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Sum Thingz in the air... drones now official.
#1
Donuts in flight in first US-approved drone delivery
July 23, 2016

[Image: donutsachick.jpg]
Donuts, a chicken sandwich, and hot coffee were among the items in the first drone delivery on US soil approved by aviation officials, made by convenience retailer 7-Eleven and the drone startup Flirtey
With a chicken sandwich, hot coffee and donuts, aviation history was made Friday.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-07-donuts-flig...y.html#jCp

Holycowsmile
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#2
Now you got me thinking about drone painting.

Tangentially, I once saw a video of an ex-astronaut
who had experimented giving paper wasps bits of colored paper to chew.
The wasps constructed big nests with intricate patterns...not at all random.
I don't have an image unfortunately. Not much the last time I looked...

http://www.booooooom.com/2016/04/04/matt...bow-nests/

http://www.mattiamenchetti.com/

[Image: Menchetti8.jpg]
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#3
thats wild!

what scares me is the future 'first' unibomber.

[Image: donutsachick.jpg]





[Image: Unabomber-sketch.png]

nah...... 

never happen?    Cry

Fears ISIS could use drones packed with explosives to attack crowds at major events such as football matches or music festivals 
  • Counter-terrorism chiefs worried ISIS will use drones to attack crowds

  • Believe they will target open-air events like festivals or football matches

  • Concerned they will pack remotely-controlled devices with explosives 

  • ISIS terrorists are 'obsessed with re-creating the horror of 9/11 attacks'
By KEILIGH BAKER FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 04:46 GMT, 24 July 2015 UPDATED: 14:55 GMT, 24 July 2015



Defence chiefs are concerned Islamic State could use drones packed with explosives to attack crowds at major events like football matches and music festivals in order to kill scores of people.
Senior MI5 figures and the police believe ISIS will use unmanned devices like drones - which are freely available to buy on the high street for as little as £100 - to target crowds at popular outdoor events, a source has revealed.
They are concerned the terrorists could even launch an attack using several drones, some packed with bombs, while others film the bloody events unfold for use in future propaganda videos. 
Scroll down for video 
[Image: 2609027500000578-3172979-image-a-9_1437712528662.jpg]
Senior MI5 figures and the police believe ISIS will use unmanned devices like drones - which are freely available to buy on the high street for as little as £100 - to target crowds at popular outdoor events
The security chiefs think ISIS may have already tested exactly how much explosives the machines can carry, even getting as far as experimenting with detonation devices.
A counter-terrorism source told the Express: 'Islamist plotters have been trying to launch a drone-borne bomb attack for some time, as these machines are getting more hi-tech every year. 

'Isis is obsessed with re-creating the horror of 9/11 and believes this may be possible by launching a multi-drone attack on large numbers of people in a synchronised attack.'

Remote-controlled drones, which are becoming an increasingly popular presents for children, are available for as little as £100.
Last Christmas stores in the UK reported a 24 per cent increase in sales of drones.

[Image: 2AC70CFE00000578-3172979-image-a-10_1437712532229.jpg]
The counter-terror chiefs even think ISIS (militants pictured) may have already tested exactly how much explosives the machines can carry, getting as far as experimenting with detonation devices

The Express reports that security chiefs believe ISIS could target crowds at open-air music festivals or high-profile football matches for maximum effect.
Colonel Richard Kemp, who has advised the Government on terrorism, told the Mirror: 'There is a genuine threat from Islamists wishing to deliver high explosives by drone to crowded areas - the effects could be devastating.'
Security bosses are concerned the terrorists may even attempt to build their own drones so as to avoid suspicion - or even attempt to but military-grade machines from the black marjet, which would be powerful enough to kill dozens of people. 
Earlier this week MailOnline reported planes flying in and out of British airports have narrowly missed catastrophic collisions with drones on six occasions in the last 12 months alone.
Two Airbus A320 jets capable of carrying 150 passengers came within less than 50 feet of the hobby aircraft - one of which whizzed passed by just 20 feet - when coming into land at the country's busiest airport, Heathrow. 
Drones have been put to other dangerous uses, too. 
In October last year a European Championship football match between Serbia and Albania descended into a riot after a drone was deliberately flown inside the stadium in Belgrade trailing an Albanian flag, much to the fury of the Serbs.
[Image: 0DB071DC00000578-3172979-image-a-11_1437712843625.jpg]


ISIS terrorists are 'obsessed with re-creating the horror of 9/11' and want to stage a similar attack with drones
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3172979/Fears-ISIS-use-drones-packed-explosives-attack-crowds.html#ixzz4FfQMpBta 
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#4
Somewhere here maybe 6 or 8 years ago at least, I laid out the scenario about how terrorists could spring just such attacks as is being discussed now, but back then I was thinking about RC airplanes as the tool best suited for that purpose, and I'm not sure they wouldn't carry a heavier payload even now.
However, these new drones would probably be easier to fly, and they are becoming more powerful every day!

Better start stationing accomplished Sporting Clay Bird shooters around the rooflines of buildings and general outside events to bring the little machines down. Lead shot (BBBs or larger) could do the trick out to a hundred yards.
Extended magazine auto loaders for sure. Cheap, and effective.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
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#5
(07-28-2016, 08:37 PM)Fsbirdhouse Wrote: Somewhere here maybe 6 or 8 years ago at least, I laid out the scenario about how terrorists could spring just such attacks as is being discussed now, but back then I was thinking about RC airplanes as the tool best suited for that purpose, and I'm not sure they wouldn't carry a heavier payload even now.
However, these new drones would probably be easier to fly, and they are becoming more powerful every day!

Better start stationing accomplished Sporting Clay Bird shooters around the rooflines of buildings and general outside events to bring the little machines down. Lead shot (BBBs or larger) could do the trick out to a hundred yards.
Extended magazine auto loaders for sure. Cheap, and effective.
I've seen some video of indoor drone gaming arenas.
I suppose they could outfit them with diode lasers and sensors to score hits.

Eventually, homeowners will have to base defense drones in rooftop cupolas
in addition to mousetraps and shotguns...
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#6
Goose Gun
lol .
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
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#7
Update only five years ago.
http://thehiddenmission.com/forum/showth...te+control
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#8
Facebook's Internet-Delivery Drone Completes First Test Flight

By Kacey Deamer, Staff Writer | July 27, 2016 01:46pm ET

Facebook recently completed its first test flight of a solar-powered drone that is designed to beam down internet access to remote areas of the world.

