works at the quantum level—where subatomic particles are subject to different rules and have the characteristics of both particles and waves—the Heisenberg uncertainty principle comes into play. That makes it impossible to know the precise location of particles and makes tuning the lasers a challenge, Wolynes said.
"It's clear the kind of pulses you need have to be highly sculpted and have many frequencies in them," he said. "It will probably take experimentation to figure out what the best pulse shape should be, but tritium is radioactive, so no one ever wants to put tritium in their apparatus until they're sure it's going to work."
Wolynes said he and Gruebele, whose lab studies protein folding, cell dynamics, nanostructure microscopy, fish swimming behavior and other topics, have been thinking about the possibilities for about a decade, even though nuclear fusion is more of a hobby than a profession for both. "We finally got the courage to say, 'Well, it's worth saying something about it.'
"We're not starting a company ... yet," he said. "But there may be angles here other people can think through that would lead to something practical even in the short term, such as production of short alpha particle pulses that could be useful in research applications.
"I'd be lying if I said that when we started the calculation, I didn't hope it might just solve mankind's energy problems," Wolynes said. "At this point, it doesn't. On the other hand, I think it's an interesting question that starts us on a new path."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Diagnostics for super-hot plasmas in fusion reactors
More information: Eduardo Berrios et al, Quantum controlled fusion, Chemical Physics Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.cplett.2017.02.045 
Provided by: Rice University


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-path-nucle...n.html#jCp[/url]


Quote:"For decades, researchers have also investigated muon-catalyzed fusion, where the electron in the deuterium/tritium molecule is replaced by a muon," Gruebele said. "Think of it as a 208-times heavier electron. As a result, the molecular bond distance shrinks by a factor of 200, poising the nuclei even better for fusion.

"Sadly, muons don't live forever, and the increased fusion efficiency just falls short of breaking even in energy output," he said. "But when shaped vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses become as available as the near-infrared ones we simulated here, quantum control of muonic fusion may get it over the threshold."

Because the model works at the quantum level—where subatomic particles are subject to different rules and have the characteristics of both particles and waves—the Heisenberg uncertainty principle comes into play. That makes it impossible to know the precise location of particles and makes tuning the lasers a challenge, Wolynes said.

"It's clear the kind of pulses you need have to be highly sculpted and have many frequencies in them," he said. "It will probably take experimentation to figure out what the best pulse shape should be, but tritium is radioactive, so no one ever wants to put tritium in their apparatus until they're sure it's going to work."

Electrically tunable metasurfaces pave the way toward dynamic holograms

March 2, 2017 by Lisa Zyga feature

[Image: electrically.jpg]
A new metasurface composed of silicon nanodisks integrated into a liquid crystal can be electrically tuned by turning a voltage “on” and “off.” The change in voltage changes the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules, which in turn changes the optical transmission of the metasurface. Credit: Komar et al. Published by AIP Publishing
(Phys.org)—Dynamic holograms allow three-dimensional images to change over time like a movie, but so far these holograms are still being developed. The development of dynamic holograms may now get a boost from recent research on optical metasurfaces, a type of photonic surface with tunable optical properties.



