Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Curse of Oak Island. New Finds of Old?
#1



What have they uncovered???

[Image: 600x600bb-85.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#2
...
I got an error on the video -- no show --

what have they uncovered?
...
Reply
#3
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#4
...
They didn't find Tp  anything.
I knew a miner once that was trying to find investors to dig up the Lost Dutchman gold mine.
He had a good story and a tale of glory to foretell.
All you needed was about 250,000$ and he would start digging.


Naughty

I think those guys on that video are all clowns looking for a glory hole.
I think the English found the treasure centuries ago, and it is long gone.
...
Reply
#5
I watched a few episodes of this show.  However, it soon became apparent to me that it seemed to be a combination of a reality show and a soap opera, a never-ending drama.  I moved on . . .
e4e5Qh5Ke7Qe5#
Reply
#6
Slid Arrow Moving Rite Along...
[Image: 501st-404-error-page.jpg]
“Great oaks from little acorns grow” is a proverb of ancient Roman origin
Over the past four years, tree historians have discovered 1,200 previously unknown but still surviving mediaeval and Tudor oaks, pushing the grand total for such trees in England to a remarkable 3,400.


About 85 per cent of them are between 400 and 600 years old, while some 12 per cent date back 600 to 800 years, with ~3.33 per cent (117 examples) dating back 800 to 1,000 years.
Quote:The OAKS of 'oak island'   were cultivated by peoples many years ago???

Puzzle of the Live-Oaks

  Illusion of the Spanish Main and the age when piracy was in flower comes from the presence of half a dozen live-oak trees.  You'd swear they were palms on the sand spit.  They are without branches or foliage low down and their spreading tops have a palm tree look.

  These oaks are a part of the island mystery.  Where did they come from?  How did they grow here? 

These live-oaks, it is said, are southern trees, found not north of Texas and Louisiana.  Yet here they are on Oak Island.  None was ever found on any of the other 364 islands of Mahone Bay which are, in many cases, crested with the trees of the region, including many northern conifers.

"...there is a legend that when that when the last live-oak dies, the island will yield the secret of its treasure..."
   Fifty years ago, old Chester people remember, there was a regular little grove of these live-oaks on the spit at Smith's Cove.  Most of them have died.  Now a mere half dozen hoary and moribund old-timers remain with a kind of struggling majesty.  I would like to say that there is a legend that when that when the last live-oak dies, the island will yield the secret of its treasure, but I heard of no such legend.  It seems a pity.

Are the Oak Trees a Signal Anomaly for sea-farers approaching North America to Identify this Island? 

Ancient peoples shaped the Amazon rainforest

Thu, Mar 02, 2017

FIELD MUSEUM—We often think of the Amazon rainforest as a vast expanse of nature untouched by humans. But a new study in Science suggests that's not true—in fact, today's rainforest is shaped by trees that were cultivated by indigenous peoples thousands of years ago.