The Aquila drone is being developed to broaden the scope of internet connectivity around the globe. "New technologies like Aquila have the potential to bring access, voice and opportunity to billions of people around the world, and do so faster and more cost-effectively than has ever been possible before," Jay Parikh, global head of engineering and infrastructure at Facebook, wrote in a blog post about the project.

When testing is finished, the autonomous aircraft will be able to circle a region measuring up to 60 miles (96.6 kilometers) in diameter, while using laser communications and millimeter wave systems (extremely high-frequency radio waves) to send connectivity down from an altitude of more than 60,000 feet (18,288 meters). [5 Surprising Ways Drones Could Be Used in the Future]



The huge unmanned airplane has a wingspan larger than a Boeing 737 airliner, but weighs hundreds of times less (about one-third of an electric car), according to Facebook, because of its carbon-fiber frame. In fact, half of Aquila's mass is made up of batteries, which enable the solar-powered plane to fly during the day and night.

"Aquila is designed to be hyper efficient, so it can fly for up to three months at a time," Parikh wrote. "The aircraft has the wingspan of an airliner, but at cruising speed it will consume only 5,000 watts — the same amount as three hair dryers, or a high-end microwave."

The recent test flight was the first for the full-scale drone, as previous tests used a one-fifth scale version of Aquila, according to the social media giant. Facebook said it plans to push Aquila to the limits in a lengthy series of tests over the coming months and years.

[Image: facebook-internet-graphic.jpg?1469640098...size=192:*]



The Aquila drone is designed to beam down internet access to remote areas of the world.

Credit: Facebook

During the low-altitude test flight, Aquila flew for more than 90 minutes, which was three times longer than Facebook had planned. The flight's success included performance verifications of thedrone's aerodynamics, batteries, control systems and crew training.

"In our next tests, we will fly Aquila faster, higher and longer, eventually taking it above 60,000 feet," Parikh wrote. "Each test will help us learn and move faster toward our goal."

There is still a long road ahead as the social media company continues to test its internet-delivery drone.

The current world record for solar-powered unmanned flight stands at two weeks, set by by defense technology company Qinetiq's Zephyr plane in 2010, according to the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI). To reach Aquila's goal of delivering internet connectivity for up to three months at a time, Facebook said it will require significant advancements in science and engineering.
"It will also require us to work closely with operators, governments and other partners to deploy these aircraft in the regions where they'll be most effective," Parikh said.

http://www.livescience.com/55562-faceboo...light.html



Drones Taking Flight for Inaugural 'Liberty Cup' Race This Weekend

By Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | July 29, 2016 05:20pm ET


A swarm of 100 drone pilots will race for glory this weekend at the first-ever Liberty Cup, a competition that will qualify the Northeast's best drone pilots for the U.S. National Drone Racing Championships.

As if pulled from a scene in a science-fiction movie, thedrone pilots will wear so-called First Person View goggles, allowing them to see the oncoming twists and turns of the racetrack while they operate the drones via remote control on the ground below. In fact, The race pulled many participants into the world of technology, as the student pilots had to research and build their own drones, race officials said.

"First Person View (FPV) drone racing is a natural extension of STEM [science, technology, engineering and math] education, requiring a confluence of knowledge in the areas of computers, engineering, problem-solving and fine motor skills," Paul Hoffman, president and CEO of Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, New Jersey, where the race is being held, said in a statement.  [5 Surprising Ways Drones Could Be Used in the Future]



The races are open to the public (with the price of admission to the science center), and people can try on FPV goggles to get a drone's-eye view of the racetrack and see the impressive New York City skyline from across the Hudson River. Attendees can also test their drone-flying abilities in the center's indoor "Dronesium," a net-covered area where people can practice drone maneuvers. In addition, people can talk with drone builders and pilots in the Racer's Pit.







The competition will take place on Saturday and Sunday (July 30 and 31). On Saturday, 100 pilots will compete in time trials, with 24 advancing to the preliminaries on Sunday. In this second round, 24 pilots will compete for eight spots. The remaining pilots will compete in mixed events for the top awards — three solo pilots and one freestyle pilot, who will advance to the U.S. Drone Nationals, which will be held the following week on New York City's Governors Island.

The first U.S. Drone Nationals was held in 2015, and since then drones have continued to grow in popularity. Live Science will cover the event on Sunday, talking with drone builders and pilots to get the inside scoop on how to construct and operate the best flying machine.
The Liberty Cup is a partnership between the science center and Yeah Drones, a company that uses drones for aerial cinematography. Visit theLiberty Science Center to learn more.

http://www.livescience.com/55599-drones-...y-cup.html
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#9



Alphabet joins drone tests as US considers new rules
August 3, 2016 by Rob Lever

[Image: theehangcomm.jpg]
The EHang commercial drones Series V.1 and Series V.2 (top C) are displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada in January 2016
Google parent Alphabet is joining tests for drone deliveries, US officials announced Tuesday, as the White House unveiled accelerated rulemaking for commercial unmanned aircraft operations.



The announcement at a White House event said the US tech giant would participate in safety research through Project Wing, which is part of the "moonshot" unit called X created last year when Google was reorganized under Alphabet.
Project Wing will work at one of the six research centers set up by the Federal Aviation Administration for drone tests and its data "will be shared with government partners to help regulators answer critical safety and human factor questions for (drone) cargo delivery operations," a White House statement said.
At the "White House Drone Day" event, officials announced steps toward expanding rules for drone operations, including for newsgathering and commercial flights over populated areas, after a first set of regulations unveiled in June.
"We hope to propose a rule on unmanned aircraft operations over people by the end of this year," FAA administrator Michael Huerta said.
A White House statement said the FAA "is working on the next regulatory steps for safely integrating (drones) in the airspace" for "beneficial uses of drones near crowds, such as aerial photography or videography for newsgathering; for certain types of infrastructure inspection; and other applications."
The FAA said it was launching an Unmanned Aircraft Safety Team "that will include a wide variety of stakeholders from the drone and aviation industries" to study the proposals and was establishing a Drone Advisory Committee that will be chaired by Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich.
"We need to incorporate unmanned aircraft and their users into our culture of safety and responsibility. But we need to do it in a way that doesn't stifle the enthusiasm for this growing industry," Huerta said.
"We've found that the best way to accomplish this is to partner with a wide range of government, aviation and technology stakeholders."
Onward, upward
Huerta said the government has registered more than 500,000 hobby drones in eight months, but sees a need for more rules for commercial operators.
A first set of rules unveiled in June, and taking effect August 29, allows unmanned aircraft weighing less than 55 pounds (25 kilograms) to fly in sparsely occupied areas, up to 400 feet (120 meters) high during the day.
Officials say drones offer the potential for vast economic benefits—estimated by the industry to generate more than $82 billion for the US economy and support some 100,000 new jobs by 2025.
"Unmanned aircraft are transforming industries—providing filmmakers with a fresh angle on the world, and giving first responders a new tool for search-and-rescue operations," Huerta said.
"They're improving the safety of our transportation infrastructure—inspecting miles of rail tracks and pipelines that crisscross our country. And they're tackling jobs that can be dangerous for people or other aircraft to do."
Announced at the event was the allocation of $35 million in research funding by the National Science Foundation over the next five years to study the beneficial applications of drones for disaster response, agricultural monitoring, the study of severe storms and other uses.
The first set of rules stop short of allowing some long-sought applications, including delivery of goods by retailers like Amazon in populated areas.
The Obama administration had been criticized for its perceived slowness in establishing drone regulations, while the technology evolved at a rapid clip.
As the world's largest online retailer, Amazon raised eyebrows in late 2013 with its plan to airlift small parcels to customers by drone in select markets, less than 30 minutes after an order is received.
It has gone to other countries to test its evolving technology, and last month announced plans for test deliveries in Britain.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Amazon wants air space for delivery drones


