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Insight In-Situ: Inciting a revolution in Mars revelation.(@ Elysium Planitia)
#34
(11-29-2018, 03:39 PM)Kalter Rauch Wrote: The InSight spec for the seismo 
is being touted as sensitive 
to the displacement of 1/2 the width of a hydrogen atom.

Hmm2What's that supposed to mean?


I think this must refer to some ultra S/N ratio,
since any such faint signals would be drowned out by anything.


It should deliver a trove of anomalous waveforms.
 [Image: hmm2.gif]What's that supposed to mean?
Arrow One for V- Pi Found in Mathematical Calculation of the Hydrogen Atom



Safely on Mars, InSight unfolds its arrays and snaps some pics

November 29, 2018

[Image: areplicaofth.jpg]
A replica of the Mars InSight lander at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, showing instruments used to study the planet
After safely landing on Mars following its nearly seven month journey, NASA has released the first pictures taken by its InSight spacecraft, which has opened it solar arrays to charge batteries.




The $993 million lander, which landed on Monday and appears to be in good shape, will soon begin unfolding its robotic arm and deploying its quake-sensors on the Martian surface.

NASA engineers are planning to begin work with its robotic arm soon, but are proceeding with caution.

The arm has five mechanical fingers to help it lift out and place its two instruments on Martian soil in the coming few months.

"Slowly releasing all my pent-up tension, starting with loosening my grapple, as these before-and-after pics show," said the NASAInSight Twitter account.

"Until I'm ready to stretch my arm out, my camera angles will be the same."

InSight is equipped with two full-color cameras and has already sent back six shots since touching down.

The waist-high spacecraft will stay in place for the two-year duration of its mission.

NASA has not said anything about the condition of the other instruments on board, which include a French-made seismometer to study Marsquakes and a German self-hammering mole to measure heat's escape from the planet.

[Image: oneofthefirs.jpg]
One of the first images taken by the Mars InSight lander and released by NASA after the probe landed on the surface of the Red Planet
NASA did say its solar arrays have deployed, which is good news since the lander runs on solar energy.

In Paris, the French space agency CERN said everything seems fine for the moment, and that it is up to NASA to communicate with the SEIS quake-sensing instrument.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: InSight is catching rays on Mars


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-safely-mars-insight-unfolds-arrays.html#jCp


Quote:Did they find life already ?

Recall:  Arrow #21

Wednesday, November 21st, 2018, 10:31 pm

SAY CHEESE:


InSight's first job, just several minutes after landing, is to take a picture. Ground controllers want to see what they're up against. Big rocks or a hillside could interfere with the stationary lander's geology experiments. Once the red dust settles about 16 minutes after touchdown, the lander will spread its solar panels and settle in for its first long winter's nap at Mars.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-mars-minutes-month.html#jCp
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#35
Seismic unit measures if hammer unit still working or not.

Holycowsmile
Reply
#36
NASA's Martian quake sensor InSight lands at slight angle
December 1, 2018

[Image: the993millio.jpg]
The $993 million InSight lander arrived at its target, a lava plain named Elysium Planitia, for a two-year mission aimed at better understanding how Earth's neighboring planet formed
NASA's unmanned Martian quake sensor, InSight, has landed at a slight angle on the Red Planet, and experts are hopeful the spacecraft will work as planned, the US space agency said Friday.




The $993 million lander arrived Monday at its target, a lava plain named Elysium Planitia, for a two-year mission aimed at better understanding how Earth's neighboring planet formed.

"The vehicle sits slightly tilted (about 4 degrees) in a shallow dust- and sand-filled impact crater known as a 'hollow,'" NASA said in a statement.

InSight was engineered to operate on a surface with an inclination up to 15 degrees.

Therefore, experts are hopeful that its two main instruments—a quake sensor and self-hammering mole to measure heat below the surface—will work as planned.

"We couldn't be happier," said InSight project manager Tom Hoffman of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

"There are no landing pads or runways on Mars, so coming down in an area that is basically a large sandbox without any large rocks should make instrument deployment easier and provide a great place for our mole to start burrowing."

The first pictures from the lander show just a few rocks in the vicinity, more good news since touching down right near a rocky area would have made deployment of the solar arrays and instruments tricky.

Better images are expected in the coming days once InSight sheds the dust covers on its two cameras.

"We are looking forward to higher-definition pictures to confirm this preliminary assessment," said Bruce Banerdt, principal investigator of InSight at NASA.

