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The Gov't will Go to the Moon and Mars, Rite after this commercial break...
(09-28-2017, 10:05 AM)Wook Wrote: Cool !

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-n...imir-Putin

We'll get back to the Gov'ts...

Rite after this commercial break.  Arrow

  Cooler!!!   LilD


SpaceX's Elon Musk, Lockheed Martin Announcing Updated Mars Plans Tonight

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | September 28, 2017 07:00am ET

Tonight (Sept. 28), SpaceX and Lockheed Martin will unveil their latest plans for getting people to Mars.

Both companies will do so at the 68th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Adelaide, Australia. First up is Lockheed, which will announce updates to its "Mars Base Camp" concept at 6 p.m. EDT (2200 GMT; 7:30 a.m. Friday local Adelaide time). You can watch the presentation via Australia's Science Channel



Then, at 12:30 a.m. EDT Friday (0430 GMT; 2 p.m. Adelaide time), SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk will reveal changes to the company's Mars-colonization architecture, which Musk first announced last year at the 67th IAC in Mexico. [SpaceX's Interplanetary Transport for Mars in Images]
"Major improvements & some unexpected applications to be unveiled on Friday at @IAC2017 in Australia," he said via Twitter Monday (Sept. 25). 

[img=553x0]https://img.purch.com/w/640/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kvMDAwLzA3MC80MjMvaTAyL3NwYWNleC1tYXJzLWludGVycGxhbmV0YXJ5LXRyYW5zcG9ydGVyLWxhdW5jaC5qcGc/MTUwNjU2NjMxNQ==[/img][Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...A2NTY2MzE1]



Artist's illustration of SpaceX's planned Interplanetary Transport System launching a colony ship toward Mars. This artwork is based on the architecture Elon Musk unveiled in September 2016; the SpaceX founder and CEO will reveal an updated version on the night of Sept. 28, 2017.

Credit: SpaceX

"Headed to Adelaide soon to describe new BFR planetary colonizer design in detail @IAC2017. This should be worth seeing. Design feels right," Musk added in another tweet Tuesday (Sept. 26). (BFR stands for Big F***ing Rocket.)
SpaceX webcast Musk's talk at last year's IAC live and will do so again for the upcoming presentation at www.spacex.com/webcast. You can also watch Musk's Mars colonization talk live on Space.com here, courtesy of SpaceX.



Lockheed's idea centers on a six-person space station, which company representatives have said could be orbiting the Red Planet by 2028 or so. The astronauts aboard this Mars Base Camp could perform a variety of valuable scientific and exploration work, from operating rovers in near-real time on the surface to scouting out spots for future crewed landings, project team members have said.

"The presentation will include a look at how Mars Base Camp aligns with NASA’s lunar Deep Space Gateway, and a debut of a crewed Mars lander concept," Lockheed representatives said in a media advisory about Thursday's IAC talk.


At last year's IAC meeting, Musk unveiled SpaceX's planned Interplanetary Transport System (ITS), a huge, reusable rocket-spaceship combo designed to help establish a million-person city on Mars in the next 50 to 100 years. The 40-foot-wide (12 meters) booster would feature 42 Raptor engines and be more than twice as powerful as NASA's Saturn V moon rocket. The ITS spaceship, meanwhile, would be capable of carrying a minimum of 100 people to the Red Planet.

Though Musk hasn't revealed what the "major improvements" to this original design might be, there's reason to believe the new iteration may scale things back a bit. In July, a Twitter user asked Musk for hints about the new architecture. "A 9m diameter vehicle fits in our existing factories ... " Musk responded.


https://www.space.com/38299-elon-musk-sp...plans.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#2020CydoniaRover

S     P     E   A     D            I    T           E      V     E     R     Y     W     H     E     R     E  



Cannot wait until tomorrow

[Image: the-martian-giphy.gif]


Bob... Ninja Spacecraft
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
live in 90 minutes  LilD


Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
I'm off to sleep...I'll catch-up tomorrow

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
wakey-wakey!

ITS( Interplanetary Transport System ) NOW called... :

Itza BFR

(Big Fuckin' Rocket!!! ) LilD
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
...
Vishnu traveled the universe within the bulb of a lotus blossom energy sheath,
and when he arrived at a destination, 
he simply emerged from the unfolding lotus blossom envelope, of that energy sheath.

[Image: AAEAAQAAAAAAAACTAAAAJGU2NDNjMWFiLTgyMDYt...MWViMQ.jpg]


That is how mankind needs to travel the stars,
... perhaps, 
after he has stopped trying to destroy himself on his home planet.

space ships  Horsepoop  and space Sheep  stations   Horsepoop


Vishnu's work is never done.
A spiritual perpetual motion machine.
Service with a smile, Eternally Now.
No refueling necessary.
Powered by Pure Cosmic Love.

Cosmic Love is awesome, beautiful and terrifying with and when shit happens. 
It ... loves you to death.
Service with a smile, Eternally Now.

Be sure to smile back, and enjoy the ride on the roller toaster Whip

If you want to be an angel, you probably have to earn your wings.
An Angel's work is never done.
Spiritual perpetual motion machines.
Thatza called ... work ethic ...  Reefer

I will take Angel status any day over the ISS, or the mission to Mars.
Better working conditions for one thing being an Angel Lol
Planetary exploration is old hat.
It's kind of ... been there and done that. 
As relic planetary civilizations decompose,
ashes to ashes 
dust to dust ...

Ancient runes are found in the carved stone ruins,
evidenced as psychedelic heiroglyphs of the sacred psilocybe.

The spores travel the universes,
in the seed purses of interdimensional Angels.

Cosmic Love is awesome, beautiful and terrifying with and when shit happens. 
It ... loves you to death.
Service with a smile, Eternally Now.

Be sure to smile back, and mean it.
Try to be as grateful as you possibly can be,
in appreciating the who, what, where, and why ... of when shit happens to you.

...
Reply
#2020CydoniaRover

S     P     E   A     D            I    T           E      V     E     R     Y     W     H     E     R     E  


"Astronauts of the future hear & touch my words..."- Millenium, Paul Kantner 

I hope to see it happen.  But it seems from his presentation that 2022 is the FIRST time he's going to have the $$$ to send ANYTHING to Mars.

Of course the "New US-Russia Moon Orbital Station" will not be completed by then, even may not even get started by then either.

But I bet the Chinese WILL have another shot at the Moon BEFORE 2022, and possibly Manned Landing on it before USA does.

Russia will likely go along also.  Two Taukinauts & one Cosmonaut, One Chinese with a Fist step followed by the Russian.

Time will tell.

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
"Vishnu traveled the universe within the bulb of a lotus blossom energy sheath,
and when he arrived at a destination, 
he simply emerged from the unfolding lotus blossom envelope, of that energy sheath."

I've got a small stack of HP Blavatsky's Theosophical journals pre-WWII
with the swastika/ouroboros logo.
They have articles about stuff like that.
Reply
I find it noteworthy...

Even before Elon has Launched the falcon heavy he already is proposing it is obsolete compared to BFR tech and Know-how.

Where the progress reached thus far causes him to assure us that The BFR 1st Stage may not even need landing legs and can Arrow descend and dock back down onto itza Landing/Launch clamps.  Holycowsmile

Recall:

He has succesfully landed 16 First Stages.

If the falcon heavy loses 1 rocket...there would still be TWO recovered!  LilD Angel LilD

Net Gain as each booster pays itza dues and accrues to use for a Martian Crew's Cruise on a BFR to Mars.

Musk ,if common sense is utilized must recognize that Tesla Motors has capability of making electric Mars Cars.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
SpaceX: Rocket for moon, Mars and NY-to-Shanghai in 39 mins
September 30, 2017 by Marcia Dunn

[Image: spacexrocket.jpg]
This artist's rendering made available by Elon Musk on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017 shows SpaceX's new mega-rocket design on the Earth's moon. With the 350-foot-tall spacecraft, Musk announced that his private space company aims to launch two cargo missions to Mars in 2022. (SpaceX via AP)
SpaceX chief Elon Musk's elaborate plan for a mega-rocket to carry astronauts to Mars may have some down-to-Earth applications.



