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2 Navy Airmen and an Object That ‘Accelerated Like Nothing I’ve Ever Seen’
Quote:The jets got the radar upgrades a decade ago, 
then all of a sudden there are flying tic tacs with multiple encounters,
then TTSA gets Pentagon footage years later,
but,
nobody is saying shit about what is happening right now in the same skies where there were seen in 2014,
or elsewhere for that matter.


Phononic Vintage Vimana Voxels
Vianova We need a benchmark that is easy to audibly visualize for tactile comparison that passes the sniff test and tastes finer with more age.

Quote:just as light waves can be described as photons, or a particles of light, phonons are a way to describe sound waves that emerge from the complicated interactions of the fluid molecules, Krichevsky said. No physical particle emerges, but researchers can use the mathematics of particles to describe it.
And it turns out, the researchers showed, these emergent phonons have a tiny mass — meaning that when gravity tugs on them, they move in the opposite direction.
"In a gravitational field phonons slowly accelerate in the opposite direction that you would expect, say, a brick to fall," Krichevsky said.


Alien2  =??? m/s UFO's (Mock Won)  Sheep (Mach One)OUR's~333 m/s =  Cry
 
[Image: speed-breaks-sound-barrier_74a2dba478c59...1&fit=crop]

Quote:What speed defines Mach 1? and why?
Asked by: Anthony Matarazzo

Answer
Mach number is a common 'ratio' unit of speed when one is talking about aircrafts. By definition, [b]Mach number is a ratio of the speed of a body (aircraft) to the speed of sound[/b] in the undisturbed medium through which the body is traveling. It is said that the aircraft is flying at Mach 1 if its speed is equal to the speed of sound in air (which is 332 m/s or 1195 km/hr or 717 miles/hour.) An aircraft flying at Mach 2 is flying at twice the speed of sound in air, etc.

Mach numbers are named after [b]Ernst Mach[/b] (1838-1916), an Austrian philosopher and physicist. The term Mach number came into use in 1929.
Answered by: Anton Skorucak, M.S. Physics, PhysLink.com Creator


Researchers Find Source of Strange 'Negative' Gravity
By Rafi Letzter August 10, 2018 Strange News 

[*][Image: TFLMfzgPg9ikeEKgVqv89A-320-80.jpg]Scientists have long thought of soundwaves as massless, and this image of the sound waves surrounding a supersonic jet sure look that way. But new research suggests that isn't quite the case.
[*](Image: © Shutterstock)
The speed of sound in air (which is ~333 m/s)
Sound has negative mass, and all around you it's drifting up, up and away — albeit very slowly.
That's the conclusion of a paper submitted on July 23 to the preprint journal arXiv, and it shatters the conventional understanding that researchers have long had of sound waves: as massless ripples that zip through matter, giving molecules a shove but ultimately balancing any forward or upward motion with an equal and opposite downward motion. That's a straightforward model that will explain the behavior of sound in most circumstances, but it's not quite true, the new paper argues. [The Mysterious Physics of 7 Everyday Things]
A phonon — a particle-like unit of vibration that can describe sound at very small scales — has a very slight negative mass, and that means sound waves travel upward ever so slightly, said Rafael Krichevsky, a graduate student in physics at Columbia University.
Phonons aren't particles of the sort most people typically imagine, like atoms or molecules, said Krichevsky, who published the paper along with Angelo Esposito, a graduate student in physics at Columbia University, and Alberto Nicolis, an associate physics professor at Columbia.



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When sound moves through air it vibrates the molecules around it, but that vibration can't be easily described by the movement of the molecules themselves, Krichevsky told Live Science in an email.
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[*]Instead, just as light waves can be described as photons, or a particles of light, phonons are a way to describe sound waves that emerge from the complicated interactions of the fluid molecules, Krichevsky said. No physical particle emerges, but researchers can use the mathematics of particles to describe it.
And it turns out, the researchers showed, these emergent phonons have a tiny mass — meaning that when gravity tugs on them, they move in the opposite direction.
"In a gravitational field phonons slowly accelerate in the opposite direction that you would expect, say, a brick to fall," Krichevsky said.