"If these few images—with resolution-reducing dust covers on—are accurate, it bodes well for both instrument deployment and the mole penetration of our subsurface heat-flow experiment."

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Safely on Mars, InSight unfolds its arrays and snaps some pics


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-nasa-martian-quake-sensor-insight.html#jCp
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With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#37
NASA's Mars InSight flexes its arm
December 7, 2018 by Andrew Good, NASA

[Image: nasasmarsins.jpg]
This image from InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
New images from NASA's Mars InSight lander show its robotic arm is ready to do some lifting.




With a reach of nearly 6 feet (2 meters), the arm will be used to pick up science instruments from the lander's deck, gently setting them on the Martian surface at Elysium Planitia, the lava plain where InSight touched down on Nov. 26.

But first, the arm will use its Instrument Deployment Camera, located on its elbow, to take photos of the terrain in front of the lander. These images will help mission team members determine where to set InSight's seismometer and heat flow probe - the only instruments ever to be robotically placed on the surface of another planet.

"Today we can see the first glimpses of our workspace," said Bruce Banerdt, the mission's principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "By early next week, we'll be imaging it in finer detail and creating a full mosaic."

Another camera, called the Instrument Context Camera, is located under the lander's deck. It will also offer views of the workspace, though the view won't be as pretty.

"We had a protective cover on the Instrument Context Camera, but somehow dust still managed to get onto the lens," said Tom Hoffman of JPL, InSight's project manager. "While this is unfortunate, it will not affect the role of the camera, which is to take images of the area in front of the lander where our instruments will eventually be placed."

[Image: 1-nasasmarsins.jpg]
An image of InSight's robotic arm, with its scoop and stowed grapple, poised above the Martian soil. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Placement is critical, and the team is proceeding with caution. Two to three months could go by before the instruments have been situated and calibrated.

Over the past week and a half, mission engineers have been testing those instruments and spacecraft systems, ensuring they're in working order. A couple instruments are even recording data: a drop in air pressure, possibly caused by a passing dust devil, was detected by the pressure sensor. This, along with a magnetometer and a set of wind and temperature sensors, are part of a package called the Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem, which will collect meteorological data.



More images from InSight's arm were scheduled to come down this past weekend. However, imaging was momentarily interrupted, resuming the following day. During the first few weeks in its new home, InSight has been instructed to be extra careful, so anything unexpected will trigger what's called a fault. Considered routine, it causes the spacecraft to stop what it is doing and ask for help from operators on the ground.



[Image: 2-nasasmarsins.jpg]
A partial view of the deck of NASA's InSight lander, where it stands on the Martian plains Elysium Planitia. The image was received on Dec. 4, 2018 (Sol 8). Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech"We did extensive testing on Earth. But we know that everything is a little different for the lander on Mars, so faults are not unusual," Hoffman said. "They can delay operations, but we're not in a rush. We want to be sure that each operation that we perform on Mars is safe, so we set our safety monitors to be fairly sensitive initially."


Spacecraft engineers had already factored extra time into their estimates for instrument deployment to account for likely delays caused by faults. The mission's primary mission is scheduled for two Earth years, or one Mars year - plenty of time to gather data from the Red Planet's surface.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: InSight is catching rays on Mars

More information: For more information about InSight, visit mars.nasa.gov/insight/ 

Provided by: NASA


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-nasa-mars-...m.html#jCp







InSight lander 'hears' Martian winds

December 7, 2018 by Dwayne Brown, NASA

[Image: insightlande.jpg]
One of InSight's 7-foot (2.2 meter) wide solar panels was imaged by the lander's Instrument Deployment Camera, which is fixed to the elbow of its robotic arm. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport InSight lander, which touched down on Mars just 10 days ago, has provided the first ever "sounds" of Martian winds on the Red Planet. A media teleconference about these sounds will be held today at 12:30 p.m. EST (9:30 a.m. PST).




InSight sensors captured a haunting low rumble caused by vibrations from the wind, estimated to be blowing between 10 to 15 mph (5 to 7 meters a second) on Dec. 1, from northwest to southeast. The winds were consistent with the direction of dust devil streaks in the landing area, which were observed from orbit.

"Capturing this audio was an unplanned treat," said Bruce Banerdt, InSight principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. "But one of the things our mission is dedicated to is measuring motion on Mars, and naturally that includes motion caused by sound waves."