In a new study published in Applied Physics Letters, a team of scientists at The Australian National University in Canberra, Australia; Friedrich Schiller University Jena in Jena, Germany; and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, US, has demonstrated a new way to tune optical metasurfaces.
A metasurface is a thin sheet consisting of a periodic array of nanoscale elements. The exact dimensions of these elements is critical, since they are specifically designed to manipulate certain wavelengths of light in particular ways that enhance their electric and magnetic properties.
Here, the scientists demonstrated how to manipulate a metasurface by applying an electrical voltage. By switching the control voltage "on" and "off," the researchers could change the optical transmission of the metasurface. For instance, they could tune the transmission from opaque to the transparent regime for certain wavelengths, achieving a transmittance change of up to 75%. The voltage switch could also change the phase of certain wavelengths by up to 180°.
"We demonstrate a new technology platform that enables tuning of optical metasurfaces with large contrast by simple application of a voltage," Dragomir Neshev, a physics professor at The Australian National University, told Phys.org. "From an application perspective, it adds to the significance that our tuning concept is based on a similar technology as used in commercial liquid crystal displays, which would largely facilitate the translation of our concept to real-world applications of tunable metasurfaces."
The way this tuning works is that the voltage physically changes the elements of the metasurface. The metasurface is made of a square lattice of 600-nm-diameter silicon nanodisks embedded into a liquid crystal. When the voltage is "off," the elongated molecules of the liquid crystal lie parallel to the metasurface. Turning the voltage "on" reorients the liquid crystal molecules so that they stand up perpendicular to the metasurface. Light waves interact with the metasurface differently depending on the orientation of the liquid crystal.
While other methods of metasurface tuning have been suggested, these have various drawbacks, such as that they work slowly and require assistance that makes them impractical for immediate applications. Since the new electrically tunable metasurface works quickly and simply, the researchers expect that the method could have a wide variety of applications, including dynamic holograms, tunable imaging, and active beam steering.
"Regarding a long-term vision or inspiration for the development of dynamic holographic devices, we can watch almost any science fiction movie," Neshev said. "Most of them feature holographic man-machine interaction devices for visualization and communication purposes, where the hologram moves and changes in time based on user input.
"While we are still far from this goal, a realistic medium-term application of our metasurfaces are tunable lenses for laser microscopy applications and beam shapers with enhanced functionalities, such as polarization selective response. Active beam steering or beam shaping could be applied in communications or as components in optical laboratory setups."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: High-efficiency color holograms created using a metasurface made of nanoblocks
More information: Andrei Komar et al. "Electrically tunable all-dielectric optical metasurfaces based on liquid crystals." Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4976504
ABSTRACT 
We demonstrate electrical tuning of the spectral response of a Mie-resonant dielectric metasurface consisting of silicon nanodisks embedded into liquid crystals. We use the reorientation of nematic liquid crystals in a moderate applied electric field to alter the anisotropic permittivity tensor around the metasurface. By switching a control voltage "on" and "off," we induce a large spectral shift of the metasurface resonances, resulting in an absolute transmission modulation of up to 75%. Our experimental demonstration of voltage control of dielectric metasurfaces paves the way for new types of electrically tunable metadevices, including dynamic displays and holograms. 

Journal reference: Applied Physics Letters


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-electrically-tunable-metasurfaces-pave-dynamic.html#jCp[url=https://phys.org/news/2017-03-electrically-tunable-metasurfaces-pave-dynamic.html#jCp]



Diagnostics for super-hot plasmas in fusion reactors

January 30, 2017



[Image: diagnosticsf.jpg]
It’s tough to measure the concentration of the single or neutral hydrogen atoms in fusion plasmas. The temperatures reach tens of thousands of degrees or more. A new calibration technique to improve these measurements uses different fluorescence pathways in a laser-induced fluorescence measurement system. Xenon (blue) and krypton (red) fluorescence have different optical pathways in the measurement system. The krypton fluorescence does not make it through the pinhole. Xenon does. Using xenon as the calibration gas provides a fluorescence signal that is more similar to hydrogen, improving the calibration of the system for hydrogen density measurements. Credit: US Department of Energy
In the sun and other fusion plasmas, atoms of hydrogen and its isotopes are the fuel. Plasmas are gases that are so hot that electrons are knocked free of the atom, making the atoms electrically charged ions. The un-ionized atoms are called neutrals. On earth, accurately measuring neutral hydrogen concentration in plasmas could offer insights into future fusion experiments and impact the design of a future fusion-based energy source. To measure the hydrogen density, scientists need to use a calibrated measurement method. They used krypton gas, which absorbs two chunks of light energy at the same time (photons) and in turn emits another photon. The problem is the light emitted is not at the right wavelength for accurate hydrogen density measurements. In this study, scientists discovered that xenon atoms emit light at a wavelength that calibrates well with hydrogen and improves the measurements of neutral hydrogen density.




https://phys.org/news/2017-01-diagnostic...ctors.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#37
Bump.  Hi Hi there RW
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#38
(04-26-2017, 06:11 PM)EA Wrote: Bump.  Hi Hi there RW

If that's me thanks Hi

Why isn't the energy sector using this NEW data type to build cleaner energy Hmm2


Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Morning Light, No sensation to compare to this, suspended animation, state of bliss, I keep my eyes on the circling sky, tongue tied and twisted just and Earth Bound Martian I" Learning to Fly Pink Floyd [Video: https://vimeo.com/144891474]
Reply
#39
EmDrive: The Rocket Technology That Uses Electrical Power to Create Thrust

[Image: 1OU6KldyXIIz_thumb.jpg]
By  Kathleen Villaluz
August, 13th 2017



[Image: emdrive-salvation-2_resize_xs.jpg]
Electric cars are so 2015 and even the concept of electric aircraft seems like old news already. But how about electric rockets? Yes, a rocket that doesn't use high oxygen propellant fuel for propulsion but instead, uses electrical energy to enable upward launch. This rocket technology, known as EmDrive, has been invented by electrical engineer Roger Shawyer back in 1999. Since then, Shawyer has developed three generations of the electric rocket launch technology. In his recent, third generation development of the electric rocket concept, Shawyer detailed out how his technology could be used for both space flights and as a personal air vehicle. Last year, Shawyer confirmed that both the British Ministry of Defense and the US Department of Defense are interested in his controversial rocket propulsion technology.

EmDrive was recently depicted in the fictional TV show "Salvation" on CBS. [Image Source: CBS]

[Image: salvation-emdrive.jpg]

[Image Source: CBS]

How does the EmDrive rocket propulsion system work?

So, what is the actual physics behind the EmDrive technology? Is it really possible for this type of system to enable rocket launch? EmDrive's technology is based on the well-known physical phenomenon called radiation pressure. It follows Newton's Second Law of Motion (F=ma) where "force is defined as the rate of change of momentum". Basically, the engine achieves propulsion by firing electromagnetic (EM) waves with a large velocity difference inside a tapered waveguide. A difference in force is achieved once the two EM waves bounce off their respective reflector, which gives off a resultant thrust to the whole system. According to the Satellite Propulsion Research website, the laws of physics used in this concept engine has been thoroughly reviewed and were found to not violate nor transgress and scientific principles.

[Image: EmDrive-engine.jpg]

[Image Source: EmDrive]

Shawyer thinks that the EmDrive engine could potentially be used in reusable rocket launch vessels as it doesn't speed up too fast during re-entry on Earth meaning the whole system wouldn't be prone to burning.

"The EmDrive thruster accelerates to take it into orbit and decelerates to bring it back down, but it doesn't go very fast through the atmosphere, because all the time the mass of the launch vehicle is supported by the thruster, except when it finally achieves orbital velocity. This was once described by a US Air Force guy as a 'space elevator without cables', which I think is quite apt".

This unprecedented technology sets it apart from all of the other rocket launch vessels currently available as gravity is always resisted upon the re-entry stage.

"The thruster is always supporting the mass of the vehicle, you decelerate from orbital velocity and almost all of the orbital velocity is lost before you enter the atmosphere", said Shawyer. "This is completely unlike any other flight profile. You counteract the pull of gravity all the time with the EmDrive thrusters".

Shawyer has also detailed out from his recently published presentation how the EmDrive engine can be used for personal flight on Earth, that is. The engineer spoke about an EmDrive system with eight 3G thrusters that offer silent, reliable, and solid-state propulsion without any moving parts. The personal air vehicle uses a "green" renewable liquid hydrogen (LH2) as fuel, which only produces water vapor as exhaust. Shawyer expressed that this new, third generation EmDrive technology could also be used for space flight as well as a personal air vehicle.

"Once you use EmDrive in this way, you can use it for any aerospace application, whether it's in space or in the air. So this is what this presentation is, it is essentially the same thrust package that will put you into orbit or take you out for the day".








Sources: IBTimesUKSatellite Propulsion Research Ltd
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#40
...

Quote:The engineer spoke about an EmDrive system with eight 3G thrusters that offer silent, reliable, 
and solid-state propulsion without any moving parts. 


Promotional public relations full of optimism for media and investor potential.



Quote:The personal air vehicle uses a "green" renewable liquid hydrogen (LH2) as fuel, 
which only produces water vapor as exhaust. 

for hydrogen to be in a fully liquid state without boiling at atmospheric pressure, 
it needs to be cooled to −423.17 °F    or   −252.87 °C)

LH2 refrigeration units for the personal air vehicle,
are likely to be bulky, heavy, and expensive.
...
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)