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-08-alphabet-drone.html#jCp[url=http://phys.org/news/2016-08-alphabet-drone.html#jCp][/url]



Restoring prairie and fighting wildfire with (drone launched) fire(balls)

To restore the grasslands of the Great Plains, a Nebraska ecologist says, bring back high intensity fires
Date:
August 1, 2016
Source:
Ecological Society of America
Summary:
One ecologist wants to change the way we think about prescribed burns. The professor says he can harness extreme fire to restore grasslands  on the Great Plains -- 
and he has created a small drone that launches ping-pong balls of fire  LilD
to help him do it safely and cheaply.

[Image: 160801165014_1_540x360.jpg]
This is a UAS prototype for fire ignitions, from figure 4 of Twidwell D et al (2016) Front Ecol Environ 14(6): 333-339.
[i]Credit: ESA[/i]



Ecologist Dirac Twidwell wants to change the way we think about prescribed burns.

[Image: Unabomber-sketch.png]  lol.
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#10
Drone pilots gather on NYC island for racing championship
August 5, 2016 by Michael Balsamo

[Image: dronepilotsg.jpg]
A pilot flies a small racing drone through an obstacle course on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York Harbor, Friday, Aug. 5, 2016. Drone pilots are gathering in New York City to compete in the National Drone Racing Championship. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)


Tyler Brennan is training to be a pilot in the Air Force, yet this weekend he'll be vying to be top gun 

at the National Drone Racing Championship.


The 22-year-old Air Force lieutenant traveled from Colorado Springs, Colorado, to compete in the tournament, which is being held in New York City this weekend. Brennan is one of more than 100 pilots vying for a $50,000 prize.
"I found it on YouTube and I was hooked immediately," Brennan said of the sport, which is still finding a following. "My first time, I was like, 'I got it. I am hooked here' and I crashed almost immediately . But that split second that you get has you hooked for life."
Dozens of pilots gathered for a practice event Friday on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York Harbor.
With spectators watching from a viewing stand, the pilots donned headsets that gave them a cockpit view as they remotely directed their drones—most no larger than a paperback book—through an obstacle course of gates and flags at speeds up to 60 mph.
The competitors fly using first-person view headsets, which allow them to see as if they were inside the tiny drones, said Scot Refsland, the founder and chairman of Drone Sports Association, which is helping to put on the tournament.
[Image: 1-dronepilotsg.jpg]
Pilots fly their small racing drones through an obstacle course on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York Harbor, Friday, Aug. 5, 2016. Drone pilots are gathering in New York City to compete in the National Drone Racing Championship. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
A small mesh net is the only thing separating the spectators from the action. Spectators stood on the side lines, their smartphones in hand, capturing video of the small crafts whizzing by. Participants needed to pass through qualifying competitions in order to race.
The tournament, which is being broadcast on ESPN3, draws competitors of all ages.
The youngest racer, 12-year-old Sorell Miller, of Boise, Idaho, will face off against dozens of other racers, including his father, Conrad.
[Image: 2-dronepilotsg.jpg]
Competitor Tyler Brennan, a 22-year-old Air Force lieutenant from Colorado Springs, Colo., works on a quad copter before flying his racing drone through the obstacle course on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York …more
Brennan says he hopes the competition persuades people that they shouldn't be afraid of the craft, which tend to make news headlines only when someone is using one improperly.
"Nobody here will you see flying in airspace they aren't supposed to be, flying near a wildfire or doing anything they aren't supposed to do," he said. "I hope this introduces drone racing and can show people that drones aren't something that sits outside your window and spies on you—not at all in any way, shape or form. This is a sport."
After this, he said he's going to focus on preparing to fly much bigger machines.
"This is my real hurrah," Brennan said. "After this, I'm concentrating on flying for the Air Force and this will remain a side sport."
[Image: 3-dronepilotsg.jpg]
Pilots flew their small racing drones through an obstacle course on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York Harbor, Friday, Aug. 5, 2016. Drone pilots are gathering in New York City to compete in the National Drone Racing Championship. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

[Image: 4-dronepilotsg.jpg]
Course designer Scot Refsland, center, schools pilots before they fly their small drones through the obstacle course on Governors Island, a former military installation in New York Harbor, Friday, Aug. 5, 2016. Drone pilots are gathering in New York City to compete in the National Drone Racing Championship. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: US moves toward mandatory registration of drones


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-08-drone-nyc-i...p.html#jCp[url=http://phys.org/news/2016-08-drone-nyc-island-championship.html#jCp][/url]



5472 Nurse Alium  

[Image: image_2fc196dc.jpeg?region=0%2C0%2C1560%2C878&width=768]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#11
Image flying on a broom through all that same as Quidish in 3D.

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
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#12
...
Police drones could deliver a C4 funeral to uncooperative Reefer suspects Pimp
that have been scheduled for termination Whip

As such, 
quick strike tactics by terrorists that are adept at short range drone delivery packages,
or common conspiracy to commit murder,
will find drones to be a novel option.
It would probably be fairly easy to drone transport expensive drugs across the Mexican border.

I don't like drones.
They are loud, obnoxious and nasty when near by, 
and are too surveillance capable from a distance. 