Two very sensitive sensors on the spacecraft detected these wind vibrations: an air pressure sensor inside the lander and a seismometer sitting on the lander's deck, awaiting deployment by InSight's robotic arm. The two instruments recorded the wind noise in different ways. The air pressure sensor, part of the Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem (APSS), which will collect meteorological data, recorded these air vibrations directly. The seismometer recorded lander vibrations caused by the wind moving over the spacecraft's solar panels, which are each 7 feet (2.2 meters) in diameter and stick out from the sides of the lander like a giant pair of ears.



This is the only phase of the mission during which the seismometer, called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure SEIS, will be capable of detecting vibrations generated directly by the lander. In a few weeks, it will be placed on the Martian surface by InSight's robotic arm, then covered by a domed shield to protect it from wind and temperature changes. It still will detect the lander's movement, though channeled through the Martian surface. For now, it's recording vibrational data that scientists later will be able to use to cancel out noise from the lander when SEIS is on the surface, allowing them to detect better actual marsquakes.

When earthquakes occur on Earth, their vibrations, which bounce around inside our planet, make it "ring" similar to how a bell creates sound. InSight will see if tremors, or marsquakes, have a similar effect on Mars. SEIS will detect these vibrations that will tell us about the Red Planet's deep interior. Scientists hope this will lead to new information on the formation of the planets in our solar system, perhaps even of our own planet.



SEIS, France's Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), includes two sets of seismometers. Those contributed by the French will be used once SEIS is deployed from the deck of the lander. But SEIS also includes short period (SP) silicon sensors developed by Imperial College London with electronics from Oxford University in the United Kingdom. These sensors can work while on the deck of the lander and are capable of detecting vibrations up to frequencies of nearly 50 hertz, at the lower range of human hearing.




"The InSight lander acts like a giant ear," said Tom Pike, InSight science team member and sensor designer at Imperial College London. "The solar panels on the lander's sides respond to pressure fluctuations of the wind. It's like InSight is cupping its ears and hearing the Mars wind beating on it. When we looked at the direction of the lander vibrations coming from the solar panels, it matches the expected wind direction at our landing site."


Pike compared the effect to a flag in the wind. As a flag breaks up the wind, it creates oscillations in air pressure that the human ear perceives as flapping. Separately, APSS records changes in pressure directly from the thin Martian air.

"That's literally what sound is—changes in air pressure," said Don Banfield InSight's science lead for APSS from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. "You hear that whenever you speak to someone across the room."

[Image: 1-insightlande.jpg]
The spectrogram of vibrations (frequency spectrum over time) recorded by two of the three sensors of the short period seismometer on NASA’s InSight lander on Mars. This spectrogram shows the first 1,000 seconds, roughly 20 minutes, of …more
Unlike the vibrations recorded by the short period sensors, audio from APSS is about 10 hertz, below the range of human hearing.

The raw audio sample from the seismometer was released unaltered; a second version was raised two octaves to be more perceptible to the human ear—especially when heard through laptop or mobile speakers. The second audio sample from APSS was sped up by a factor of 100, which shifted it up in frequency.

An even clearer sound from Mars is yet to come. In just a couple years, NASA's Mars 2020 rover is scheduled to land with two microphones on board. The first, provided by JPL, is included specifically to record, for the first time, the sound of a Mars landing. The second is part of the SuperCam and will be able to detect the sound of the instrument's laser as it zaps different materials. This will help identify these materials based on the change in sound frequency.





[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: NASA's Mars InSight flexes its arm

More information: www.nasa.gov/insightmarswind 

Provided by: NASA


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-insight-lander-martian.html#jCp
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#38
Ahead of schedule with the seismometer...

https://www.breitbart.com/news/mars-land...d-surface/
Reply
#39
Thanx KR!

InSight places first instrument on Mars
December 20, 2018, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

[Image: insightplace.jpg]
NASA's InSight lander placed its seismometer on Mars on Dec. 19, 2018. This was the first time a seismometer had ever been placed onto the surface of another planet. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA's InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone. New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. It looks as if all is calm and all is bright for InSight, heading into the end of the year.




"InSight's timetable of activities on Mars has gone better than we hoped," said InSight Project Manager Tom Hoffman, who is based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "Getting the seismometer safely on the ground is an awesome Christmas present."

The InSight team has been working carefully toward deploying its two dedicated science instruments onto Martian soil since landing on Mars on Nov. 26. Meanwhile, the Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment (RISE), which does not have its own separate instrument, has already begun using InSight's radio connection with Earth to collect preliminary data on the planet's core. Not enough time has elapsed for scientists to deduce what they want to know—scientists estimate they might have some results starting in about a year.