At a conference in Australia on Friday, Musk said if you build a ship capable of going to the moon and Mars, why not use it for high-speed transport here at home. He proposes using his still-in-the-design phase rocket for launching passengers from New York to Shanghai in 39 minutes flat.
Los Angeles to New York, or Los Angeles to Honolulu in 25 minutes. London to Dubai in 29 minutes.
"Most of what people consider to be long-distance trips would be completed in less than half an hour," Musk said to applause and cheers at the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide.
A seat should cost about the same as a full-fare economy plane ticket, he noted later via Instagram.
Friday's address was a follow-up to one he gave to the group last September in Mexico, where he unveiled his grand scheme for colonizing Mars. He described a slightly scaled-down 348-foot-tall (106-meter-tall) rocket and announced that the private space company aims to launch two cargo missions to Mars in 2022.
"That's not a typo," he said, pausing, as charts appeared on a large screen. "Although it is aspirational."


[Image: 1-spacexrocket.jpg]
SpaceX chief Elon Musk gestures as he delivers a speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide, Australia, Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. Musk's elaborate plan for a mega-rocket to carry astronauts to Mars may have some down-to-Earth applications. (Morgan Sette/AAP Image via AP)
Two more cargo missions would follow in 2024 to provide more construction materials, along with two crewed flights. The window for launching to Mars occurs every two years.
For the approximately six-month, one-way trips to Mars, the SpaceX ships would have 40 cabins, ideally with two to three people per cabin for a grand total of about 100 passengers. Musk foresees this Mars city growing, and over time "making it really a nice place to be."
Scott Hubbard, an adjunct professor at Stanford University and a former director of NASA's Ames Research Center, calls it "a bold transportation architecture with aspirational dates." A demonstration of some sort in the 2020s will add to its credibility, he said in an email. And while more details are needed for life-support systems, "Kudos to Elon and SpaceX for keeping the focus on humans to Mars!"
Former NASA chief technologist Bobby Braun, now dean of the college of engineering and applied science at the University of Colorado at Boulder, also sees Musk's plan as a step in the right direction, building on technologies SpaceX already has demonstrated, like reusable rockets.


"While the timeline and capabilities are certainly ambitious, I'm bullish on U.S industry's ability to carry out challenging and far-reaching goals," Braun wrote in an email. "It's great to see the private sector lead in this way, and I hope we see more of it."
[Image: 2-spacexrocket.jpg]
This artist's rendering made available by Elon Musk on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017 shows SpaceX's new mega-rocket design at the International Space Station. With the 350-foot-tall spacecraft, Musk announced that his private space company aims to launch two cargo missions to Mars in 2022. (SpaceX via AP)
NASA is charting its own path to what it calls the "Deep Space Gateway," beginning with expeditions in the vicinity of the moon in the 2020s and eventually culminating at Mars. The space agency has handed much of its Earth-orbiting work to private industry, including SpaceX, Orbital ATK and Boeing.
Earlier Friday in Adelaide, Lockheed Martin presented its vision for a "Mars Base Camp" in partnership with NASA. Astronauts could be on their way in about a decade, the company said. This first mission would orbit the red planet, rather than land.
Musk intends to finance his $10 billion Mars endeavor by using a rocket that's smaller than the one outlined last year. Fewer engines would be needed: 31 versus the originally envisioned 42. Its lift capability would be 150 tons, more than NASA's old moon rocket, the Saturn V.
He wants one type of booster and spaceship that can replace the company's current Falcon 9 rocket, the soon-to-fly Falcon Heavy rocket designed for heavier satellites, and the Dragon capsule presently used to deliver cargo to the International Space Station, and, as soon as next year, station astronauts.
That way SpaceX can put all its resources toward this new system, Musk said. Revenue from launching satellites, and sending supplies and crews to the space station, could pay for the new rocket, he said.
[Image: 3-spacexrocket.jpg]
This artist's rendering made available by Elon Musk on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017 shows SpaceX's new mega-rocket design on Mars. With the 350-foot-tall spacecraft, Musk announced that his private space company aims to launch two cargo missions to the red planet in 2022. (SpaceX via AP)
Musk said the same spaceship for moon and Mars trips—long and cylindrical with small shuttle-like wings—could fly to the space station. He said the mega-rocket could be used to establish a lunar settlement, with spaceships being refueled in Earth orbit versus creating a vital fuel depot at Mars.
The mega-rocket doesn't have a name but for now is called BFR. The B is for big; the R for rocket. As for the F, well, you get the idea.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: SpaceX's Musk unveils plan to reach Mars by 2022
More information: SpaceX: www.spacex.com/


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-spacex-roc...i.html#jCp[/url][url=https://phys.org/news/2017-09-spacex-rocket-moon-mars-ny-to-shanghai.html#jCp]




Lockheed Martin unveils reusable water-powered Mars lander
September 29, 2017



[Image: 1-governmentsa.jpg]
Governments and private firms are collaborating on projects to send humans to new frontiers, with NASA planning missions to the space between the earth and moon to prepare for trips to Mars
A reusable, water-powered Mars lander that will allow humans to explore the Red Planet from an orbiting 'base camp' as early as the 2030s was unveiled Friday by US defence giant Lockheed Martin.





Governments and private firms are collaborating on projects to send humans to new frontiers, with NASA planning missions next decade into the space between Earth and the Moon to prepare for trips to Mars.
Lockheed Martin has been working on its "Mars Base Camp", a science laboratory that will orbit the planet, with the crewed lander set to descend to the surface on repeated missions.
"It looks a bit like Jules Verne, but it's actually more like an aircraft that we've flown in the past," Lockheed Martin's human spaceflight strategy chief Rob Chambers said, at a gathering of the world's leading space experts in the Australian city of Adelaide.
Up to four astronauts could join each two-week surface mission, while liquid hydrogen generated from water would fuel the spacecraft, he added.
"We can create that fuel. We can power this entire spacecraft system just with water," said Chambers, describing it as a "water-based economy".
Lockheed Martin is among several companies working on deep space habitats with NASA, which hopes to send the first astronauts to Mars in the 2030s.

Chambers called the Mars vision "a transformational event for our generation", adding: "It's literally (the) dawn of the new age of discovery about ourselves and about our solar system and about our place in it."
The International Astronautical Congress concludes on Friday with a presentation by SpaceX's Elon Musk, who will outline a new design for an interplanetary transport system to take humans to Mars.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Moon village the first stop to Mars: ESA


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-lockheed-martin-unveils-reusable-water-powered.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
...


Quote:launching passengers from New York to Shanghai in 39 minutes flat.

Los Angeles to New York,
or Los Angeles to Honolulu in 25 minutes. 

London to Dubai in 29 minutes.



You will still have to be ready to wait in line for 2 + hours with TSA, 
and
I don't believe the time frames suggested, as possible.

Nonono

I wonder if everybody pukes Yak on a quick trip like that with the gravity pressures.
Still waiting on the video of them cleaning up Hawking,
when he craps his knickers  Tp
and burps up his Starbuck's latte into the helmet face shield after takeoff. 


Reefer

...
Reply
SpaceX takes another- Kick at the can.

Canned the ITS - Downsizing  and morphing into the BFR

By sheer volume I find it easier to visualize Musk's plan.

[Image: dd62c673a76ddef4c3132bd27eddd301.jpg]



Dragon 2's are essentially: "CONES" (obsolete)

Cone shaped Capsules have proven effective and are standard space engineering.

Kick at the can  Arrow

For the Same Base to Height Ratio...Cones CAN't compete with a Cylinder

[Image: volume-cylinder-vs-cone-demonstration.gif] You may note:

For what comprises the payload is a rounded nosecone necessary for high velocity flight.

[Image: spacex-bfr-spaceship-cutaway-design-crew-quarters.png]

The rest of the Rocketry is cylindrical.

[Image: BFR-sections-1200x750.png]

The Propellant tanks and Engines are roughly equivalent to 3 x the payload.

Nearly empty by the time it retrorockets into landing on Mars you bring an entire infrastructure to Launch back Earthward...
In a Compact Container.