I feel that I should have the right to take out a lingering drone that is below 100-150 feet elevation,
within my property lines.
Being in the county here, I feel that I should legally be allowed to shoot it down. 
If I have a No Trespassing sign on my property,
that includes drones.
If I have to ... Lol ... I can paint No Trespassing on my house roof.
...
Reply
#13
Quote:Police drones could deliver a C4 funeral to uncooperative [Image: reefer.gif] suspects [Image: pimp.gif]

that have been scheduled for termination [Image: whip.gif]


That is exactly what EYE inferred.

Couple that with this:

Tyler Brennan is training to be a pilot in the Air Force, yet this weekend he'll be vying to be top gun 

at the National Drone Racing Championship.


These things could be so high up in the sky you'd never truly hear them.

Then they pull a SpaceX/Blue Origin Top-down manuever and whirr up the engines @ the last 3 seconds and itza'll over with but the Dying Atombomb


Don't go to a Royal Saudi Wedding anytime soon  even if you are the best man or the bridesmaid because the boquet will catch YOU!!!
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#14
So, just how much better, more powerful have drones become over the last five years?
This loner isn't the only one thinking in these terms.

Only a matter of time.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/could-model-a...tml?ref=gs
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#15
(08-06-2016, 03:10 AM)Vianova Wrote: ...
Police drones could deliver a C4 funeral to uncooperative Reefer suspects Pimp
that have been scheduled for termination Whip

I feel that I should have the right to take out a lingering drone that is below 100-150 feet elevation,
within my property lines.
Being in the county here, I feel that I should legally be allowed to shoot it down. 
If I have a No Trespassing sign on my property,
that includes drones.
If I have to ... Lol ... I can paint No Trespassing on my house roof.
...

You do NOT have to have a No Trespassing sign on your roof, just on your PROPERTY.  I have several and NONE on a roof but I have one on my front lawn one step from my property line into my land and staked into the ground with NO Trespassing on BOTH sides of the line.  If my neighbors trash keeps flying into my property because THEY litter and the wind blows empty cigarette packs, I can LEGALLY press charges.  If they come over to kock on door, I can also IMMEDIATELY have them arrested.

Got this information from State Police and Sheriff Departments.  With the sign ANYWHERE visible from road in any direction, anyone or thing on your property can be disposed of as you see fit, that includes shooting down the drones.

Load the Shotguns with two shells one scatter and other plug shot, AIM and shoot ! Jacked

Not jacking thread but only smile that has gun.

Bob... Ninja Reefer
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
#16
Damned ...in the last few minutes I have conflated up the notion
of drone hunting and even drone fishing...
Tesla invented the drone boat......

https://www.engadget.com/2014/01/19/niko...trol-boat/

German application...

Reply
#17
This is more like it!!!  LilD



Photos: For the First Time, a Drone Carried Blood Samples from a Remote Village

By Live Science Staff | August 12, 2016 08:08am ET

For people living in remote villages in Madagascar's Ifanadiana district, where there are no roads, travel can be treacherous. Now, researchers have used a drone for the first time to fly a long distance to a village, land, retrieve biomedical samples, and then relaunch and return to a central health care facility. These are the images of that journey.

[Image: DroneWithVillagers.jpeg?interpolation=la...ide|*:1400]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#18
Looks like a home made job using 4 smaller ones onto a foam-like larger drone.

But still GOOD use and should be a step forward right direction.

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
#19
Virtual top hats allow swarming robots to fly in tight formation
May 15, 2017
[Image: virtualtopha.jpg]

The quadcopters wear virtual 'top hats,' to avoid flying underneath each other. Credit: Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a team of free-flying robots that obeys the two rules of the air: don't collide or undercut each other. They've also built autonomous blimps that recognize hand gestures and detect faces.


Both projects will be presented at the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) May 29 - June 3 in Singapore.

In the first, five swarm quadcopters zip back and forth in formation, then change their behaviors based on user commands. The trick is to maneuver without smacking into each other or flying underneath another machine. If a robot cuts into the airstream of a higher flying quadcopter, the lower machine must quickly recover from the turbulent air or risk falling out of the sky.

"Ground robots have had built-in safety 'bubbles' around them for a long time to avoid crashing," said Magnus Egerstedt, the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering professor who oversees the project. "Our quadcopters must also include a cylindrical 'do not touch' area to avoid messing up the airflow for each other. They're basically wearing virtual top hats."

As long as the Georgia Tech machines avoid flying in the two-foot space below their neighbor, they can swarm freely without a problem. That typically means they dart around each other rather than going low.




Ph.D. student Li Wang figured out the size of the "top hat" one afternoon by hovering one copter in the air and sending others back and forth underneath it. Any closer than 0.6 of a meter (or five times the diameter from one rotor to another) and the machines were blasted to the ground. Then he created doink-head to allow them to change formation midflight.

"We figured out the smallest amount of modifications a quadcopter must make to its planned path to achieve the new formation," said Wang. "Mathematically, that's what a programmer wants—the smallest deviations from an original flight plan."

The project is part of Egerstedt and Wang's overall research, which focuses on easily controlling and interacting with large teams of robots.
"Our skies will become more congested with autonomous machines, whether they're used for deliveries, agriculture or search and rescue," said Egerstedt, who directs Georgia Tech's Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines. "It's not possible for one person to control dozens or hundreds of robots at a time. That's why we need machines to figure it out themselves."

The researchers overseeing the second project, the blimps, 3D-printed a gondola frame that carries sensors and a mini camera. It attaches to either an 18- or 36-inch diameter balloon. The smaller blimp can carry a five-gram payload; the larger one supports 20 grams.

The autonomous blimps detect faces and hands, allowing people to direct the flyers with movements. All the while, the machine gathers information about its human operator, identifying everything from hesitant glares to eager smiles. The goal is to better understand how people interact with flying robots.
"Roboticists and psychologists have learned many things about how humans relate to robots on the ground, but we haven't created techniques to study how we react to flying machines," said Fumin Zhang, the Georgia Tech associate professor leading the blimp project. "Flying a regular drone close to people presents a host of issues. But people are much more likely to approach and interact with a slow-moving blimp that looks like a toy."
The blimps' circular shape makes them harder to steer with manual controllers, but allows them to turn and quickly change direction. This is unlike the more popular zeppelin-shaped blimps commonly used by other researchers.
Zhang has filed a request with Guinness World Records for the smallest autonomous blimp. He sees a future where blimps can play a role in people's lives, but only if roboticists can determine what people want and how they'll react to a flying companion.
"Imagine a blimp greeting you at the front of the hardware store, ready to offer assistance," Zhang said. "People are good at reading people's faces and sensing if they need help or not. Robots could do the same. And if you needed help, the blimp could ask, then lead you to the correct aisle, flying above the crowds and out of the way."