To deploy the seismometer (also known as the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure, or SEIS) and the heat probe (also known as the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Probe, or HP3), engineers first had to verify the robotic arm that picks up and places InSight's instruments onto the Martian surface was working properly. Engineers tested the commands for the lander, making sure a model in the test bed at JPL deployed the instruments exactly as intended. Scientists also had to analyze images of the Martian terrain around the lander to figure out the best places to deploy the instruments.

On Tuesday, Dec. 18, InSight engineers sent up the commands to the spacecraft. On Wednesday, Dec. 19, the seismometer was gently placed onto the ground directly in front of the lander, about as far away as the arm can reach—5.367 feet, or 1.636 meters, away).

"Seismometer deployment is as important as landing InSight on Mars," said InSight Principal Investigator Bruce Banerdt, also based at JPL. "The seismometer is the highest-priority instrument on InSight: We need it in order to complete about three-quarters of our science objectives."

The seismometer allows scientists to peer into the Martian interior by studying ground motion—also known as marsquakes. Each marsquake acts as a kind of flashbulb that illuminates the structure of the planet's interior. By analyzing how seismic waves pass through the layers of the planet, scientists can deduce the depth and composition of these layers.



"Having the seismometer on the ground is like holding a phone up to your ear," said Philippe Lognonné, principal investigator of SEIS from Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) and Paris Diderot University. "We're thrilled that we're now in the best position to listen to all the seismic waves from below Mars' surface and from its deep interior."

In the coming days, the InSight team will work on leveling the seismometer, which is sitting on ground that is tilted 2 to 3 degrees. The first seismometer science data should begin to flow back to Earth after the seismometer is in the right position.

But engineers and scientists at JPL, the French national space agency Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES) and other institutions affiliated with the SEIS team will need several additional weeks to make sure the returned data are as clear as possible. For one thing, they will check and possibly adjust the seismometer's long, wire-lined tether to minimize noise that could travel along it to the seismometer. Then, in early January, engineers expect to command the robotic arm to place the Wind and Thermal Shield over the seismometer to stabilize the environment around the sensors.

Assuming that there are no unexpected issues, the InSight team plans to deploy the heat probe onto the Martian surface by late January. HP3 will be on the east side of the lander's work space, roughly the same distance away from the lander as the seismometer.

For now, though, the team is focusing on getting those first bits of seismic data (however noisy) back from the Martian surface.

"We look forward to popping some Champagne when we start to get data from InSight's seismometer on the ground," Banerdt added. "I have a bottle ready for the occasion."

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: InSight Mars lander takes its first selfie

Provided by: Jet Propulsion Laboratory [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]




Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-insight-instrument-mars.html#jCp
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#40
InSight prepares to take Mars' temperature
February 13, 2019, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

[Image: insightprepa.jpg]
NASA's InSight lander set its heat probe, called the Heat and Physical Properties Package (HP3), on the Martian surface on Feb. 12. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/DLR
NASA's InSight lander has placed its second instrument on the Martian surface. New images confirm that the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package, or HP3, was successfully deployed on Feb. 12 about 3 feet (1 meter) from InSight's seismometer, which the lander recently covered with a protective shield. HP3 measures heat moving through Mars' subsurface and can help scientists figure out how much energy it takes to build a rocky world.




Equipped with a self-hammering spike, mole, the instrument will burrow up to 16 feet (5 meters) below the surface, deeper than any previous mission to the Red Planet. For comparison, NASA's Viking 1 lander scooped 8.6 inches (22 centimeters) down. The agency's Phoenix lander, a cousin of InSight, scooped 7 inches (18 centimeters) down.

"We're looking forward to breaking some records on Mars," said HP3 Principal Investigator Tilman Spohn of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), which provided the heat probe for the InSight mission. "Within a few days, we'll finally break ground using a part of our instrument we call the mole."

HP3 looks a bit like an automobile jack but with a vertical metal tube up front to hold the 16-inch-long (40-centimeter-long) mole. A tether connects HP3's support structure to the lander, while a tether attached to the top of the mole features heat sensors to measure the temperature of the Martian subsurface. Meanwhile, heat sensors in the mole itself will measure the soil's thermal conductivity—how easily heat moves through the subsurface.