"Some of the tree species that are abundant in Amazonian forests today, like cacao, açaí, and Brazil nut, are probably common because they were planted by people who lived there long before the arrival of European colonists," says Nigel Pitman, the Mellon Senior Conservation Ecologist at Chicago's Field Museum and a co-author of the study.
The team made the discovery by overlaying data from more than 1,000 forest surveys on a map of more than 3,000 archaeological sites across the Amazon. By comparing forest composition at varying distances from archaeological sites, the analysis generated the first Amazon-wide picture of how pre-Columbian peoples influenced Amazonian biodiversity. The study focused on 85 tree species known to have been domesticated by Amazonian peoples for food, shelter, or other uses over the last several thousand years. The researchers found that throughout the Amazon basin, these species were five times more likely to be common in mature upland forests than non-domesticated species. In some parts of the basin, domesticated species were found to be both more common and more diverse in forests closer to archaeological sites.
"That's even the case for some really remote, mature forests that we'd typically assumed to be pristine and undisturbed," says Pitman.
The finding promises to heat up a long-simmering debate among scientists about how thousands of years of human settlement in the Amazon basin have influenced modern-day patterns of Amazonian biodiversity. The immense size of Amazonian forests has historically hampered archaeological research and given the impression of an untouched landscape, but a large number of new archaeological sites have been discovered in recent years.
The team, made up by hundreds of ecologists and social scientists worldwide, was led by Carolina Levis, a PhD student at Brazil's National Institute for Amazonian Research and Wagenigen University and Research in the Netherlands. "For many years, ecological studies ignored the influence of pre-Columbian peoples on the forests we see today. We found that a quarter of these domesticated tree species are widely distributed in the basin and dominate large expanses of forest. These species are vital for the livelihood and economy of Amazonian peoples and indicate that the Amazonian flora is in part a surviving heritage of its former inhabitants," says Levis.
_______________________________________
[Image: 33151870575_6600279973.jpg]
 Carolina Levis in a forest dominated by domesticated species (Bertholletia excelsa and Euterpe precatoria) very close to an archaeological site. Credit: Bernardo Flores
________________________________________________________
[Image: 32306394744_0e708db31b.jpg]
 Fruits of peach palm (Bactris gasipaes), an Amazonian domesticated species. Credit: Diogo Lagroteria
______________________________________________ 
[Image: 33151877505_e7a0327726.jpg]
 Hatahara Site with Manacapuru phase urns and anthropogenic dark soils, ca 600 AD. Credit: Val Moraes- Central Amazon Project
___________________________________________________________ 
The study also pinpointed regions of the Amazon that today concentrate especially high diversities and large populations of domesticated species. Southwestern Amazonia, where large stands of Brazil nut trees remain a foundation of local residents' livelihoods, is one such example. Other regions showed fewer domesticated species, or a weaker relationship between domesticated species and archeological sites, highlighting the need for more research on the history of Amazonian settlement. The degree to which the recent history of Amazonian settlement has affected the distribution and abundance of domesticated species in the Amazon also remains to be studied.
While the small number of domesticated species used in the study was sufficient to reveal a strong human signal in modern forests, the authors point out that the signal may be even stronger than they documented, since hundreds of other Amazonian tree species were used by pre-Colombian peoples and also deserve study. Untangling the complex interplay of historical, environmental, and ecological factors structuring the 16,000-species Amazonian tree flora remains a focus of the team's work.
"The questions are pressing," says Pitman, "since both types of pre-Columbian heritage--archeological sites and the forests that surround them--are at risk from road-building, mining, and other threats to the Amazon."
Article Source: A Field Museum news release.

Hundreds of previously undiscovered ancient oak trees found in English countryside

Exclusive: Scientists discover England has more ancient oak trees than rest of Europe put together
[Image: oak-tree-1.jpg]
This 850-year-old ancient oak at King’s Walden is among 117 examples dating back 800 to 1,000 years Aljos Farjon

The mighty oak has been central to English history and culture for centuries. Now new research is revealing precisely why.

A nationwide survey has just revealed that England has more ancient oak trees than the rest of Europe put together.

Over the past four years, tree historians have discovered 1,200 previously unknown but still surviving mediaeval and Tudor oaks, pushing the grand total for such trees in England to a remarkable 3,400.

About 85 per cent of them are between 400 and 600 years old, while some 12 per cent date back 600 to 800 years, with 3.4 per cent (117 examples) dating back 800 to 1,000 years. The survey work has been coordinated by the Woodland Trust, working in conjunction with the Ancient Tree Forum, the Tree Register and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

By contrast, the figure for the whole of continental Europe is estimated to be just 2,000 ancient oaks – 1,260 of which are in Sweden, only some 120 in Germany and perhaps 300 in Romania.
In terms of 800- to 1,000-year-old oaks, continental Europe has only 85 – 14 of which are in Sweden and 24 in Germany.

As well as increasing England’s ancient oak inventory by more than 50 per cent, the new research also helps to explain why the oak has consistently been more central to English culture than it has been to many continental European ones.

Oaks are strongly represented in so many aspects of English history. It is the national tree of England and one of the most popular symbols of royalty in Britain – with, for instance, more than 500 pubs called the Royal Oak.

Oak trees, along with acorns and oak leaves, are also particularly common in English heraldry – and adorn countless English aristocratic coats of arms. The oak-built ships of the pre-mid-19th century Royal Navy were often known collectively as the Wooden Walls of Old England – and the official senior service march is still the 18th century anthem, “Heart of Oak”. Indeed over the centuries, eight Royal Navy warships have borne the name Royal Oak – and the tree has been associated with historical characters ranging from Robin Hood to Charles II.