[Image: img-dot.gif] Explore further: Team of robots learns to work together, without colliding
Provided by Georgia Institute of Technology

https://techxplore.com/news/2017-05-virt...tight.html

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#20

New drones will travel 1,200 mph and keep up with fighter jets
[Image: Kratos-cover.png&w=1484]

Drones could soon fly fast enough to scout ahead of super-sonic jets and fend off enemy attacks, reports the Washington Post, an enormous advance from current drones that are used primarily for surveillance.
The drones, developed by Kratos for the Pentagon's Silicon Valley lab, can travel 4,000 miles, at 1,200 mph, and fly alongside the workhorse F-16 or F-35 stealth jets.
Why it matters: A question is whether the drones, reusable and costing just $2-$3 million each, can fly autonomously. But, flown alongside jets costing $100-$150 million, they are potentially a real value play to the degree they can serve as decoys and draw off enemy fire. As of now, the new drones are still partly reliant on a pilot to monitor them.


https://www.axios.com/new-drones-could-f...58192.html

We  don't stand a chance...Cry

A little hexacopter shows off acrobatic moves

June 14, 2017 by Nancy Owano
[Image: alittlehexac.jpg]
Watching the little machine in action is like watching some proud circus performer vie for full audience attention in making athletic moves on wires and swings. This machine though shows what is humanly possible in making drones move in more agile ways.


This is the Voliro drone, an omnidirectional hexacopter that signifies the team's mission.

"Multicopters are on the rise and redefine agility and maneuverability in the air. We want to take this further ...."

They are members of an interdisciplinary team of 11 college students from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich) and Zurich University of the Arts (ZHdK). They focused on bringing forth this prototype for 9 months. Their fields include mechanical and electrical engineering at ETH, and they were at work with industrial design students from ZHdK.

The video notes said "Unlike standard multicopters, the position and the orientation are completely decoupled and can be steered independently. This is achieved by six additional tilting motors which allow the rotor units to turn around its axes."

Dani Deahl in The Verge remarked on this —with its individually tiltable axes—calling it "an acrobatic wonderdrone."

It was developed to hover in any orientation. That is where it merits special attention.

Cliff Li, a mechanical engineering student who served as team leader on the project, told Digital Trends about the significance.

He said "multicopters are not unlimited in their flying capabilities. To hover, they have to stay horizontal, and to move they have to tilt. For the Voliro hexacopter this is not necessary. It can turn in midair, and move in any direction, no matter how it is oriented. It can fly vertically, upside down, or at any other angle, and proves that completely unrestricted flight is possible."






New Atlas remarked how "each of its six props can tilt a full 360 degrees, allowing a staggering 12 degrees of freedom in the air."
New Atlas said that its ability to hug walls "could be a huge advantage in infrastructure inspection jobs and the like."

Nonetheless, the project team so far wanted to show how this thing moves but its potential for application in real life is on their minds as they move forward.

"Li said that the project has been more about demonstrating that omnidirectional fight is feasible than focusing on use-cases, but these applications are things the team might focus on next."

Li in Digital Trends talked about potential use cases.

Modules attached on the underside of the hexacopter would bring on extra functionalities. Li said that "One example is a camera module. The hexacopter can act as a gimbal and therefore doesn't need one. It can also fly upside down and take footage of what is above the rotors, which is impossible for a regular multicopter with a gimbal. Another example is interaction with walls and various curved structures, as it can adapt its orientation to that of the surface."

They have items on a to-do list as they move forward. One of their ambitions is to develop intuitive user control—by that they mean to be able to control all 6 DOF's by moving your hand.

They are considering a large sphere in its center whereby it could roll omnidirectionally on the ground.
All in all, the team sees its value as expanding the potential of drones. "As it can fly vertically, it could also drive with a chassis on a wall and perform tasks like bridge inspection or creating paintings on the wall."

https://techxplore.com/news/2017-06-hexa...batic.html
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Reply
#21
I still say it is LEGAL even in NYS where I can't even buy a taser, to buy a shotgun and use buckshot to down ANY drone within range over your property, if You've got a rife you can shoot it down aiming for middle.

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
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Reply
#22
Cry Ninja


X-ray eyes in the sky: New method for 3-D through-wall imaging that utilizes drones and WiFi
June 19, 2017 by Sonia Fernandez

[Image: 5948260d3a122.jpg]
Researchers at UC Santa Barbara professor Yasamin Mostofi's lab have given the first demonstration of three-dimensional imaging of objects through walls using ordinary wireless signal. The technique, which involves two drones working in tandem, could have a variety of applications, such as emergency search-and-rescue, archaeological discovery and structural monitoring.



"Our proposed approach has enabled unmanned aerial vehicles to image details through walls in 3D with only WiFi signals," said Mostofi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at UCSB. "This approach utilizes only WiFi RSSI measurements, does not require any prior measurements in the area of interest and does not need objects to move to be imaged."
The proposed methodology and experimental results appeared in the Association for Computing Machinery/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN) in April, 2017.
In their experiment, two autonomous octocopters take off and fly outside an enclosed, four-sided brick house whose interior is unknown to the drones. While in flight, one copter continuously transmits a WiFi signal, the received power of which is measured by the other copter for the purpose of 3D imaging. After traversing a few proposed routes, the copters utilize the imaging methodology developed by the researchers to reveal the area behind the walls and generate 3D high-resolution images of the objects inside. The 3D image closely matches the actual area.
"High-resolution 3D imaging through walls, such as brick walls or concrete walls, is very challenging, and the main motivation for the proposed approach," said Chitra R. Karanam, the lead Ph.D. student on this project.



This development builds on previous work in the Mostofi Lab, which has pioneered sensing and imaging with everyday radio frequency signals such as WiFi. The lab published the first experimental demonstration of imaging with only WiFi in 2010, followed by several other works on this subject.
"However, enabling 3D through-wall imaging of real areas is considerably more challenging due to the considerable increase in the number of unknowns," said Mostofi. While their previous 2D method utilized ground-based robots working in tandem, the success of the 3D experiments is due to the copters' ability to approach the area from several angles, as well as to the new proposed methodology developed by her lab.