"Our probe is designed to measure heat coming from the inside of Mars," said InSight Deputy Principal Investigator Sue Smrekar of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "That's why we want to get it belowground. Temperature changes on the surface, both from the seasons and the day-night cycle, could add 'noise' to our data."

The mole stops about every 20 inches (51 centimeters) to warm up for roughly four days; the sensors check how rapidly this happens, which tells scientists the conductivity of the soil. Between the careful burrowing action, the pauses and the time required for the science team to send commands to the instrument, more than a month will go by before the mole reaches its maximum depth. If the mole extends as far as it can go, the team will need only a few months of data to figure out Mars' internal temperature.

If the mole encounters a large rock before reaching at least 10 feet (3 meters) down, the team will need a full Martian year (two Earth years) to filter noise out of their data. This is one reason the team carefully selected a landing site with few rocks and why it spent weeks choosing where to place the instrument.

"We picked the ideal landing site, with almost no rocks at the surface," said JPL's Troy Hudson, a scientist and engineer who helped design HP3. "That gives us reason to believe there aren't many large rocks in the subsurface. But we have to wait and see what we'll encounter underground."

However deep it gets, there's no debating that the mole is a feat of engineering.

"That thing weighs less than a pair of shoes, uses less power than a Wi-Fi router and has to dig at least 10 feet [3 meters] on another planet," Hudson said. "It took so much work to get a version that could make tens of thousands of hammer strokes without tearing itself apart; some early versions failed before making it to 16 feet [5 meters], but the version we sent to Mars has proven its robustness time and again."

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: NASA's Martian quake sensor InSight lands at slight angle

Provided by: Jet Propulsion Laboratory


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-02-insight-mars-temperature.html#jCp
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#41
Time for an update...

MARCH 4, 2019
Good luck 'Mole'—experiment starts hammering into the Martian soil
by DLR German Aerospace Center
[Image: 5c7d38e3acc87.jpg]GB: RAD radiometer of HP3 for measurements of surface temperature. Supplements temperature data at depth for a long-term measurement of the temperature over a period of up to two years. 14 sensors are soldered at approximately 35-centimetre intervals onto the science tether. Credit: DLR German Aerospace Center
On 28 February 2019, 'Mole' fully automatically hammered its way into the Martian subsurface for the first time. In a first step, it penetrated to a depth between 18 and 50 centimetres into the Martian soil with 4000 hammer blows over a period of four hours. "On its way into the depths, the mole seems to have hit a stone, tilted about 15 degrees and pushed it aside or passed it," reports Tilman Spohn, Principal Investigator of the HP3 experiment. "The Mole then worked its way up against another stone at an advanced depth until the planned four-hour operating time of the first sequence expired. Tests on Earth showed that the rod-shaped penetrometer is able to push smaller stones to the side, which is very time-consuming.

After a cooling-off period, the researchers will command a second four-hour hammering sequence. In the following weeks, with further intervals, they want to reach a target depth of three to five metres on sufficiently porous ground. The Mole will pull a five-metre-long tether equipped with temperature sensors into the Martian soil behind it. The cable is equipped with 14 temperature sensors in order to measure the temperature distribution with depth and its change with time after reaching the target depth and thus the heat flow from the interior of Mars.
The rod-shaped penetrometer uses a fully automatic, electrically powered hammer mechanism to drive itself into the subsurface. A rotating worm gear repeatedly stretches the main spring, which then produces a hammer blow. A second spring absorbs the recoil. "You can imagine the Mars Mole functioning like a large nail that has a built-in hammer," says Torben Wippermann from the DLR Institute of Space Systems, explaining the technology.
[Image: 5c7d394033fd2.jpg]

GB: The "Mole" measures the thermal conductivity of teh soil approximately every 50 centimetres up to a depth of 5 meters. Credit: DLR German Aerospace Center
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The probe pauses after each step for about three Mars days (sols). It cools down for about two days after several hours of hammering, which causes friction and generates heat. Then, it measures the thermal conductivity of the soil at a sufficient depth for one day. "For this purpose, a piece of foil in the shell of the Mole is heated for several hours with a known electrical power," says DLR planetary researcher Matthias Grott. "The simultaneously measured increase in the temperature of the foil then gives us a measure of the thermal conductivity of the soil in its immediate surroundings." In addition, the radiometer mounted on the InSight lander measures the temperature of the Martian soil on the surface, which fluctuates from some degrees above zero degrees Celsius to almost -100 degrees Celsius. Later on, once the target depth has been reached, the data from the temperature and thermal conductivity measurements, along with the radiometer data, is received at the DLR control centre in Cologne, processed and then evaluated by scientists at the DLR Institute of Planetary Research.
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https://phys.org/news/2019-03-good-luck-...-soil.html