But why have so many more ancient oaks survived in England than have on the continent?

Recently completed research, by Dr Aljos Farjon of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, suggests that England’s ancient oak heritage is a consequence of the country’s unique political and cultural history.

England is the only major country in Europe to have been taken over, lock, stock and barrel, by a rival geopolitical entity – namely the Duchy of Normandy in 1066. “The Norman conquest not only changed the political structure and direction of England, but also initiated a total change in how much of the English countryside evolved,” said Dr Farjon, author of a ground-breaking new book on England’s oak heritage, Ancient Oaks in the English Landscape, due to be published later this Spring.
William the Conqueror’s victory meant that all land in England belonged to the new king by right of conquest. It gave birth to a thoroughgoing feudal system in which the King gave land to dozens of tenants-in-chief (his barons). They, in turn, gave the right to exploit those lands (and their populations) to sub-tenants (the more minor nobles). Among the lands which the King kept for his own exclusive use were the major forests – which he used for hunting. With the Royal Forests open for the hunt to only a privileged few, and to create their own hunting parks, the aristocracy imported southern Italian fallow deer to populate them (a strategy which was easier to achieve because the Normans also ruled southern Italy).

Indeed, within 140 years of the Norman conquest of England, the number of deer parks had gone up almost 60-fold (from 35 to at least 2,000) – and it is in those Norman-origin former hunting parks that about 50 per cent of England’s ancient oaks can be found today. Hunting in thousands of relatively small hunting parks required two things – relatively open woodland (to allow hunters to actually see the deer they were hunting) and lots of deer. To a large extent, the sheer number of tree shoot-grazing deer helped prevent the woodland becoming too dense, which in turn favoured oak growth rather than the growth of rival beeches and limes.

Oaks are more slow-growing than those latter two species – and as a result can easily become overtopped (and therefore deprived of sunlight and thus killed) by them in dense forest environments. By contrast, deer parks, consisting of more open woodland, were ideal habitats for oaks to become truly ancient in – and that is what, courtesy of William the Conqueror and his nobles, seems to have happened in England.The Royal Forests and Chases contributed to the preservation of the ancient oaks in a similar way.

Partly because England’s oaks were able to grow particularly old in so many deer parks, the distribution of ancient oaks around the country is very uneven. About 55 per cent of England’s ancient oaks are to be found in just ten counties – Oxfordshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Gloucestershire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Herefordshire is the top county, with 366 oaks older than 400 years.

The greatest single concentration is in part of the Blenheim Palace estate in Oxfordshire. In that one former deer park alone, Dr Farjon has found, over the past four years, 112 ancient oaks which started growing before the year 1600 – and elsewhere in the country he has succeeded in discovering a further 400 of similar vintage. It’s the largest number of ancient oaks ever discovered by one individual in British botanical history.

The oldest oaks in Britain – each about 900 to 1,000 years old – are located in Merton (Cheshire), Lydham Manor (Shropshire) and Bowthorpe (Lincolnshire). These are all approximately 13 metres (43 feet) in circumference.

It’s thought that, up until the establishment of the Forestry Commission in 1919, there had been thousands more ancient oaks in England. Tragically, many of them were felled – often in former Royal Forests – to make way for commercial forestry, particularly in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. In Europe commercial forestry had started two centuries earlier – and therefore contributed much to the relatively greater paucity of ancient oaks on the continent.
“Great oaks from little acorns grow” is a proverb of ancient Roman origin – but the new survey shows that, partly courtesy of Italian deer, it is England that now has the greatest abundance of truly ancient oaks in Europe.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/scienc...10246.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#7
The Oaks were an anomaly in Mahone Bay.

In the last Episode of the season they brought up Oak.(Original Money Pit wood and hand hewn).

Now obviously any shafts and rock-cut Chambers would also be hand hewn.

An example of such...

The secret world of the Knights Templar revealed: 

Caverns used by the shadowy warrior monks 700 years ago are just a few feet inside a rabbit hole 
By James Dunn For Mailonline
PUBLISHED: 13:17 GMT, 7 March 2017 UPDATED: 21:16 GMT, 7 March 2017

Once used as a ceremonial spot for the followers of a secretive religious sect, these are the underground caves offering safe haven after leaders of the free world brutally dismantled the group's power base.