The researchers' approach to enabling 3D through-wall imaging utilizes four tightly integrated key components. First, they proposed robotic paths that can capture the spatial variations in all the three dimensions as much as possible, while maintaining the efficiency of the operation.
Second, they modeled the 3D unknown area of interest as a Markov Random Field to capture the spatial dependencies, and utilized a graph-based belief propagation approach to update the imaging decision of each voxel (the smallest unit of a 3D image) based on the decisions of the neighboring voxels.
Third, in order to approximate the interaction of the transmitted wave with the area of interest, they used a linear wave model.
Finally, they took advantage of the compressibility of the information content to image the area with a very small number of WiFi measurements (less than 4 percent). It is noteworthy that their setup consists solely of off-the-shelf units such as copters, WiFi transceivers and Tango tablets.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Counting people with WiFi
More information: More information about the project can be found at www.ece.ucsb.edu/ymostofi/3DThroughWallImaging.html  
Provided by: University of California - Santa Barbara


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-x-ray-eyes-sky-method-d.html#jCp[/url][url=https://phys.org/news/2017-06-x-ray-eyes-sky-method-d.html#jCp]
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#23
Driverless hover-taxi makes first 'concept' flight in Dubai
September 25, 2017

[Image: 59c93b62089d2.jpg]
Dubai has edged closer to its goal of launching a pioneering hover-taxi service, with the authorities announcing a successful "concept" flight was made on Monday without passengers.




Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-driverless-hover-taxi-concept-flight-dubai.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#24
I saw an Amazon commercial that featured a very short view of a drone taking off.

The indication is that soon there will be swarms of them.
Reply
#25
...
what a joke,
the Hover-Taxi's  Nonono  way

Rofl

Fill them full of Chinese businessmen,
take them to the royal whore house,
then take them back to the hotel,
take them back to the whorehouse the next night,
then take them back to the hotel.

Hover-Taxi royal whorehouse service in Dubai.
Sleasy Chinese businessmen very satisfied with service.
Everybody got a big tip,
in the Dubai royal whore house,
and on the hover taxi back to the hotel room.
...
Reply
#26
Quote:Hover-Taxi royal whorehouse service in Dubai.[Image: ritz-carlton-Riyadh-saudi-arabia-getty-640x480.jpg]‘No Special Treatment’: Saudi Arabia Reportedly Turns Ritz-Carlton into Detention Center for Royals
Sleasy Chinese businessmen very satisfied with service.

Nasa wants you to leave your goobers in ubers  Banana_hump

NASA is working with Uber on its flying taxi project
  • Uber partnered with NASA on it its flying taxi project called Uber Elevate
  • Uber will be working with NASA to figure out traffic management for flying cars
  • Uber also said that it is aiming to trial the flying taxis in Los Angeles, as well as Dubai and Dallas-Fort Worth in 2020

Arjun Kharpal@ArjunKharpal
Published 13 Hours Ago  Updated 6 Hours AgoCNBC.com

Butt Boobs Blink
[Image: 104829365-4ED5-BL-Uber-110817.600x400.jpg?v=1510163007][/url]
NASA is working with Uber on its flying taxi project  6 Hours Ago | 00:34
[url=https://www.cnbc.com/video/2017/11/08/nasa-is-working-with-uber-on-its-flying-taxi-project.html]

Uber signed a deal with NASA Wednesday to help develop traffic systems for its flying car project which it hopes to start testing in 2020.
The ride-hailing service published details of its "on demand aviation" ambitions last year which it has called Uber Elevate.
It is now stepping up its efforts to make the project a reality. Uber said at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon that it signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA for the development of "unmanned traffic management." This is NASA's push to figure out how unmanned aerial systems (UAS), such as drones that fly at a low altitude, can operate safely.

Uber wants to make vertical take-off and landing vehicles. That will allow their flying cars to take off and land vertically. They will fly at a low altitude.
This is the start-up's first partnership with a U.S. federal government agency. NASA is also working with other companies to develop traffic management for these low altitude vehicles.
"UberAir will be performing far more flights on a daily basis than it has ever been done before. Doing this safely and efficiently is going to require a foundational change in airspace management technologies," Jeff Holden, chief product officer at Uber, said in a statement on Wednesday.
"Combining Uber's software engineering expertise with NASA's decades of airspace experience to tackle this is a crucial step forward for Uber Elevate."
The NASA deal is the latest in a series of partnerships Uber has struck to get UberAir — which is what the new service is called — off the ground.
Earlier this year it said it was working with authorities in Dallas-Fort Worth and Dubai to bring its flying taxis to those cities. It also signed partnerships with aircraft manufacturers and real estate companies to figure out where the take off and landing sites for the flying cars could be.
Uber said Wednesday that it also plans to trial the project in Los Angeles in 2020 along with the already announced cities. The company expects the price of a trip to be competitive with the same journey if done using UberX. It is aiming to get the flying taxi service up before the 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles.


https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/08/uber-nas...taxis.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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Reply
#27
Something else to look up...can a drone fly on Mars?
I think I've read that a winged plane could...

https://www.space.com/28360-nasa-mars-he...drone.html
Reply
#28
(11-09-2017, 09:53 PM)Kalter Rauch Wrote: Something else to look up...can a drone fly on Mars?
I think I've read that a winged plane could...

https://www.space.com/28360-nasa-mars-he...drone.html

[Image: marshelo-879x495.jpg]
A proposed Mars helicopter has made technical progress, but NASA has not made a decision yet on including it on the Mars 2020 mission. Credit: NASA artist’s concept.

KR:  Eye work 4  U   Arrow

Posted by Kalter Rauch - Friday, November 10th, 2017, 12:53 am


Quote:Another concept under development over the last several years is a small helicopter that could fly on a rover mission like Mars 2020, serving as an aerial scout. Tests of the concept, including flying it in a chamber at Mars atmospheric conditions, have been promising, Watzin said.

NASA has not made a decision to include it on Mars 2020, though. “There’s certainly a chance,”  Naughty he said at the MEPAG meeting when asked if it could fly on that mission.

A decision would likely come in a month or two, he added.
Green said the decision to add the helicopter to Mars 2020 will depend on both its technical progress and “an adequate budget” to complete its development.

“It’s going through its reviews.

Itza going through Itza Review  Arrow Recall: http://thehiddenmission.com/forum/forumd...d=7&page=2
So far, it’s doing well,” he said. “It has a ways to go.”
Another concept under development over the last several years is a small helicopter that could fly on a rover mission like Mars 2020, serving as an aerial scout. Tests of the concept, including flying it in a chamber at Mars atmospheric conditions, have been promising, Watzin said.