[Image: volume-cylinder-vs-cone-demonstration.gif]

[Image: 636422418575439681-spx-iac17-mars-dawn-or-dusk.jpg]

Basically  4 Cone$ on 4 legs.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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NASA considers altering astronaut DNA for Mars mission

Published time: 9 Oct, 2017 12:37


[Image: 59db6a0efc7e93bf128b4567.jpg]

NASA wants to manipulate the DNA of its astronauts headed to Mars to protect them from cancer-causing cosmic radiation.
NASA plans to send its first manned mission to Mars between 2030 and 2040 but still faces a number of obstacles before then.
The Mars-bound astronauts will be exposed to high-energy particles and NASA is looking at ways to repair the damage this would do to their DNA. This could include actually altering the astronauts’ genes and genetic activity.
When humans travel beyond the Earth’s magnetic field for prolonged periods, they are exposed to charged atomic nuclei that can rip through DNA and increase the risk of both cancer and dementia.


According to a 2014 study on space radiation risks, astronauts would be exposed to levels of galactic cosmic ray radiation that would exceed their lifetime limit – within just two years. Astronauts headed to Mars would be exposed to radiation for at least this time period.
The astronauts could have armor or an electromagnetic force field to protect them, but this is not very practical, Douglas Terrier, NASA’s acting chief technologist, told the Times.
“We’re looking at a range of things, from drug therapies, and those seem to be quite promising, to more extreme things like epigenetic modification,” Terrier said. “I think those have a lot of ethical consequences so they’re still in the experimental thought stages.”


Epigenetic modifications would involve altering the way genes are read without changing the actual DNA code. This would be achieved by altering chemicals that control gene volumes so their activity could be silenced or amplified in a given situation.
Genes could also be changed to boost the cell resilience. This way, cancer and radiation-related issues could be prevented from developing.

READ MORE: Space Race 2.0: SpaceX rival Lockheed Martin reveals plan for Mars (PICTURES, VIDEO)
[/url][url=https://www.rt.com/usa/405109-lockheed-martin-spacea-mars/]
The spaceship to Mars would be run by a “strong” artificial intelligence program that could identify diseases and direct robotic surgery, Terrier said. This is necessary because of the 20-minute delay in communicating with Earth.
The 100 million-mile journey to Mars could be sped up with the use of sun-powered ion thrusters which the space agency is developing.

Sources: https://www.rt.com/news/406123-nasa-mars-radiation-dna/


Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
what could go wrong
lol .
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
...
When they start altering our genetics just to go to Mars,
instead of realizing that dynamic propulsion systems are only a decade or so away,
{or putting that money into propulsion development}
well then those NASA monkey brain mother fucker mad scientists,
should be the volunteers,
for  a host of Pharma Terror DNA modifications.

Like ... send them to Merck,
and DNA modify those mad scientists ... into large insect like human critters that are insecticide resistant,
and then test new generation toxic insecticide sprays on them,
and film then while they die,
so that the rest of the NASA scientists get the message Whip

Show them some Pharma Terror used against them.

Fuck NASA for even promoting this idea.
Sick bastards.
These are the same scientists that promote "planetary protection guidelines",
out of one side of their mouths,
and then out the other side of their mouths,
they want to promote GMO bacteria venues to terraform Mars.

This is what is wrong with NASA.
Mad scientists usurp the public funding into sick venues like DNA modification of astronauts.
That is something I would expect the Chinese to do.

No doubt that something is needed for accidental or unforeseen doses of radiation in space travel.
So they need human volunteers on Mars missions, 
pharma terror calls it ---> Challenging the subject.

Ultimately the experimentation will involve cancer reactions from the DNA modifications.
NASA isn't worried about that,
because after you get the cancers a few years later from the DNA modifications,
they will just pump you full of anti cancer drugs,
that the Pharma Terror Corporations Whip
want to also test on NASA astronauts.

in 50 years,
there will be new propulsion systems that will circumvent the need for such DNA / radiation remediation.
So,
I want to see the first NASA astronaut that volunteers to be genetically modified.
That will be one stupid SOB.


...
Reply
https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/...about_bfr/

(10-04-2017, 02:18 PM)EA Wrote: SpaceX takes another- Kick at the can.
https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/...about_bfr/
Canned the ITS - Downsizing  and morphing into the BFR

By sheer volume I find it easier to visualize Musk's plan.
Quote:
[–]__Rocket__ 817 points 1 day ago 
Why is the 2017 BFS spaceship largely cylindrical?
The 2016 ITS spaceship design had a complex geometrical shape with aerodynamic lifting/braking properties.
The new 2017 BFS design uses a largely cylindrical body, with a payload section and two delta wings attached. The diameter of the BFS is now the same 9m as the BFR booster.
Were these changes mainly prompted by a desire to unify the carbon-fiber manufacturing of the cylindrical sections of the BFR and the BFS on a shared 9 meter diameter manufacturing process, or are there other advantages to the new design as well?
[size=undefined]



[–]ElonMuskElon Musk (Official)[S] 825 points 1 day ago 
Best mass ratio is achieved by not building a box in a box. The propellant tanks need to be cylindrical to be remotely mass efficient and they have to carry ascent load, so lowest mass solution is just to mount the heat shield plates directly to the tank wall.[/size]
[size=undefined]


[–]jclishman 43 points 1 day ago 
How do you plan on attaching the heat shield directly to carbon composite, while also remaining structurally sound?[/size]








[–]__Rocket__ 1019 points 1 day ago* 
How does the BFS achieve vertical stabilization, without a tail?
The 2016 BFS spaceship design had a complex unibody geometrical shape with two 'wings' on the sides, a 'tail' protrusion on top, plus split body flaps at the bottom-end, which gave it a fair degree of aerodynamic control freedom. The Space Shuttle had delta wings and a tail too.
The new 2017 BFS spaceship has two delta wings, which gives it pitch and roll control, but does not have an airplane 'tail assembly' equivalent.
How is vertical stabilization achieved on the BFS?
Do the unusually thick (~2m tall) delta wings have vertical stabilization properties perhaps?

[*]

[size=undefined]



[–]painkiller606 1657 points 1 day ago 
The space shuttle's vertical stabilizer was completely useless for most of the reentry profile, as it was in complete aerodynamic shadow. I think it's clear a craft doesn't need one for reentry, only for subsonic gliding, which BFS doesn't really do.[/size]

[*]

[size=undefined]



[–]ElonMuskElon Musk (Official)[S] 2232 points 1 day ago 
+1[/size]



[size=undefined]


[–]Fizrock 787 points 1 day ago 
You don't even need to answer questions. You just leave the questions up, wait until people guess the right thing, then put +1.[/size]



[size=undefined]








[–]ElonMuskElon Musk (Official)[S] 1972 points 1 day ago 
Tails are lame[/size]

[*]

[size=undefined]



[–]MultidimensionalPet 327 points 1 day ago 
My cat just said you don't know what you're talking about, they're handy for stabilisation[/size]

[*]





[–]__Rocket__ 9434 points 1 day ago 
Why was Raptor thrust reduced from ~300 tons-force to ~170 tons-force?
One would think that for (full-flow staged combustion...) rocket engines bigger is usually better: better surface-to-volume ratio, less friction, less heat flow to handle at boundaries, etc., which, combined with the target wet mass of the rocket defines a distinct 'optimum size' sweet spot where the sum of engines reaches the best thrust-to-weight ratio.
Yet Raptor's s/l thrust was reduced from last year's ~300 tons-force to ~170 tons-force, which change appears to be too large of a reduction to be solely dictated by optimum single engine TWR considerations.
What were the main factors that led to this change?



[size=undefined]

[–]ElonMuskElon Musk (Official)[S] 24.9k points 1 day agox2 
We chickened out[/size]

[*]

[size=undefined]



[–]ElonMuskElon Musk (Official)[S] 14.7k points 1 day ago[/url] 
The engine thrust dropped roughly in proportion to the vehicle mass reduction from the first IAC talk. In order to be able to land the BF Ship with an engine failure at the worst possible moment, you have to have multiple engines. The difficulty of deep throttling an engine increases in a non-linear way, so 2:1 is fairly easy, but a deep 5:1 is very hard. Granularity is also a big factor. If you just have two engines that do everything, the engine complexity is much higher and, if one fails, you've lost half your power. Btw, we modified the BFS design since IAC to add a third medium area ratio Raptor engine partly for that reason (lose only 1/3 thrust in engine out) and allow landings with higher payload mass for the Earth to Earth transport function.[/size]
[*]

[size=undefined][–][url=https://www.reddit.com/user/wilwem]wilwem
 58 points 1 day ag[/size]
[*]


Dragon 2's are essentially: "CONES" (obsolete)

Cone shaped Capsules have proven effective and are standard space engineering.