The caves in Shropshire were once a place of pilgrimage and worship for followers of the Knights Templar, a feared fighting force during the Crusades who built an international power base on their reputation and spoils.

The untouched caverns date back to a time when the Knights were prominent before King Philip IV of France, fearful of their power and deeply in their debt, attempted to dismantle the renowned group.

Many were tortured into confessions and burnt at the stake in order to publicly discredit them, but after they were literally forced underground, caves such as those in Shropshire offered haven to members and followers.

The Caynton Caves lay untouched for years and it is still not known exactly when they were carved. Some believe it was by their knights 700 years ago while some think it was by their followers in the 17th century.

In recent times they have been used by numerous groups including druids and pagans wishing to find a safe place to worship, as the Templar's followers had used it for centuries ago.

Although they were closed up five years ago after the landowners became sick of the constant requests and found the caves strewn with litter and new carvings, adding to the crosses etched in the walls from long ago.

Photographer Michael Scott, from Birmingham, 33, captured the eerie pictures of the inside for the first time since it was shut in 2012. He said: 'I traipsed over a field to find it, but if you didn't know it was there you would just walk right past it. It's probably less than a metre underground, so it's more into the field than under it.

'Considering how long it's been there it's in amazing condition, it's like an underground temple.'


Down the rabbit hole! Gorgeous caves hidden under farmer's field


[Image: 3E08BF3B00000578-0-image-a-26_1488891046537.jpg]

+15

Shadowy: Once used as a ceremonial spot for the followers of a secretive religious sect, these are the underground caves offering safe haven after leaders of the free world brutally dismantled the group's power base


[Image: 3E08C1DB00000578-0-image-a-38_1488891105336.jpg]

+15

Historic: The caves in Shropshire were once a place of pilgrimage and worship for followers of the Knights Templar, a feared fighting force during the Crusades who built an international power base on their reputation and spoils



Enlightened: Sunlight rushes in through the small openings in the caves, just metres under the surface of the ground in Shropshire, once used by followers of the Knights Templar (right, stock image) that made its name in the Crusades


[Image: 3E08C1D000000578-0-image-a-32_1488891059420.jpg]15
Forced underground: The untouched caverns date back to a time when the Knights were prominent before King Philip IV of France, fearful of their power and deeply in their debt, attempted to dismantle the renowned group


[Image: 3E08BDEF00000578-0-image-a-42_1488891130440.jpg]15
Scratching the surface: The entrances to the caves look barely bigger than rabbit holes when seen from the ground above but below is an intricate underground cavern


[Image: 3E08BDFF00000578-0-image-a-29_1488891051024.jpg]5
Born again: In recent times they have been used by numerous groups including druids and pagans wishing to find a safe place to worship, as the Templar's followers had used it for centuries ago


[Image: 3E08C1A700000578-0-image-m-47_1488891151980.jpg]
[Image: 3E08C15700000578-0-image-a-48_1488891157383.jpg]
Casting a shadow: The caves were closed up five years ago after the landowners became sick of the constant requests and found the caves strewn with litter and new carvings, adding to the crosses etched in the walls from years gone by


[Image: 3E08BF4300000578-0-image-a-28_1488891048699.jpg]

+15

Light it up: Photographer Michael Scott, from Birmingham, set out in search of the historical wonder after seeing a video of it online and captured the eerie pictures of the inside for the first time since it was shut in 2012

[Image: 3E08C16200000578-0-image-a-50_1488891163117.jpg]

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4289774/Secret-underground-world-Knights-Templar-Shropshire.html#ixzz4aqe5608E 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
[url=http://ec.tynt.com/b/rf?id=bBOTTqvd0r3Pooab7jrHcU&u=DailyMail][/url]




The island is ~3km long and over a kilometer wide...
[Image: oak_island_hevzzm.jpg]
Thatza lotta ~Templar? rabbit holes.

They need Lidar.

[Image: _77767713_map-976.jpg]

To see through all the Trees...

[Image: Daukantas-img4.jpg]

OAK ISLAND NEEDS LIDAR!!!
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#8
[Image: 3E08C1C400000578-0-Enlightened_Sunlight_...377207.jpg]

This rabbit hole made me recall sum-thing.