NASA has not made a decision to include it on Mars 2020, though. “There’s certainly a chance,” he said at the MEPAG meeting when asked if it could fly on that mission. A decision would likely come in a month or two, he added.
Green said the decision to add the helicopter to Mars 2020 will depend on both its technical progress and “an adequate budget” to complete its development. “It’s going through its reviews. So far, it’s doing well,” he said. “It has a ways to go.”



Back to Earth...

Our future air taxi? Vahana self-flying machine takes off, hovers, lands
February 23, 2018 by Nancy Owano, Tech Xplore

[Image: 5a908e1e99711.jpg]
What was that hovering, helicopter-like, over the tarmac in Pendleton, Oregon? A flight test of sorts has transportation watchers wondering if we are looking at a significant new chapter in personal transportation, especially for short-distance travel in urban areas.

This January test was to see how a self-flying aircraft was shaping up, also being described in some sites as the flying taxi. If successful, it may be a way to beat late-afternoon road traffic nightmares, pileups, closed bridges, short fuses and road rage.
"At 8:52AM on January 31, 2018 in Pendleton, Oregon," the aircraft reached a height of 5 meters (16 feet) before descending safely."
This is the Airbus Vahana project. Its team has a vision of "large-scale automated flight within urban environments."
"Airbus aims to create self-flying aircraft that can go four times faster than road traffic, with a range of 50 miles," said Seeking Alpha on Thursday.
Vahana's test flight took place last month. The test involved an electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft.
Reports elsewhere said this was a vertical take-off and landing that lasted for 53 seconds.
The video was just recently presented on the flying taxi mission. The Vahana team successfully flew their all-electric aircraft, which hovered above the ground briefly, but it was still a 53-second flight all on its own, without the input of a human operator, said Mariella Moon in Engadget. So what's the big deal?

Moon said, "it was a huge deal for the team and the company. If they succeed, Airbus could eventually use the drone for an autonomous passenger network that will give people a way to hail a flying taxi to get to where they want to go."
The aircraft has 8 propellers. As Fast Company described, "For most of a journey, Vahana's wings will be tilted horizontal to the ground, like a regular airplane. But on takeoff and landing, they tilt into vertical orientation." Fast Company said, "The aerospace giant is developing the air taxi out of its startup-style A3 Silicon Valley skunkworks."

"We are the Silicon Valley outpost of Airbus," according to a project page. The team takes on Vahana as a project developing the first electric, self-piloted #VTOL passenger aircraft."
Specifications for the Vahana test aircraft flown on January 31, 2018 are width: 6.2 m / 20.3 ft; length: 5.7 m / 18.7 ft; height: 2.8 m / 9.2 ft; and takeoff weight: 745 kg / 1642 lb.
So what's next for this project? Zach Lovering, project executive, wrote earlier this month that "the Vahana team will continue development and perform further flight tests to transition and forward flight."
He announced their new partner for motors, California-based MAGicALL. The latter makes components such as motors, generators, inductors and transformers.
"We will begin using the MAGicALL motors soon," he said.
Now over to the user side of the equation.
How easily will people, no matter how weary of road traffic delays, warm to the this alternative way to get from point A to point B?
TechCrunch's Darrell Etherington commented on the future. "Personal autonomous flight vehicles still seem pretty far out there, but company's like Airbus are investing in its potential, and leading technologists like Sebastian Thrun think they could even leapfrog autonomous cars in terms of develop pace and practical usability, so watch this space."
[Image: img-dot.gif] Explore further: Airbus tests self-flying taxi
More information: vahana.aero/vahanas-first-flig … success-ade26d26ba02


Chance. Arrow
Recurrences in an isolated quantum many-body system
February 23, 2018, Vienna University of Technology


[Image: quantumrecur.jpg]
Recurrence can be demonstrated with balls in a box: when they start out in an ordered state, they will become more disordered. But at some point, they will return to the initial state -- it just might take a while. Credit: TU Wien

Wholly  Sheep  Holy Jesus Christ

People can flit through air like angels in Ezekial!!!

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-02-recurrence...y.html#jCp
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Reply
#29
From your space.com link...

"Engineers at the space agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, are developing a 2.2-lb. (1 kilogram) helicopter drone for Mars that measures 3.6 feet (1.1 meters) from blade tip to blade tip. This aerial system could be deployed by NASA's 2020 Mars rover, and would work in partnership with the six-wheeled robot."
Reply
#30
...
I have not kept up with this thread, but just scanned through it again.
My thoughts ... imediately went to:
drone intercept technology,
because I don't like drones ... and heck, 
it should be a piece of cake to develop a simple  Intercept System ...
and pirate away drone and merchandise,
or just scratch one from the sky and watch it ... plinko ... to the ground  Applause
obviously
with federal penalties involving many years in prison ... but i will watch the kids take them out

so i went to ... drone intercept technology,
an obviously impending  defense initiative

https://theintercept.com/2018/03/06/goog...g-project/
GOOGLE HAS QUIETLY secured a contract to work on the Defense Department’s 
new algorithmic warfare initiative, 
providing assistance with a pilot project to apply its artificial intelligence solutions to drone targeting.
... ambitious plan called the Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, 
code-named Project Maven. 
The initiative, Work wrote in an agency-wide memo, 
is designed to “accelerate DoD’s integration of big data and machine learning” 
and “turn the enormous volume of data available to DoD into actionable intelligence and insights at speed.”


https://www.brookings.edu/blog/techtank/...e-a-drone/
6 ways to disable a drone
Nets are a much safer alternative to capturing drones than shooting them with guns. 
Tokyo police are working to implement net-carrying drones ;whip:
that can intercept suspicious smaller drones. 
The Human-Interactive Robotics Lab at Michigan Tech is working a drone catcher system 
for removing intruding drones by developing a drone-mounted net cannon Rofl
that can capture another drone in flight from a distance of up to 40 feet. 
Lastly, there’s anti-drone technology that can be assembled from hardware store items. 
The drone net gun 
is a plastic slingshot 
that releases a net from the user on the ground to capture a drone in-flight  Applause

[Image: 1423666543-nailed.gif]



http://dronecatcher.nl/
DroneCatcher is a net gun armed multicopter.
[Image: DC-features.jpg]


https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/...ept-drones
DHS, Other Agencies Seek Law Changes To Intercept Drones


http://www.jpost.com/Business-and-Innova...ogy-496344
ISRAELI COMPANY SHOWCASES DRONE INTERCEPTION TECHNOLOGY
ORAD’s DROM system can take over device’s piloting from operator.