Kick at the can  Arrow

For the Same Base to Height Ratio...Cones CAN't compete with a Cylinder

[Image: volume-cylinder-vs-cone-demonstration.gif] You may note:

For what comprises the payload is a rounded nosecone necessary for high velocity flight.



The rest of the Rocketry is cylindrical.



The Propellant tanks and Engines are roughly equivalent to 3 x the payload.

Nearly empty by the time it retrorockets into landing on Mars you bring an entire infrastructure to Launch back Earthward...
In a Compact Container.

Musk offers more technical details on BFR system
by Jeff Foust — October 15, 2017
[Image: bfr-mars-iac2017-879x485.jpg]SpaceX CEO Elon Musk discussed more technical details about the BFR system designed to take people to Mars and on point-to-point trips on Earth, but didn't discuss financing of the system. Credit: SpaceX

Basically  4 Cone$ on 4 legs.
[*]

https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/...about_bfr/
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
Many thanx for reddit link did not know he was on-line with them, will have join soon. Worship

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
007  Arrow

Ion Thruster Prototype Breaks Records in Tests, Could Send Humans to Mars

By Tereza Pultarova, Space.com Contributor | October 13, 2017 07:00am ET

[Image: MTUwNzgyMTg3NQ==]
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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Quote:"Could send humans to Mars"



You know "could" is NOT the same as WOULD ? Doh   NASA does NOT have ANY "infrastructure" going to Mars itself into mid 2030's "officially"!

I have the Republican Party survey in the mail + $25 check with MY "#1 priority is #2020 Cydonia Rover to help Elon Musk land in 2020 & 2022."

On the line item of "Rebuilding Military" I stated "MORE $ for space machines than killing machines give Elon Musk more $ to get to Mars faster."

I am persistence and unbreakable in this goal.  Musk is targeting just North of Cydonia.  Another of his target came in the "Special Release" October which is stereo of his previous request.  Quickest Stereo pair acquisition I've EVER seen.

I hope NASA/JPL will stop being "NASTY" and start HELPING Musk make humans a Multi-planetary species. ASAP

Elon WILL send a pair of humans from the porn industry around the Moon and back and I hope to get ALL the tapes for THAT trip... Drool

Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
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Infrastructure  Arrow For SpaceX Oxy-Methano-rockets.
Quote:Interplanetary Transport System - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interplane...ort_System
[/url]


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The Interplanetary Transport System (ITS), previously known as the Mars Colonial Transporter ... With the BFRSpaceX is aiming to put the first humans on Mars by 2024. .... the Raptor bipropellant liquid rocket engines on both stages, using exclusively densified liquid [/size]methane[size=undefined] fuel and liquid [/size]oxygen[size=undefined] oxidizer on both stages.[/size]

A mission to Mars could make its own oxygen via plasma technology LilD and methane too!-EA

October 18, 2017



[Image: mars.png]
Credit: NASA
Plasma technology could hold the key to creating a sustainable oxygen supply on Mars, a new study has found.





It suggests that Mars, with its 96 per cent carbon dioxide atmosphere, has nearly ideal conditions for creating oxygen from CO2 through a process known as decomposition.
Published today in the journal Plasma Sources Science and Technology, the research by the universities of Lisbon and Porto, and École Polytechnique in Paris, shows that the pressure and temperature ranges in the Martian atmosphere mean non-thermal (or non-equilibrium) plasma can be used to produce oxygen efficiently.
Lead author Dr Vasco Guerra, from the University of Lisbon, said: "Sending a manned mission to Mars is one of the next major steps in our exploration of space. Creating a breathable environment, however, is a substantial challenge.
"Plasma reforming of CO2 on Earth is a growing field of research, prompted by the problems of climate change and production of solar fuels. Low temperature plasmas are one of the best media for CO2 decomposition – the split-up of the molecule into oxygen and carbon monoxide – both by direct electron impact, and by transferring electron energy into vibrational excitation."
Mars has excellent conditions for In-Situ Resource Utilisation (ISRU) by plasma. As well as its CO2 atmosphere, the cold surrounding atmosphere (on average about 210 Kelvin) may induce a stronger vibrational effect than that achievable on Earth. The low atmospheric temperature also works to slow the reaction, giving additional time for the separation of molecules.
Dr Guerra said: "The low temperature plasma decomposition method offers a twofold solution for a manned mission to Mars. Not only would it provide a stable, reliable supply of oxygen, but as source of fuel as well, as carbon monoxide has been proposed as to be used as a propellant mixture in rocket vehicles.
"This ISRU approach could help significantly simplify the logistics of a mission to Mars. It would allow for increased self-sufficiency, reduce the risks to the crew, and reduce costs by requiring fewer vehicles to carry out the mission."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Breakthrough in direct activation of CO2 and CH4 into liquid fuels and chemicals
More information: Vasco Guerra et al. The case for in situ resource utilisation for oxygen production on Mars by non-equilibrium plasmas, Plasma Sources Science and Technology (2017). DOI: 10.1088/1361-6595/aa8dcc 
Provided by: Institute of Physics


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-mission-ma...y.html#jCp



Scientists Discover Method to Turn CO2 Into Methane
A new catalyst can turn carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide into methane.




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By Avery Thompson
Jul 20, 2017 [/size]
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Carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is at an all-time high, and it's not enough for us to simply stop emitting more. In order to avoid the worst effects of climate change, we'll have to start taking lots of CO2 out of the atmosphere and store it someplace.
One group of scientists from Paris Diderot University believe they've found a way to do that, by inventing a catalyst that can turn CO2 into methane. Their new catalyst could be used either to create new fuels to burn—recycling the
 CO2 already in the air— (ArrowMARTIAN Alien2 ATMOSPHERE Arrow )or by turning the CO2 into a chemical that's easier to store.

More efficient separation of methane and CO2

October 18, 2017



[Image: separatingme.jpg]
Natural gas or biogas always needs to be purified before use. First, the methane molecules (in black and white) are separated from the CO2 molecules (in red and black) by means of membranes with tiny pores through which only the CO2 can pass. After the purification process, the methane can be used as fuel, for heating, or for the production of chemicals. Credit: KU Leuven - Verbeke
To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes, filters that stop the methane and allow the CO2 to pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.





Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-efficient-methane-co2.html#jCp
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Mars and beyond: Modular nuclear reactors set to power next wave of deep space exploration

David Szondy    December 3rd, 2017

[Image: kilopower-reactor-6.jpg?auto=format%2Cco...4bc013a181]
Artist's concept of four Kilopower reactors at a Mars base(Credit: NASA Glenn Research Center)

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The Kilopower prototype reactor(Credit: NASA Glenn Research Center)

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Moving the Kilopower prototype reactor(Credit: NASA Glenn Research Center)

NASA is planning to put astronauts on Mars one day and since the Red Planet is about as off the grid as you can get, the space agency is developing a new generation of modular nuclear reactors to power manned outposts. Under funding from the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD), the Kilopower project is a multi-year effort to build simple, inexpensive reactors that can be used for a wide variety of planetary and deep space missions.
One of the primary problems with almost any space mission is how to provide it with power. Depending on the goal of the mission and its duration, there are any number of options. The very first satellites used batteries that supplied them with electricity for a few days. Soon, solar panels were added that extended the mission life to years. Fuel cells provided manned missions with not only power, but drinking water as well as hydrogen mingled with oxygen to create electricity and a potable waste product.
Unfortunately, all of these options turned out to be very limited in application. The most successful of them, solar power, only works when sunlight of sufficient brightness shines on the panels. This means that it's a system largely confined to the inner Solar System with Jupiter as the extreme limit, doesn't provide much in the way or power density, is bulky, and is useless at night or on planetary surfaces that may be obscured by dust and clouds.