Big Digs and Tunnels and Artificial bodies of Water in an area vested in capital power and its ongoing functioning in future or crisis.
[Image: b9c3ea93043be8872724249c67bf080b.jpg]
My next post is a true tale and not a local myth of the underground...

and how similar events may have transpired on Oak Island. 

Oh yeah...Keith there's coppersmithy in on the act.






Quote:My Mom worked At the Ministry of Health over 30 years ago and had told of Tunnels that went underneath Wascana Lake From her Building to The Ledgislative Building.

Years After my Father passed she Re-married A man who had worked at the Ledgislature.

While on vacation last summer we were driving through the mountains... going to visit my Bro and his wife.


It was a Five Hour Drive and me and my ma are pretty esoteric.
Her and her sisters are a coven , I swear,Lol!The only thing they don't belong to is a UFO cult!


Anyway... in casual conversation I had mentioned Oak Island and they hadn't heard very much about it so I gave them a quick synopsis and recap of this new TV series.

Then It "CLICKED" and I remembered 

Here was My Stepfather... A Carpenter and Jack of All Trades with my mom in the same vehicle.

I said to my stepdad: Glen,When you worked at the Legislature did you ever hear of the tunnel(s) From the legislature under the lake that go to OTHER GOV'T buildings?

He said he was unaware of any... sloughed it off,change subject kinda response. Whistle


Heh! Heh! Heh!  Time to apply 'pressure'  LilD

His Ol' Lady(My Momma) was not on his radar... Luv as I put two and two together.

I Said:

"Well,Mom.
You told me that there were tunnels. I said pointedly." Arrow  setting up a nice, non-evasive action,lol!


(Note how I tactfully Put the story in her hands!!!  Heh!)


"Yes there are Tunnels,Glen."she said. Naughty (She has Personal knowledge of them.She saw it but never traversed them but worked with others who had.)

They are Access to the Provincial infrastructures she made sure to de-mystify me so I don't get too conspiring. Alien2

My stepdad was basically non-cooperating,mums the word and said he'd never seen any.


Mom's the word Sheep Mums the word.


He seemed he was less than straightforward and non-forthcomming,for some reason.

It was no big deal.

He Said-She Said --- with confidence siding with my Momma! Naturally.


A few months later I'm relocating a client and his dad was there.

He wanted us to move him in a year or so and he had mentioned he just came back from B.C.(British Columbia)

I Said I was Just there on vacation there earlier and I mentioned my parents new hometown.


He seemed taken aback...he was just there!

I said well do you know: and I named my parents.

He not only knew them but had Worked with my Stepdad at the Ledgislature.
They would have to make repairs to the Copper Dome and other Carpentry and Maintenance.


After a Minute it Clicked:  

My mistake with my Stepdad is that I asked him first.

I should have asked my mom First and his story might have been...   well you'll see in a moment.



Instead of asking Mr.Silverthorn about the tunnels I alerted the crew to gather round.

We were like 3 teamsters with all of his son's possessions in OUR possession and doing an inquisition.

They have heard of the tunnels (local-folklore) so I Inquizzed:

"My mom and Glen told me about the tunnels under the lake."

He confirmed,we felt vindicated.

Big enough to drive little utility vehicles through.

Bomb shelters etc? Cold-War?


Long story short...
The Secret Gov't Tunnels Under the Fake Lake.
They just did a Big Dig that gouged more depth to the Fake Lake a decade ago and Totally overhauled and dug-out the Foundations of the Ledgeslature too,
[Image: sunrise-legislative-dome.jpg]
Recently they Re-Capped / Re-Coppered the Dome last year...

there are Tunnels under this Pile of Bones and the Artificial Lake named Wascana.



Man Made Bodies of Water And Tunnels do really occur.
To keep a Government ongoing in function over the due course of time.



My next Visit to see the folks will be awesome... as I present evidence Mr. Silverthorn.  Lol!
Glen better have a shot of Gibson's finest... before we re-visit The Secret Gov't Tunnels Under the Fake Lake.

My Stepdad's coworker spilled the beans...not a myth. 
Reply
#9
Secrets of Puebla Tunnels

A 500-year-old series of tunnels long believed to be folkloric was uncovered beneath the streets of Puebla. 