Now.>>> 


JUNE 17, 2019
This is what the ground looked like after inSight landed on Mars
by Evan Gough, Universe Today
[Image: thisiswhatth.jpg]Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
When InSight landed on Mars on Nov. 26th, 2018, it deployed a parachute to slow its descent through the thin Martian atmosphere. As it approached the surface, it fired its retro rocket to slow it even more, and then gently touched down on the surface. As it did so, its retro rockets excavated two small pits in the Martian soil.

Once InSight was settled on the smooth surface of Elysium Planitia, it took stock of its surroundings and checked out its systems. On December 14th, the 18th Martial day (sol) of the lander's projected 709 sol mission, it used its Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) to capture this image of the gnarly Martian surface. Clearly visible are two pits excavated by the landers rockets.
InSight's mission is to understand the internal structure of Mars. In turn, scientists will learn how Mars, and other rocky planets in the solar system, formed.
It's safe to say that InSight's primary instrument is the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3.) HP3 has to hammer its way into the surface of Mars to do its job, and it's having problems. As reported in Universe Today last week, HP3, or the Mole, as its known, has stalled at a depth of about 30 cm (11.8 inches.)
NASA and DLR engineers are working on the problem, and they think that cavities have opened up between the Mole and the soil. Since the hammering action of the Mole relies on friction with the soil to penetrate to its required working depth, these cavities are creating problems. Engineers are going to try to use InSight's robotic arm to lift the Mole's support structure away from the probe.
Once they've lifted it away, they can get a better look into the hole and see what the problem is. They may also be able to use the arm to help the Mole work its way into the soil. The problem is, there's a risk of removing the Mole from the soil. And if that happens, it's likely game over. They have no way of gripping the Mole directly and placing it somewhere else.
  • [Image: 2-thisiswhatth.jpg]
    The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package deployed on the Martian surface. Credit: NASA/DLR
  • [Image: 1-thisiswhatth.jpg]
    NASA produced this contrast-enhanced image to better show the detail of the two pits. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
  • [Image: 2-thisiswhatth.jpg]
    The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package deployed on the Martian surface. Credit: NASA/DLR
  • [Image: 1-thisiswhatth.jpg]
    NASA produced this contrast-enhanced image to better show the detail of the two pits. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
  • [Image: 1-thisiswhatth.jpg]
  • [Image: 2-thisiswhatth.jpg]

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Explore further
InSight's team tries new strategy to help the 'mole'[/size]


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Provided by Universe Today[/size]


https://phys.org/news/2019-06-ground-insight-mars.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#42
...
quote V a few weeks ago:
Quote:Mounted on the lander deck at launch. 

Upon landing, the lander's arm picks up HP3 and places it on the surface. 

The mole [Image: naughty.gif]  then hammers itself under the surface  [Image: rofl.gif]  



These are scientists that aren't willing to admit that they may have hit a big rock.
These are scientists that are pretending that this was not a distinct possibility.
This stall or failure was the most easily predicted problem from the get go.
I predicted that the Mole would hit a big rock if I remember correctly.

yep


Quote:Well if the tethers unravel with no probelms,
Ok, great,
and the little probe starts to hammer itself down and into the frozen soil.
What happens down maybe two feet, ... [Image: dunno.gif]
if the Mole [Image: whip.gif] hits a 2 pound, 
5 pound, 
or 10 pound rock ... head and dead on ... while submerging?  [Image: wall.gif]


It hit the stop sign at 11.8 inches,
and was supposed to go down 10 feet or more.

then I said this about the probe on the surface there:


Quote:If I was an army-brat teenager on 22nd century Mars I would beat the crap out of it with a baseball bat.


Trashing the trash.
Maybe they will get lucky and loosen up the bigger rock that they hit.
Surface conditions often reveal a grading of larger denser rocks -- the deeper you go.
When I go Jade hunting, often a big flat 200 pound jade might be laying flat,
just 6 inches under the surface,
and you might walk over that spot for years and never see it.
Then one year the water changes flow in an odd way,
and washes away the 6 inches of small rocks and gravel over it, 
exposing a 8 inch flat section of the 3 foot long and 1.5 foot wide flat top.
Then it takes me an hour to expose and lift the whole rock up a bit ... with my crowbar.
They might have hit a 200 pound rock,
is what I am saying.
They need an extra robotic arm ... with a 20$ crowbar.
Or they might get lucky and fix their "lack of friction" problem, and get the mole going again,
just to hit another large rock another foot down.