The most practical alternative to solar panels is nuclear power. It was first considered for spacecraft almost as soon as the first reactor came online 75 years ago, and has been used as a practical source since 1965 when the US SNAP-10 experimental reactor was launched into orbit.
The main nuclear power source used by US space missions is the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). A solid state device, an RTG uses the heat from plugs of plutonium 238 as either a way to keep electronics warm, or to generate electricity using thermocouples. It's a mechanically simple system that has been used for over 50 years for powering the Apollo mission lunar experiment packages, the Viking and Curiosity Mars landers, and the Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, Ulysses, and New Horizons deep space missions. It could also be used in Earth orbit, but, for political as well as engineering reasons, its use has been largely restricted to deep space missions.
Another problem with RTGs is that they don't produce much more than 300 Watts of electricity. This is fine for missions like Voyager where the emphasis is on longevity rather than brute power, but for planetary surface missions, RTGs can't handle anything much larger than the Curiosity rover. Worse, the plutonium 238 was a byproduct of Cold War weapon programs and is now in very short supply – it would require reopening long-closed production lines to create more.

If an RTG can be compared to an atomic battery, then a fission reactor is an industrial-scale gas turbine on steroids. Operating on the same principle as the civilian and military nuclear reactors, the space versions can produce enough power to act as a propulsion system with 30 percent greater thrust than the most advanced liquid fuel rockets. Needless to say, more modest reactors can provide power in any quantity needed. And the limiting factors? Cost, complexity, and safety.
The US only sent up the one reactor in 1965, which will remain in orbit for the next 4,000 years, but the Soviets sent up around 40 reactor-powered satellites during the Cold War to run high-powered radar systems for surveillance. The West has avoided using reactors due to having access to more advanced electronics, as well as the fear of political opposition.
The poor public image of space reactors wasn't helped when in 1978 the reactor-powered Soviet Cosmos 954 satellite made an uncontrolled re-entry and broke up over Canada, scattering radioactive debris along a 600 km (370 mi) line in the northern wilderness. This prompted Russian engineers to incorporate a mechanism to jettison the reactor core in future designs and send it into a safe orbit before the satellite made re-entry.

[Image: kilopower-reactor-1.jpg?auto=format%2Cco...be17e54342]

But now, as NASA missions in deep space become more ambitious, the agency's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, along with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada National Security Site and Los Alamos National Laboratory, has begun testing a new reactor design for Mars and beyond. Currently in the demonstrator stage, the Kilopower reactor is being checked against analytical models for hardware verification.
A reactor is very attractive to NASA because, like the RTG, it is compact, independent of any outside source of power, and can operate in extremely harsh environments. However, unlike the RTG, it puts out significant power per unit of weight.
"The reactor technology we are testing could be applicable to multiple NASA missions, and we ultimately hope that this is the first step for fission reactors to create a new paradigm of truly ambitious and inspiring space exploration," says David Poston, Los Alamos' chief reactor designer. "Simplicity is essential to any first-of-a-kind engineering project – not necessarily the simplest design, but finding the simplest path through design, development, fabrication, safety and testing."
Rated at 10 kilowatts, the Kilopower reactor puts out enough power to support two average American homes and can run continuously for ten years without refueling. Instead of plutonium, it uses a solid, cast uranium 235 reactor core 6 inches (15 cm) in diameter. This is surrounded by a beryllium oxide reflector with a mechanism at one end for removing and inserting a single rod of boron carbide. This rod starts and stops the reactor while the reflector catches escaping neutrons and bounces them back into the core, improving the efficiency of the self-regulating fission reaction. Until activated, the core is only mildly radioactive.

The heat from the reactor is collected and transferred using passive sodium heat pipes. These feed the heat to a set of high-efficiency Stirling engines. These are closed-loop engines that run on heat differences that cause a piston to move back and forth similar to the piston in an internal combustion engine, though with a compressible gas medium instead of an exploding mixture of petrol and air. This cools the reactor via a radiator umbrella as well as powering a dynamo to generate electricity.
The design is modular, so the self-contained reactor units can be hooked together to provide as much power as and where it's needed, whether it's a deep space probe or a Martian outpost. According to Lee Mason, STMD's principal technologist for Power and Energy Storage at NASA Headquarters, the technology is "agnostic" to its environment, allowing it a wide range of applications.
The Kilopower project is currently working toward a full-power test lasting about 28 hours. From there, NASA hopes to move to a test in space, but the Nevada tests are more of a breadboard test in a vacuum to show that the technology is feasible.
"What we are striving to do is give space missions an option beyond RTGs, which generally provide a couple hundred watts or so, says Mason says. "The big difference between all the great things we've done on Mars, and what we would need to do for a human mission to that planet, is power. This new technology could provide kilowatts and can eventually be evolved to provide hundreds of kilowatts, or even megawatts of power. We call it the Kilopower project because it gives us a near-term option to provide kilowatts for missions that previously were constrained to use less. But first things first, and our test program is the way to get started."
The video below describes the design of the Kilopower reactor.



Source: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacet...Red_Planet

This would work BETTER if they Landed the #2020CydoniaRover near Elon Musk's TARGETED Landing Zone just NORTH of Cydonia.  Well within range of driving from the early Musk Settlers and those who drive to investigate Cydonia.

Does NASA/JPL really want Elon Musk's Martian Pioneers to be the FIRST humans to set foot on Mars, but also the first to call the No Adult Supervision Available & sidekickers Just Poking Liars  - EA & New Astronomical Shenanigans Allover & Just Pulling Line -rhw007 the CROOKED LYING COWARDS THEY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN ???

Because Musk has the Balls and Ovaries in HIS payroll that Neanderthal Astrobiologists Suddenly Annihilated & Jointly Painting Lies NEVER EVER had after Viking.

#2020CydoniaRover

S    P    R   E   A     D            I    T           E      V     E     R     Y     W     H     E     R     E  


Bob... Ninja Split_spawn
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
Elon Musk Will Launch His Tesla Roadster to Mars

By Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor | December 5, 2017 04:18pm ET


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https://www.livescience.com/61088-elon-m...171206-lst

It really is Mars or bust for Elon Musk. The billionaire says he's going to launch his own Tesla Roadster on the first test flight of SpaceX's new giant rocket next month, and the car will play David Bowie's "Space Oddity" full blast on the way to Mars (if the rocket doesn't explode during liftoff).

In a pair of Twitter posts Friday night (Dec. 1), Musk said SpaceX's huge new rocket — called the Falcon Heavy — will make its debut in January from the very same NASA launch pad that sent the Apollo 11 astronauts to the moon: Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

"Falcon Heavy to launch next month from Apollo 11 pad at the Cape," Musk wrote. "Will have double thrust of next largest rocket. Guaranteed to be exciting, one way or another." [SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket in Images]

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A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket is shown atop Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida in this artist's concept. Elon Musk says the rocket will launch his own Tesla Roadster on its maiden flight in January 2018.
Credit: SpaceX

So that's great news, right?
Falcon Heavy will launch in January. Wait, it gets better.
"Payload will be my midnight cherry Tesla Roadster playing Space Oddity," Musk added in a follow-up tweet.
Okay, that's wild. But then there's this next thing.

"Destination is Mars orbit," Musk wrote. "Will be in deep space for a billion years or so if it doesn't blow up on ascent."
Whoa! That Roadster's going to rack up a lot of miles if it makes it to the Red Planet.