[Image: IMG_3544.JPG]
In the alley of Cinco de Mayo Road there’s a doorway leading underground that looks to be an entrance to a subway. But in Puebla there are no subways. It is in fact the tiny entrance to a recently discovered secret of the city, a tunnel system used to connect a fort with the baroque city of Puebla.
[Image: IMG_3517.JPG]
The underground tunnel system dates back to 1531, but wasn’t unearthed and opened to the public until 2016. It had been covered for decades, and the archeologist who unearthed the tunnel discovered antiques in the mud. Today it operates as a free museum that doubles as a citywide thoroughfare.

[Image: IMG_3737.JPG]

Many Mexican cities have legends about secret tunnels lying just beneath the streets, used during the revolution either by royalty or even during the inquisition. Grandparents would tell these folk stories to children. The discovery of the Puebla tunnel lends some credence to the folklore.

The tunnel—tall enough that a person could comfortably ride through on horseback—originates in the historic center of Puebla and lets out to the Loreto fort, where the Cinco de Mayo battle occurred. Archeologists first discerned that it was a complex sewer system, but another discovery led them to believe that people also used the tunnels for secret travel.

Along with toys, marbles, and antique kitchen goods, a lot of guns, bullets, and gunpowder were found trapped in the mud. The weaponry was mostly from the mid-19th century, around the time  of the Battle of Puebla conflict between Mexico and France. Investigators believe these tunnels may have been used by soldiers during the war of Mexican liberation, though they also could have been used by clergy or even common folk. 

The tour across the tunnel includes a guided visit by archaeologists who worked in the project and displays where one can see the items that lay in the mud for so long. The tunnel museum is known as “Secrets of Puebla,” an apt name for the mysterious tunnels that lay hidden beneath the city for so long.
[Image: IMG_3731.JPG]
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/secre...atlas-page



Fake Lake WASCANA with Confirmed Underground Tunnels
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Our Original Native name was:   "Pile 'O Bones" 
[Image: 1147702.jpg?size=640x420]

[Image: skpic-big-dig-regina-wascana-lake.jpeg]

[Image: Tractor1.JPG]

[Image: big_dig_2_121.jpg]

[Image: skpic-big-dig-wascana-regina.jpeg]

[Image: CmACQcZUgAQi5Qz.jpg]

Man Made Body of Water...With Itz own Police Force.(Wascana Authority)   

Whatz Underneath it???

Whatz Beneath Oak Island???
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#10
If they find anything from the Templars
would The Vatican have a claim
since all such material assets of The Order
were ordered confiscated by The Inquisition?
The brothers better watch out for Swiss Guard
scuba divers offering their "services".

Why would The Holy See be interested?
Such relics are involved in esoteric rituals.
The twisted metal pillars in The Vatican
were melted down bronze panels pillaged
from inside The Pantheon dome.
Reply
#11
Quote:If they find anything from the Templars

would The Vatican have a claim

KR... Not a Hope in Hell.  LilD

Quote:Archeologists are often brought into assess areas where construction is planned, like downtown Halifax. (Yvonne Colbert/CBC)

The assessments are important because Nova Scotia is chock full of archeological artifacts. Habitation by the Mi'kmaq, Europeans, African Nova Scotians and Acadians have left a treasure trove of items buried beneath our feet. 

Archeological artifacts are protected under Nova Scotia's Special Places Protection Act. Artifacts can't be removed unless the province provides a permit to do so.

The Lagina Bros and Co. may not even be able to keep anything. Cry

They have a lot of Red Tape to cut through if they find any Relics is what I hear...  Ninja



Nova Scotian archeologists dig deep to help buildings go up
'Nobody wants a project to be slowed down at the 11th hour because of something that's been found'
By David Burke, CBC News Posted: Mar 14, 2017 7:00 AM AT Last Updated: Mar 14, 2017 7:00 AM AT


[Image: smu-students-dig.JPG]
Archeologists are busy in Nova Scotia often examining sites for future developments for signs of archeological artifacts. In this file photo, Saint Mary's University continuing education students learn the basics of archeology while searching for the remains of a British fort in Lunenburg. (Stephanie vanKampen/CBC News)

Archeological work is experiencing a boom in Nova Scotia as developers become increasingly interested in what lies beneath the surface, says the curator of archeology for the Nova Scotia Museum. 