[Image: ShowImage.ashx?id=384858]
HOLON-BASED ORAD has engineered a 38-kg. drone-defense system 
that is mobile and easily deployed on land or at sea in any weather conditions. 
...
Reply
#31
Speaking of flying Drones....

Mars Helicopter to Fly on NASA's Next Red Planet Rover Mission

News | May 11, 2018

[Image: helicopter20180511-16.jpg]

The Mars Helicopter, a small, autonomous rotorcraft, will travel with NASA's Mars 2020 rover, currently scheduled to launch in July 2020, to demonstrate the viability and potential of heavier-than-air vehicles on the Red Planet. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Larger view
[/url]
NASA is sending a helicopter to Mars.

The Mars Helicopter, a small, autonomous rotorcraft, will travel with the agency's [url=https://www.nasa.gov/mars2020]Mars 2020
rover mission, currently scheduled to launch in July 2020, to demonstrate the viability and potential of heavier-than-air vehicles on the Red Planet.

"NASA has a proud history of firsts," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. "The idea of a helicopter flying the skies of another planet is thrilling. The Mars Helicopter holds much promise for our future science, discovery, and exploration missions to Mars."



› Larger view
NASA is sending a helicopter to Mars.

The Mars Helicopter, a small, autonomous rotorcraft, will travel with the agency's Mars 2020 rover mission, currently scheduled to launch in July 2020, to demonstrate the viability and potential of heavier-than-air vehicles on the Red Planet.

"NASA has a proud history of firsts," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. "The idea of a helicopter flying the skies of another planet is thrilling. The Mars Helicopter holds much promise for our future science, discovery, and exploration missions to Mars."


The Mars Helicopter is a technology demonstration that will travel to the Red Planet with the Mars 2020 rover. It will attempt controlled flight in Mars' thin atmosphere, which may enable more ambitious missions in the future.


U.S. Rep. John Culberson of Texas echoed Bridenstine's appreciation of the impact of American firsts on the future of exploration and discovery.

"It's fitting that the United States of America is the first nation in history to fly the first heavier-than-air craft on another world," Culberson said. "This exciting and visionary achievement will inspire young people all over the United States to become scientists and engineers, paving the way for even greater discoveries in the future."

Started in August 2013 as a technology development project at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Mars Helicopter had to prove that big things could come in small packages. The result of the team's four years of design, testing and redesign weighs in at little under four pounds (1.8 kilograms). Its fuselage is about the size of a softball, and its twin, counter-rotating blades will bite into the thin Martian atmosphere at almost 3,000 rpm -- about 10 times the rate of a helicopter on Earth.

"Exploring the Red Planet with NASA's Mars Helicopter exemplifies a successful marriage of science and technology innovation and is a unique opportunity to advance Mars exploration for the future," said Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate at the agency headquarters in Washington. "After the Wright Brothers proved 117 years ago that powered, sustained, and controlled flight was possible here on Earth, another group of American pioneers may prove the same can be done on another world."
The helicopter also contains built-in capabilities needed for operation at Mars, including solar cells to charge its lithium-ion batteries, and a heating mechanism to keep it warm through the cold Martian nights. But before the helicopter can fly at Mars it has to get there. It will do so attached to the belly pan of the Mars 2020 rover.


"The altitude record for a helicopter flying here on Earth is about 40,000 feet. The atmosphere of Mars is only one percent that of Earth, so when our helicopter is on the Martian surface, it's already at the Earth equivalent of 100,000 feet up," said Mimi Aung, Mars Helicopter project manager at JPL. "To make it fly at that low atmospheric density, we had to scrutinize everything, make it as light as possible while being as strong and as powerful as it can possibly be."

Once the rover is on the planet's surface, a suitable location will be found to deploy the helicopter down from the vehicle and place it onto the ground. The rover then will be driven away from the helicopter to a safe distance from which it will relay commands. After its batteries are charged and a myriad of tests are performed, controllers on Earth will command the Mars Helicopter to take its first autonomous flight into history.

"We don't have a pilot and Earth will be several light minutes away, so there is no way to joystick this mission in real time," said Aung.

"Instead, we have an autonomous capability that will be able to receive and interpret commands from the ground, and then fly the mission on its own."

The full 30-day flight test campaign will include up to five flights of incrementally farther flight distances, up to a few hundred meters, and longer durations as long as 90 seconds, over a period. On its first flight, the helicopter will make a short vertical climb to 10 feet (3 meters), where it will hover for about 30 seconds.

As a technology demonstration, the Mars Helicopter is considered a high-risk, high-reward project. If it does not work, the Mars 2020 mission will not be impacted. If it does work, helicopters may have a real future as low-flying scouts and aerial vehicles to access locations not reachable by ground travel.


"The ability to see clearly what lies beyond the next hill is crucial for future explorers," said Zurbuchen. "We already have great views of Mars from the surface as well as from orbit. With the added dimension of a bird's-eye view from a 'marscopter,' we can only imagine what future missions will achieve."

Mars 2020 will launch on a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, and is expected to reach Mars in February 2021.

The rover will conduct geological assessments of its landing site on Mars, determine the habitability of the environment, search for signs of ancient Martian life, and assess natural resources and hazards for future human explorers. Scientists will use the instruments aboard the rover to identify and collect samples of rock and soil, encase them in sealed tubes, and leave them on the planet's surface for potential return to Earth on a future Mars mission.

The Mars 2020 Project at JPL in Pasadena, California, manages rover development for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA's Launch Services Program, based at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is responsible for launch management.

For more information about NASA's Mars missions, go to:

https://www.nasa.gov/mars

News Media Contact
DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown / JoAnna Wendel
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726 / 202-358-1003
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov / joanna.r.wendel@nasa.gov

2018-096

----

#2020CydoniaRover ...just crashed that landing site I think

Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
#32
A drone could work really well on Titan.
Reply
#33
To me adding a drone is a Doh  kinda thing.  Elon should ask to send along one of his OWN small cube-sat drones that also could be rechargeable on the NUKE powered rover.

They should have PLANNED to add one from the beginning on Curiosity as well as Insight, and certainly the 2020 Rover and ANYTHING else flying to land on Mars or anywhere else.  The technology is THERE, their political backbone is simply GONE !!!   Pennywise 


Bob.... Ninja Assimilated
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
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