Nonsense technology applied to a mission with insufficient funding.
Making work for ridiculous robotics technology.

Might as well send George Haas and the Ever Ready rabbit there instead,
to burrow that hole down ten feet,
with a shovel, a pick, crowbar, and rabbit with a flashlight to illuminate the rabbit hole.
Then George can call it the Rabbit Hole geoglyph.

Leave NASA on Earth to dig holes with toothless moles.

So if I found this as an artifact relic mission craft sitting on the surface of future Mars ....


Quote:If I was an army  Hi  brat teenager on 22nd century Mars I would beat the crap out of it with a baseball bat.

...
Reply
#43
JULY 5, 2019
Slow progress: NASA's still trying to get inSight's Mole working again
by Evan Gough, Universe Today
[Image: nasasstilltr.gif]Credit: NASA
The InSight lander has been on Mars for 213 Sols on its mission to understand the interior of the red planet. It's armed with a seismometer, a temperature and wind sensor, and other instruments. But it's primary instrument, arguably, is the Mole, or the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3.) And the Mole has been stuck for a while now.

The Mole was developed by the DLR, (German Aerospace Center) and it's job is to hammer its way beneath the surface of Mars, and measure the heat that flows from the planet's interior. It'll help scientists understand how Mars formed, and if it formed from the same material that the Earth and the Moon formed from.
But to do that, it has to penetrate at least three meters, and ideally to its mission depth of 5 meters. But the mole is stuck at about 30 cm (12 inches) and won't go any deeper. At that depth, it can't generate any useful data.
Initially, the InSight team thought that the mole had hit a rock and was blocked. But after analysis and experimentation with a mock-up lander at test-bed facilities, they came up with another explanation: a cavity in the soil.
The mole relies on friction with the rock surrounding it to hammer its way into the ground, and engineers thought that the mole had created a cavity around itself with its hammering motion. Without that friction, the mole will just recoil from the hammering action, and bounce around in the hole, rather than penetrate.
[Image: slowprogress.jpg]

Engineers thought that the mole had hit a rock, shifted to a 15 degree angle, and become stuck. Image Credit: NASA/DLR
[size=undefined]
At the time, Tilman Spohn, Principal Investigator for the HP3 experiment at the DLR Institute of Planetary Research, said "We are now rather sure that the insufficient grip from the soil around the Mole is a problem, because the friction caused by the surrounding regolith under the lower gravitational attraction on Mars is much weaker than we expected."
But they couldn't be sure, because InSight's cameras can't see into the hole.
In early June, the InSight team developed a plan to get HP3 back on track. They decided to use the robotic arm to lift the mole's support structure out of the way, so they could see into the mole's hole.
This was a delicate operation. They unfortunately can't lift the mole itself out of the hole, because the robotic instrument arm can't grasp it. If they were to inadvertently lift the mole out of the hole, they have no way of placing it back in the hole, or in a new hole. It would be game over.
[Image: 1-slowprogress.jpg][/size]

The HP3 model in its test bed in Bremen. Image Credit: DLR.
[size=undefined]
In a recent press release, NASA has announced that they've successfully removed the mole's support structure out of the way, and placed it to the side.

"We've completed the first step in our plan to save the mole," said Troy Hudson, a scientist and engineer with the InSight mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We're not done yet. But for the moment, the entire team is elated because we're that much closer to getting the mole moving again."
Now that the mole's support structure has been moved aside, camera's on the lander's instrument arm are able to see into the hole. And they've confirmed what the InSight team suspected. A small pit has formed around the mole, depriving it of the necessary friction to penetrate deeper.
"The images coming back from Mars confirm what we've seen in our testing here on Earth," said HP3 Project Scientist Mattias Grott of DLR. "Our calculations were correct: This cohesive soil is compacting into walls as the mole hammers."
[Image: 2-slowprogress.jpg][/size]