Catherine Cottreau-Robins said in most cases archeologists are being hired by developers who don't want to risk disturbing archeological sites when they start a new building project.  

In the last 10 years, the number of heritage research permits the province issues annually for archeological work has jumped to about 125 from 50 or 60.

"Developers are more and more keen on archeology," said Cottreau-Robins.

"They incorporate archeology as a part of their development process. Many of the permits for archeological work that are issued are associated with new development."

Archeology is the study of human history and prehistory through people's tools, objects and remains buried in the earth. 

[Image: catherine-cottreau-robins.jpg]Catherine Cottreau-Robins is the archeology curator for the Nova Scotia Museum. She says there is more archeological work happening in the province than ever before. (Nova Scotia Museum)

Artifacts are protected

Archeological resource impact assessments are done to determine if a potential construction site could house archeological artifacts.

Sometimes those assessments involve archeologists simply researching an area to determine if it's likely to have artifacts buried there, other times the archeologists have to do a dig as well.

Those assessments are often done for new apartment buildings, condominiums and highways before construction starts. 

[img=788x0]https://i.cbc.ca/1.3335596.1460847373!/fileImage/httpImage/image.JPG_gen/derivatives/original_620/nova-centre.JPG[/img]Archeologists are often brought into assess areas where construction is planned, like downtown Halifax. (Yvonne Colbert/CBC)

The assessments are important because Nova Scotia is chock full of archeological artifacts. Habitation by the Mi'kmaq, Europeans, African Nova Scotians and Acadians have left a treasure trove of items buried beneath our feet. 

Archeological artifacts are protected under Nova Scotia's Special Places Protection Act. Artifacts can't be removed unless the province provides a permit to do so.

Archeological work can save time and money

If archeologists working for a developer find an artifact on a potential work site, the item is either removed or the development may have to change its construction plans so it won't damage the artifact.

The province can also issue a stop-work order on a site if it feels artifacts might be in danger.

"Nobody wants a project to be slowed down at the 11th hour because of something that's been found that we could have avoided or could have known about earlier on," said Sean Weseloh-McKeane, the special places co-ordinator with the provincial Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

"That costs money for developers, it costs money for [the] provincial government."

Weseloh-McKeane believes there's an increased awareness of archeology's importance among developers and even other government departments, and that is most likely driving the increase in permits. 

"This is just something that can help facilitate those projects running more smoothly if the archeology is included up front as part of the planning process."

'You want to see new discoveries made'

He said the increased work has also created demand for archeologists.

"There are certainly more archeologists working in the field than would have been the case 10 or 15 years ago, absolutely."

Cottreau-Robins said places like downtown Halifax, along with areas around watersheds and major rivers in the province, likely house artifacts because people lived in those areas for long stretches of time.

There are already 2,000 recorded archeological sites in Nova Scotia.

"It's been great, it's been exciting," said Cottreau-Robins.

"As an archeologist, you want to see archeology happening, you want to see new discoveries made, you want to learn about the past."

[Image: remnants-of-fortress.jpg]The remnants of what might be part of a British fort built in 1753 in Lunenburg. (Stephanie vanKampen/CBC News)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scoti...-1.4022801
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#12
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFJLtQca8cY
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#13
In the Next city to Regina(Pile O' Bones) is Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Just as Legendary as any Pirate  Par-ty LilD and as Old as Charlie Chaplin Chaplin 

Was Al Capone and his Skullduggery. (and secret tunnels too!!!)
[Image: chicago-home.jpg]

[Image: provincial-map.jpg]


[Image: logo.jpg]
[Image: homepage.jpg]
The Chicago Connection
You're bootleggers in 1929. You come to Moose Jaw to buy booze from the Capone organization. You've got to learn the ropes and stay out of the way of the local police chief. You start out at Miss Fanny's club and end up in a tunnel, somewhere underground. And the only one who knows the way out is Gus, one of Capone's goons.
**The Chicago Connection has several flights of stairs. Families with young children should be aware that there are some loud noises and 'surprises' along the way.**



[Image: passage-home.jpg]
Passage to Fortune
The Passage to Fortune tells the story of early Chinese immigrants to Canada. You become an Immigrant and follow in their footsteps through Burrows and Sons Laundry, in darkened tunnels under the streets and in the kitchen of Mr. Wong's cafe. Your passage to fortune is just around the corner.
 