To understand how this might work, imagine a normal fluid in which gravity acts downward. Fluid particles will compress the particles below it, so that it's slightly denser lower down. Physicists already know that sound typically moves faster through denser media than through less-dense media — so the speed of sound above a phonon will be slower than the speed of sound through the slightly denser particles below it. That causes the phonon to "deflect" upward, Krichevsky said.
This process happens with large-scale sound waves, too, Krichevsky said. That includes every bit of sound that comes out of your mouth — albeit only very slightly. Over a long-enough distance, the sound of you saying "hello" would bend upward into the sky.
The effect is too tiny to measure with existing technology, the researchers wrote in the new paper, which has not been peer-reviewed.
But it's not impossible that, down the road, a very precise measurement could be made using super-precise clocks that would detect the slight curvature of a phonon's path. (The New Scientist suggested heavy-metal music would be a fun candidate for such an experiment in their original report on the subject.)
And there are real consequences to this discovery, the researcher wrote. In the dense cores of neutron stars, where sound waves move at nearly the speed of light, an anti-gravitational sound wave should have real effects on the whole star's behavior.
For now, though, this is entirely theoretical — something to ponder as sound falls upward all around us.
[i]Originally published on Live Science.[/i]


[i]https://www.livescience.com/63305-sound-...-mass.html[/i]



APRIL 17, 2017

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[*]Physicists create 'negative mass'

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[*]by Eric Sorensen, Washington State University
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[*][Image: 58f4cb2c665e6.png]Experimental TOF images of the effectively 1D expanding SOC BEC for expansion times of 0, 10, and 14 ms.
Washington State University physicists have created a fluid with negative mass, which is exactly what it sounds like. Push it, and unlike every physical object in the world we know, it doesn't accelerate in the direction it was pushed. It accelerates backwards.

The phenomenon is rarely created in laboratory conditions and can be used to explore some of the more challenging concepts of the cosmos, said Michael Forbes, a WSU assistant professor of physics and astronomy and an affiliate assistant professor at the University of Washington. The research appears today in the journal [i]Physical Review Letters
, where it is featured as an "Editor's Suggestion."
Hypothetically, matter can have negative mass in the same sense that an electric charge can be either negative or positive. People rarely think in these terms, and our everyday world sees only the positive aspects of Isaac Newton's Second Law of Motion, in which a force is equal to the mass of an object times its acceleration, or F=ma.In other words, if you push an object, it will accelerate in the direction you're pushing it. Mass will accelerate in the direction of the force.
"That's what most things that we're used to do," said Forbes, hinting at the bizarreness to come. "With negative mass, if you push something, it accelerates toward you."
[b]Conditions for negative mass[/b]
He and his colleagues created the conditions for negative mass by cooling rubidium atoms to just a hair above absolute zero, creating what is known as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In this state, predicted by Satyendra Nath Bose and Albert Einstein, particles move extremely slowly and, following the principles of quantum mechanics, behave like waves. They also synchronize and move in unison as what is known as a superfluid, which flows without losing energy.
Led by Peter Engels, WSU professor of physics and astronomy, researchers on the sixth floor of Webster Hall created these conditions by using lasers to slow the particles, making them colder, and allowing hot, high energy particles to escape like steam, cooling the material further.
The lasers trapped the atoms as if they were in a bowl measuring less than a hundred microns across. At this point, the rubidium superfluid has regular mass. Breaking the bowl will allow the rubidium to rush out, expanding as the rubidium in the center pushes outward.
To create negative mass, the researchers applied a second set of lasers that kicked the atoms back and forth and changed the way they spin. Now when the rubidium rushes out fast enough, if behaves as if it has negative mass."Once you push, it accelerates backwards," said Forbes, who acted as a theorist analyzing the system. "It looks like the rubidium hits an invisible wall."
[b]Avoiding underlying defects[/b]
The technique used by the WSU researchers avoids some of the underlying defects encountered in previous attempts to understand negative mass.
"What's a first here is the exquisite control we have over the nature of this negative mass, without any other complications" said Forbes. Their research clarifies, in terms of negative mass, similar behavior seen in other systems.This heightened control gives researchers a new tool to engineer experiments to study analogous physics in astrophysics, like neutron stars, and cosmological phenomena like black holes and dark energy, where experiments are impossible."It provides another environment to study a fundamental phenomenon that is very peculiar," Forbes said.
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Explore further
Destabilized solitons perform a disappearing act



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[b]More information:[/b] M. A. Khamehchi et al, Negative-Mass Hydrodynamics in a Spin-Orbit–coupled Bose-Einstein Condensate, [i]Physical Review Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.155301
[b]Journal information:[/b] Physical Review Letters [/url]

Provided by [url=https://phys.org/partners/washington-state-university/]Washington State University

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https://phys.org/news/2017-04-physicists...-mass.html

Sounds Heavy Metal 
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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RE: 2 Navy Airmen and an Object That ‘Accelerated Like Nothing I’ve Ever Seen’ - by EA - 10-13-2019, 12:40 AM

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