Elon Musk‏Verified account @elonmusk

Falcon Heavy to launch next month from Apollo 11 pad at the Cape. Will have double thrust of next largest rocket. Guaranteed to be exciting, one way or another.
9:17 PM - 1 Dec 2017


View image on Twitter
[Image: DO0GJp4X0AEqDBY.jpg:small]
Quote:
[url=https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.space.com%2F38968-elon-musk-falcon-heavy-rocket-tesla-roadster.html][Image: zDo-gAo0_normal.jpg] Elon Musk @elonmusk
0 to 100 km/h in 1.9 sec
1:23 AM - Nov 17, 2017
Twitter Ads info and privacy



Elon Musk @elonmusk
Payload will be my midnight cherry Tesla Roadster playing Space Oddity. Destination is Mars orbit. Will be in deep space for a billion years or so if it doesn’t blow up on ascent.
9:22 PM - Dec 1, 2017


 
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket is a heavy-lift launch vehicle that uses two Falcon 9 first stages around a central core, which is itself a modified Falcon 9. It stands 230 feet (70 meters) tall and is designed to launch payloads of up to 57 metric tons (that's 119,000 lbs.) — the equivalent of a Boeing 737 jetliner —  so a single Tesla Roadster should be a cakewalk for the monster rocket. The rocket is capable of carrying twice the payload of the massive Delta IV Heavy rocket built by the United Launch Alliance, and will be the most powerful American rocket since NASA's famed Saturn V moon rocket.

The Falcon Heavy is designed to be reusable, with its boosters flying back to Earth much like SpaceX's Falcon 9 first stages.

[video=veoh]https://www.livescience.com/61088-elon-musk-launch-tesla-to-mars.html?utm_source=lst-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20171206-lsthttp://[/video]

Musk has repeatedly stressed that there's a good chance the first Falcon Heavy rocket test could fail. Earlier this year, he said there was a "major pucker factor" for the first Falcon Heavy flight. The rocket is so complicated that a lot that could go wrong on its maiden launch, the SpaceX founder and CEO explained.

"I hope it makes it far enough away from the pad that it does not cause pad damage," Musk said in July at the International Space Station Research and Development conference. "I would consider even that a win, to be honest."



The first Falcon Heavy launch was expected to blast off this year, but SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell told SpaceNews that it could slip to early 2018, with a static engine test-firing expected sometime this month. SpaceX announced earlier this year that it planned to launch two paying passengers on a trip around the moon using a Falcon Heavy rocket and Dragon spacecraft by December 2018. 
Still, despite the potentially long odds. Musk does hope people will come see SpaceX's new rocket make its first flight.
"I encourage people to come down to the Cape to see the first Falcon Heavy mission," he said in July. "It's guaranteed to be exciting."
Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com


GO ELON !!!

#2020CydoniaRover

S    P    R   E   A     D            I    T           E      V     E     R     Y     W     H     E     R     E 


Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
Trump tells NASA to send Americans to Moon
December 11, 2017


[Image: 16-uspresidentd.jpg]
US President Donald Trump speaks during a signing ceremony for Space Policy Directive 1, with the aim of returning Americans to the Moon
US President Donald Trump directed NASA on Monday to send Americans to the Moon for the first time in decades, a move he said would help prepare for a future Mars trip.


"This time we will not only plant our flag and leave our footprint," Trump said at the White House as he signed the new space policy directive.
"We will establish a foundation for an eventual mission to Mars and perhaps someday to many worlds beyond."
The last time US astronauts visited the Moon was during the Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s.
On July 20, 1969, US astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the Moon.
Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, who heads the newly revitalized National Space Council, have previously vowed to explore the Moon again, but offered few details.
Flanked by Pence and two female astronauts, Trump said the directive "will refocus the space program on human exploration and discovery," and "marks an important step in returning American astronauts to the Moon for the first time since 1972."
The goal of the new Moon missions would include "long-term exploration and use" of its surface.
A White House statement said the US "will work with other nations and private industry to return astronauts to the Moon, developing the technology and means for manned exploration of Mars and other destinations in our solar system."
Sending people to the Red Planet has been a goal of the United States for years.
The first manned Mars mission is planned for sometime in the 2030s.


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-12-trump-nasa...n.html#jCp

[url=https://phys.org/news/2017-12-trump-nasa-americans-moon.html#jCp][/url]
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
...
Not impressed with the media pantomine on the moon and Mars mission.

I would like to see Trump say,

Quote:Drain the NASA swamp,
and drown,
NASA Underworld.



Better get to Mars before the Chinese do.
It is an impending Chinese infestation of solar system space.

If I were part of a competing alien technological species nearby,
perhaps an alien military Smoke contingency planner,
well,
biologic remediation is easier than costly warfare with spacecraft invasions, 
or a quarantine fleet,
keeping the infestation within the boundaries of it's own solar system.

... kind of an interplanetary ethnic cleansing campaign ...  Naughty

But it looks like most of the aliens could care less about the Chinese,
or the Humpty Trumpty horn blowing steam about Mars.

NASA funding needs to be directed to searching for nearby Earth like planets.

Yes .. we have one right next door ... called Mars.

But what we really want,
is
Unoccupied Earth Twin As Free Interplanetary Real Estate. 

No terraforming necessary,
just move right into the downtown New Miami Beach Nudist Colony.
Crocket and Tubbs,
are the New Miami Vice, 
and Casino Royale is heart beat away from the golf course.
Dorothy's New Kansas never has tornados,
and everybody has a chicken, and a salmon, and a prime rib in their pot.

Free Interplanetary Real Estate, 
prime planetary paradise living,
it's as easy as,
the propulsion Hi  technology to get there.

Better invest in exponentially advanced propulsion technology innovation,
that the Chinese won't figure out first.

...
Reply
The Gov't goes Martian lunatic rite after this Arrow Commercial... Breaking!



Holycowsmile Holy Falcon/Horus  R.C.H. Ritual Alignment Theory LilD

NASA won't need to collude with the Russians soon.

RE:News was as  Re-Use is
SpaceX Launches (and Lands) Used Rocket on Historic NASA Cargo Mission

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | December 15, 2017 11:12am ET

SpaceX launched and landed a used rocket today (Dec. 15), pulling off yet another spaceflight double play during a delivery mission for NASA that gets the company a big step closer to its goal of complete reusability.

SpaceX's two-stage Falcon 9 rocket lifted off today at 10:36 a.m. EST (1536 GMT) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, sending the company's robotic Dragon capsule on a resupply run to the International Space Station (ISS) that just might include some Christmas presents for the station’s crew.

Both the rocket and its payload have previous spaceflight experience: This Dragon visited the orbiting lab back in April 2015, and the Falcon 9 first stage launched a different Dragon toward the ISS in June 2017. Never before had SpaceX launched a pre-flown spacecraft atop a pre-flown rocket — and never before had the company employed a used rocket on a cargo mission for NASA. [See more photos of SpaceX's Falcon 9/Dragon launch for NASA here!
[Image: MTUxMzM3MzEyMg==]

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo ship lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Dec. 15, 2017 to deliver NASA cargo to the International Space Station. Both the rocket and Dragon have flown in space before.
Credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Sandra Joseph
The agency approved the use of a pre-flown booster after conducting an extensive review of the risks involved, NASA officials said.
"We're very comfortable that the risk posture on this vehicle is not significantly greater than [on] a new booster," Kirk Shireman, NASA's ISS program manager, said in a prelaunch briefing Monday (Dec. 11). "We think of it as equivalent risk."

Less than 10 minutes after liftoff today, the Falcon 9 first stage came back for another pinpoint touchdown — the second of its operational life — at Landing Zone 1, a SpaceX facility at Cape Canaveral. SpaceX has now pulled off 20 first-stage landings during orbital flights and re-flown landed boosters on four separate occasions.
Such activities are part of SpaceX's effort to develop fully and rapidly reusable spaceflight systems, a key priority of the company and its billionaire founder and CEO, Elon Musk.
[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...EzMzUzOTk2][Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...MzNTM5OTY=]