**The Passage to Fortune has one short flight of stairs which is equipped with a lift and is otherwise on one level for easy access. Parents are advised that when the tour guide changes character, he/she can seem intimidating to young children.**

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#14
update:

Treasure found on The Curse of Oak Island: Season 6 trailer reveals team find gold
20th September 2018 by Julian Cheatle
Leave a Comment
[Image: rick-marty-lagina-treasure-found-oak-island-2018.jpg]Stills from The Curse of Oak Island Season 6 trailer, as Marty Lagina examines an item, thought possibly to be the gold that’s discovered, while brother Rick speaks to the camera
Join our newsletter to get more adventure show stories like this

The team from History’s hit show The Curse of Oak Island has found gold during its hunt for treasure.


The groundbreaking discovery is revealed in a new trailer for the show’s sixth season.

It comes after “game-changing” new technology was used on the island this year, which allowed the team to “see” underneath the ground in the famous Money Pit area.


The trailer also shows scenes from massive excavation works that have taken place on the island’s Smith’s Cove in 2018, following the discovery of a medieval lead cross there last year.

Footage of operations in the Money Pit area shows controlled blasts taking place on a physical grid system marked out on the surface using what appear to be explosives.
Marty Lagina says in the clip: “We have discovered new technology…” before brother Rick adds: “…that’s going to make last year’s operations almost insignificant.”

He adds: “For the first time, we can look underground in the Money Pit. It’s a game-changer.”
A separate scene then sees Marty Lagina telling the treasure-hunting team during a meeting in the island’s so-called War Room: “We have found our first gold on Oak Island.”

The comment comes as footage shows Marty Lagina and metal-detecting expert Gary Drayton examining an object, which is thought could be the gold item. Drayton then remarks: “Unbelievable.”

Marty Lagina says at the beginning of the clip: “We’re trying our best to make this island give up her secrets.”

At the end of the clip, he adds: “This year the dream comes true.”
Various new shots of the island are revealed in the new The Curse of Oak Island Season 6 trailer, which was released by the History channel along with a comment confirming that The Curse of Oak Island Season 6 air date has been set for November.



Drone footage gives an aerial view of the excavation work that has taken place at Smith’s Cove this year, after the uncovering of a u-shaped structure there last season. The structure was first discovered by treasure-hunters Dan Blankenship and David Tobias back in the 1970s.

[Image: the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-2.jpg]
[img=0x0]https://www.monstersandcritics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-2.jpg[/img]Smith’s Cove, with a cofferdam built around it, seen in drone footage
Another scene shows brothers Rick and Marty walking along the edge of a cofferdam erected around the cove, while a separate aerial shot shows Rick, Craig Tester and Gary Drayton standing inside the excavated area examining something.

The shot reveals Smith’s Cove has been drained of water, and a wooden structure is clearly visible inside.

[Image: the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-5.jpg]
[img=0x0]https://www.monstersandcritics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-5.jpg[/img]Rick Lagina, Craig Tester, and Gary Drayton as seen in Smith’s Cove, which has been drained of water

[Image: the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-4.jpg]
At one point in the trailer, Rick and Gary Drayton are seen sharing a fist-pump. Other scenes show the Money Pit area from the air, including what appears to be the controlled explosives set out in a grid pattern on the ground. Several camera shots show parts of the grid exploding, sending dirt flying up into the air.
[Image: the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-3.jpg]
[img=0x0]https://www.monstersandcritics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-4.jpg[/img]The grid on the ground in the Money Pit area is made up of what appear to be controlled explosive devices[img=0x0]https://www.monstersandcritics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-3.jpg[/img]A close-up of the apparent controlled explosive devices set up in a pattern
Separate footage shows the Money Pit area from above with what appears to be two new caissons sunk into the ground.

[Image: the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-1.jpg]
[img=0x0]https://www.monstersandcritics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/the-curse-of-oak-island-season-6-still-1.jpg[/img]An aerial shot of the caissons in the ground at the Money Pit area
The Curse of Oak Island Season 6 comes after the team had its most successful season so far last year — discovering everything from the medieval cross to a rhodolite garnet gemstone and human bones.

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#15
They find nothing from there,
Every piece of wood they have found is overscaled to treasure.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)