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket first-stage booster approaches Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida after launching a Dragon cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station for NASA on Dec. 15, 2017. It marked the second launch for Falcon 9 booster and Dragon spacecraft.
Credit: NASA TV
"In the long run, reusability is going to significantly reduce the cost of access to space, and that's what's going to be required to send future generations to explore the universe," SpaceX's Dragon mission manager Jessica Jensen said during Monday's briefing. [Reusable Rocket Systems: How They Work (Infographic)]
"We want to be able to send thousands of people into space, not just tens," Jensen added. "Reusability is a very key part of that, and we're excited, because tomorrow is just one step closer to that." (The Falcon 9 was originally scheduled to launch Tuesday, Dec. 12, but SpaceX delayed it by a day to have more time for ground-systems checks, and then again by two additional days to conduct further inspection and cleaning after particles were discovered in the rocket's second-stage fuel system.)
As the Falcon 9's first stage was landing today, the rocket's (expendable) second stage kept powering the Dragon to orbit. If everything goes according to plan, the capsule will get to the ISS on Sunday (Dec. 17), delivering about 4,800 lbs. (2,180 kilograms) of scientific hardware and other supplies to the orbiting lab.
The science gear aboard the Dragon is a diverse and interesting lot. For example, there's a sensor designed to measure just how much solar energy hits Earth, and another one that aims to gauge the amount of space junk whizzing around the planet in the ISS' orbit.
[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...EzMzU0MTEy][Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...MzNTQxMTI=]

SpaceX's Dragon cargo ship filled with NASA supplies separates from its Falcon 9 rocket upper stage after a successful launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Dec. 15, 2017. It is the Dragon's second delivery trip to the International Space Station.
Credit: NASA TV
Another experiment seeks to determine the least amount of gravitational pull that plants can detect. The results could help settlers grow crops on the moon and Mars, project leaders have said.
Also aboard the Dragon is a roughly microwave-size machine built by California-based startup Made In Space that will make exotic ZBLAN optical fiber aboard the ISS. ZBLAN has the potential to be much higher-performance than standard silica optical fiber, company representatives have said. But it's tough to make usable ZBLAN fiber here on Earth because our planet's gravitational pull induces crystal impurities in the stuff, they added.
Made In Space hopes to sell large amounts of space-produced ZBLAN fiber on Earth. The newly launched machine will help the company determine just how realistic that goal is, Made In Space representatives said.

"This'll be the first time that we've leveraged the space environment to manufacture a product in space that, because it was manufactured there, it's got these amazing properties that are actually useful and commercially viable — we hope — down on the ground," Made In Space CEO Andrew Rush said in a different pre-launch briefing Monday.
The folks who packed Dragon may have squeezed a few stocking stuffers for the ISS crewmembers in as well.  
"I cannot confirm nor deny the presence of Christmas presents," Shireman said. "There are crew care packages, and as program manager I don't have to go inspect all those. So it wouldn't surprise me, but I can't say for certain."
The Falcon 9 lifted off today from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral. This was the first launch in more than a year from Pad 40, which was damaged by a Falcon 9 explosion during a routine preflight test on Sept. 1, 2016.

https://www.space.com/39063-spacex-launc...-nasa.html
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Elon Musk Unveils Falcon Heavy Rocket Photos Ahead of Maiden Flight
By Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor | December 20, 2017 10:18am ET

SpaceX founder Elon Musk unveiled a tantalizing first glimpse at his company's new megarocket — the Falcon Heavy — which is expected to launch on its maiden flight next month. 
In an early morning Twitter post, Musk revealed several views of the new rocket under assembly inside SpaceX's hangar at Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The images show stunning views of the Falcon Heavy from above and one imposing shot of the rocket's 27 first-stage engines, nine on each of its three main boosters. [SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket in Images
"Falcon Heavy at the Cape," Musk wrote in the Twitter post.

[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...EzNzgwNzM1][Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...M3ODA3MzU=]

SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket, a massive heavy-lift launch vehicle, is seen during assembly ahead of its first test flight from Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket's first flight is expected in January 2018.
Credit: SpaceX/Elon Musk
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy is a heavy-lift launch vehicle powered by two first-stage boosters from the company's Falcon 9 rockets and a central core booster that itself is a modified Falcon 9. The rocket will stand 230 feet (70 meters) tall when complete and is designed to launch payloads of up to 119,000 lbs. (57 metric tons) into space.
[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...M3ODMwNzI=][Image: MTUxMzc4MzA3Mg==]

The 27 engines of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket are front and center during assembly in this photo tweeted by Elon Musk on Dec. 20, 2017.
Credit: SpaceX/Elon Musk
The Falcon Heavy is the most powerful U.S. rocket since NASA's Saturn V moon rocket and is capable of launching twice as much payload as the current record-holder, the Delta IV Heavy built by United Launch Alliance. SpaceX's rocket is also designed to be reusable, with the three core boosters built to fly back to Earth and land like SpaceX's current Falcon 9 rockets. The company test-fired the Falcon Heavy's core stage for the first time earlier this year, in May.

Musk has said that Falcon Heavy's first payload will be his own midnight-cherry-red Tesla Roadster, launched on a trajectory aimed for Mars orbit. However, Musk has said that there's a fair chance the rocket could fail on its debut test flight. The Falcon Heavy is expected to perform its first static-fire test on Pad 39A by the end of 2017, SpaceX representatives have said. 
SpaceX also plans to use a Falcon Heavy and Dragon space capsule to launch two passengers around the moon by the end of 2018.

The battle of the space billionaires heats up as Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin reveals it is aiming for a manned launch in 2018
  • Blue Origin successfully flew its space tourism passenger capsule for the first time last week
  • Richard Branson has claimed he will go on a trip to space with Virgin Galactic within the next six months
  • Elon Musk's SpaceX hopes to send its first astronauts to the International Space Station next year
By Mark Prigg For Dailymail.com [/url]
Published: 00:15 GMT, 21 December 2017 | Updated: 01:28 GMT, 21 December 2017


The battle of the billionaires between Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Richard Branson looks set to finally blast its first passengers into space next year.
Speaking at the Next-Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference in Colorado, Jeff Ashby, a former NASA astronaut who is director of safety and mission assurance for Jeff Bezos' space firm Blue Origin, said the firm is now 'a year out' from human flights.
It comes as Richard Branson claimed in October he will travel to space on his Virgin Galactic craft within six months.
Elon Musk is also expected to soon reveal the launch schedule for a manned version of his Dragon capsule that will ferry astronauts to the International Space station under a NASA contract next year.
Scroll down for video 
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The billionaire space race: Jeff Bezos (left) space firm Blue Origin, is now 'a year out' from human flights, while Richard Branson (center) says he hopes to fly aboard Virgin galactic 'within six months'. Elon Musk's SpaceX (right)hopes to send its first astronauts to the International Space Station under a lucrative NASA contract next year.
Blue Origin's test site in West Texas saw the most recent launch last week, when 'Version 2.0' of its crew capsule, outfitted with the large windows that are a distinctive feature of the spacecraft, took off.
The capsule carried 12 experiments as well as a test dummy, dubbed 'Mannequin Skywalker,' to measure the environment a human would experience on those flights.
The test flight was the first performed under a launch license awarded by the Federal Aviation Administration in August. 
'You have to be licensed in order to collect revenue,' Ashby told the Next-Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference, according
to SpaceNews.

'So last week was the start of a revolution. It was our first revenue flight for payloads: a huge, historic moment for us.'  
'We're probably a year and a half, two years out from when we're actually able to fly tended payloads,' Ashby said, which will see astronauts working with experiments on missions.


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Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5200365/The-battle-space-billionaires-heats-up.html#ixzz51rVbCS53
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Air Force Maintains Trust in SpaceX After Secret Zuma Mission: Report


By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | January 23, 2018 11:29am ET

[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...NoLmpwZw==]
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches the Zuma mission for an unspecified U.S. government agency on Jan. 7, 2018, from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The mysterious payload, built my Northrop Grumman, apparently never reached orbit, according to media reports.
Credit: SpaceX

The U.S. Air Force has given SpaceX a qualified vote of confidence in the wake of the presumed loss of the mysterious Zuma satellite, according to Bloomberg News.

The news bolsters SpaceX's claim that its Falcon 9 rocket performed just fine during the Jan. 7 launch of Zuma, which apparently never reached orbit, according to unconfirmed reports.

"Based on the data available, our team did not identify any information that would change SpaceX's Falcon 9 certification status," Lt. Gen. John Thompson, commander of the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center, told Bloomberg News in a statement. [See amazing photos of SpaceX's Zuma launch]

This assessment came after "a preliminary review of telemetry that was available to us from” the Zuma liftoff, Thompson told Bloomberg News, stressing that "the Air Force will continue to evaluate data from all launches."

The Zuma payload was built by aerospace company Northrop Grumman, which also provided the adapter that connected Zuma to the Falcon 9's second stage. Thompson's statement will therefore likely focus more attention on Northrop Grumman, which has so far declined to comment on the mission, citing its classified nature.

The secrecy surrounding Zuma is extreme. Pretty much all we know is that Northrop Grumman built it for the U.S. government (which agency was in charge is unclear) and that the payload was headed to low Earth orbit.

Nobody has even confirmed that Zuma failed to reach orbit as planned, though the scuttlebutt in the spaceflight community posits that the satellite failed to separate from the Falcon 9's second stage and, as a result, ended up plummeting to Earth along with the launch gear. (The Falcon 9's reusable first stage, meanwhile, made a pinpoint landing at Landing Zone 1, a SpaceX facility at Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex 40.)

SpaceX has stressed that any blame for the Zuma failure — if indeed the mission failed — falls on someone else's shoulders.

"For clarity: After review of all data to date, Falcon 9 did everything correctly on Sunday night," SpaceX President and Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Shotwell said in a statement on Jan. 9.

"If we or others find otherwise based on further review, we will report it immediately," Shotwell added. "Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false. Due to the classified nature of the payload, no further comment is possible."

Zuma was SpaceX's third national-security mission for the U.S. government. The California-based company also launched the NROL-76 satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office in May 2017 and the Air Force's robotic X-37B space plane in September of that year. Both of those liftoffs were successful.

You can read Bloomberg News' full story here:
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-01-22/spacex-keeps-u-s-air-force-s-confidence-after-satellite-s-loss


Source: https://www.space.com/39464-air-force-sp...ssion.html


AS I stated before and to President Trump through letters not just tweets; Space-X is doing what NASA/JPL lack the engineering, balls, and vision and passion to do within 10 years and be way ahead of NASA using other contractors.

#2020CydoniaRover
SPREAD IT EVERYWHERE !!!

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[Image: photo.jpg]
SpaceX
 
Published on Jan 24, 2018


On Wednesday, Jan. 24th, 2018 SpaceX completed the first static fire test of the Falcon Heavy launch vehicle. When Falcon Heavy lifts off, it will be the most powerful operational rocket in the world by a factor of two. Its first stage is composed of three Falcon 9 nine-engine cores whose 27 Merlin engines together generate more than 5 million pounds of thrust, equal to approximately eighteen 747 aircraft. Only the Saturn V moon rocket, last flown in 1973, delivered more payload to orbit. Falcon Heavy was designed from the outset to carry humans into space and restores the possibility of flying missions with crew to the Moon or Mars. 




Falcon Heavy Maiden Flight soon! LilD
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How NASA Plans to Send Humans Back to the Moon

The U.S. space agency is rigorously testing its Orion spacecraft in hopes of launching its first mission to the moon as early as 2019.
By Ramin Skibba
PUBLISHED January 26, 2018

NASA has been subjecting its Orion space capsule to a battery of tests designed to tell whether the spacecraft is ready to ferry humans into orbit and beyond. So far, the capsule seems to be on track—in a series of maneuvers this week, a joint team of NASA and U.S. Navy specialists successfully recovered the spaceship from the sea off the coast of San Diego, simulating what would happen when a deep-space mission splashed back to Earth.
If all goes to plan, Orion will become NASA’s flagship technology for launching astronauts to orbit and even to deep space, including to the lunar surface and maybe Mars. Here’s what’s at stake with Orion, and what still needs to be done before it can blast off.
Wait, aren’t U.S. astronauts already getting into space?
Yes, but not on NASA spacecraft. The space shuttle program ended in 2011, and the remaining shuttles are now on display in museums around the country. Since then, American astronauts have had to hitch rides to the International Space Station on Russian rockets, and NASA has sent supplies to the ISS via SpaceX and Orbital ATK launches.
Until Orion becomes available, NASA astronauts have no other way to get to low-Earth orbit and beyond. Commercial space companies like SpaceX and Boeing are developing their own crew capsules capable of reaching the ISS. But when it comes to sending people to the moon or deeper into space, it's not clear yet who will be first to the launch pad.

Story Cont'd... : Arrow

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018...e-science/
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I'll put this here first then on my NEW Facebook Page because it's its coming from Space.com:

SpaceX Confirms Its First Falcon Heavy Rocket Will Attempt a Triple Landing


By Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor | February 5, 2018 08:28am ET

[Video]

When SpaceX launches its first Falcon Heavy rocket this week, the company is going to attempt something never done before: a rocket-landing triple play.

SpaceX representatives confirmed over the weekend that the Falcon Heavy test flight on Tuesday (Feb. 6) will also include landings for its three first-stage core boosters, which are based on the company's Falcon 9 rocket. Liftoff is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. EST (1830 GMT) from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  You can watch the liftoff live here at Space.com, courtesy of SpaceX, or directly via SpaceX.

"Following booster separation, Falcon Heavy's two side cores will return to land at SpaceX's Landing Zones 1 and 2 (LZ-1 & LZ-2) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida," SpaceX representatives said in a statement Saturday (Feb. 3). "Falcon Heavy’s center core will attempt to land on the "Of Course I Still Love You" droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean." [In Photos: SpaceX's 1st Falcon Heavy Rocket at the Pad]


SpaceX has landed Falcon 9 rockets 21 times on land or its robotic drone ships, and has reflown boosters six times, as part of the company's reusable-rocket program. The heavy-lift Falcon Heavy rocket is part of that program, with its three first-stage cores equipped with landing legs and grid-like fins to control their re-entry through Earth's atmosphere.

[Image: aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kv...E3MTc1MDMz]
SpaceX's first Falcon Heavy rocket stands atop Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket's debut launch is scheduled for Feb. 6, 2018.
Credit: SpaceX

Residents of central Florida may actually hear the Falcon Heavy boosters during their landing attempt, SpaceX representatives noted.

"There is the possibility that residents of Brevard, Indian River, Orange, Osceola, Seminole, and Volusia counties may hear one or more sonic booms during the landing attempts," SpaceX representatives said. "Residents of Brevard County are most likely to hear one or more sonic booms, although what residents' experience will depend on weather conditions and other factors."

Florida's Space Coast Office of Tourism estimates that up to 100,000 spectators are visiting the area to watch the Falcon Heavy launch, according to a Florida Today report.


SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket is billed as the most powerful rocket since NASA's Saturn V moon rocket and can launch payloads of up to 141,000 lbs. (64 metric tons) into space. The rocket can carry twice as much payload as its nearest competitor, United Launch Alliance's Delta IV Heavy booster.

For this first flight, the Falcon Heavy will launch SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's own Tesla Roadster. If all goes well, the midnight-cherry-red electric car will launch on a trajectory that will send it near Mars, Musk has said.


Musk's Roadster looks like it even has a passenger: an apparent mannequin called Starman, which sits in the driver's seat. Musk posted photos of the mannequin on Instagram today (Feb. 5), and we can only assume it will ride along with the Roadster's epic trip.
Musk has said repeatedly that there is a fair chance that this maiden flight of the Falcon Heavy could fail.

"There's a lot that could go wrong there," he said last year. "I encourage people to come down to the Cape to see the first Falcon Heavy mission; it's guaranteed to be exciting."


Visit Space.com for complete coverage of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy test flight this week.

Editor's note: This story has been updated to reflect the correct lift capacity of the Falcon Heavy. It is 141,000 lbs (64 metric tons), not 119,000 lbs. (54 metric tons).

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.

==
He's going to try and LAND at Cydonia Latitude, but about 220-230 Longitude.  Good place to build a city and NOT destroy the relics that lie beneath the dusty Dunes of Cydonia.

Launch tomorrow 1:30 PM Eastern Time   Worship Clap Popcorn Woohoo Par-ty

GO ELON !!!!

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He's on his way to Mars Orbit !!!

Holycowsmile Worship Woohoo Dance016 Guitar Greet012 Smilies-21813 Par-ty



Bob... Ninja Assimilated
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I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
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It seemed flawless and the double-landing of the boosters was surreal!
I still haven't heard of the Third core landing on the drone-ship yet.

It likely landed just fine.
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