The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package deployed on the Martian surface. Image Credit: NASA/DLR
[size=undefined]
They've already got a plan to remedy the situation. The robotic instrument arm has a small scoop on the end, and they intend to use that scoop to pat on the hole and compress the soil, hopefully eliminating the cavity.
Even if that is successful, however, the mole might still have hit a rock. Or it might hit a rock on its way down, if it resumes hammering again. The mole was designed to push smaller rocks out of the way, but there's a limit to that. A large rock can block its progress. The site where the mole was placed was chosen very carefully, in hopes of avoiding large rocks, but there's no way to see underground.
There'll be more careful analysis and planning while the team figures out what to do next, and that'll take a while. Once the arm has released the mole's support structure, they'll move in closer with the camera and get a real good look at the hole. Hopefully, the team will find a solution, and the HP3 can complete its mission.
NASA has posted a Q&A on the mole's situation and their attempts to solve the problem.[/size]


[size=undefined]

Explore further
InSight Mars lander uncovers the 'mole'[/size]


[size=undefined]
Provided by Universe Today[/size]


[size=undefined]https://phys.org/news/2019-07-nasa-insight-mole.html[/size]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#44
...

Two weeks later ... less paper on the roll  Tp

There is a "Q&A" link on questions for the mole problems. {bottom of last post}

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8444/common-q...te=insight


Quote:InSight is also a Discovery class  Tp mission, 
meaning it was meant to be more affordable — and to accept more risk —  Naughty
than a flagship NASA mission.


There is a better classification of this mission here:

This is a ... NASA Bullshit Mission.


Quote:Q: Why can't you just pick up the mole  Hi  and move it to another spot?


A: The robotic arm, 
which we inherited from another mission, 
wouldn't be able to pick up the mole. Rofl

We designed HP3's support structure to be grasped by the arm's grapple, 
but the mole was never designed to be handled that way.   Gangup

So even if we could pick up the mole, 

it wouldn't matter where we put it —   Horsepoop

we would still have the same friction problem. 

If the issue is a rock, 
there's no way to guarantee  Arrow   you wouldn't just hit another rock. Rofl


...
Reply
#45
...

Near the bottom of this article is this quote:


Quote:In the meantime, 

the InSight team is trying to fix the lander's "mole,"  Naughty

a tool Whip

that's supposed to dig down 16 feet Rofl

and take Mars' temperature.  Horsepoop

The mole stopped working properly in February.





Next in line is more assumptions with little data from the recent article.
So,
the quote just below is also from the bottom of the article,
in the NASA Disclaimer paragraph titled:
Much More To Learn


Quote:A few dozen Mars quakes aren't enough to reveal the red planet's secrets, however.

So far, 
the signals from Mars quakes have also been too faint to offer information  Tp
about the internal structure of the planet below its crust.
 A person standing on Mars,
would not have been able to feel any of the shaking InSight's tools picked up.

In fact, 

a team of InSight seismologists in Zurich,
had to amplify those seismic signals by a factor of 10 million  Rofl
in order to accurately simulate,
the shaking on the scale of an earthquake.




https://www.businessinsider.com/mars-qua...kes-2019-7

Scientists have detected dozens of potential  Pennywise Mars quakes — 
and the early data suggests
Mars may be less Earth-like than we thought


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Just a brilliant core of scientists in this mission.

They should wear a T-Shirt that says :

The Dead  Tp  Mole Mission

Barely hammered it's way through the width of a toilet roll before it choked on a rock ...

Mission scientists better Pray to Jesus, and pray for resurrection.
If that mole comes back to life,
then Jesus walked on Mars and blessed this piece of shit mission.

Only Jesus can save the Mole.
After all,
he walked on water on ancient Mars.

If I saw that mission probe sitting there on the Martian surface,
I would bless it too. 
I would bless it with a long beer piss straight down into that Mole Hole,
and maybe the hot steaming stream of Heineken, 
would loosen up that rock holding that pathetic mole back.


Bles-sed be those that piss on worthless NASA missions.

You never know ...
Jesus might say ... no way ... and whip out his big ten inch and empty his holy bladder on the Mole.

Holycowsmile


Jesus zipped up and said, "God is Good!"
and
the mole broke through the rock,
because only Jesus's hot and holy piss will work on a broken NASA mission. 

Hi

...
Reply
#46
...



https://www.cnet.com/news/see-nasas-insi...-the-soil/

See  Damned  NASA's InSight Mars lander  Sheep   try to squish the soil  Rofl

Quote:NASA's InSight lander has a perplexing problem. 
The lander's "mole," Whip
 a device that's designed to burrow deep under the planet's surface, 
got stuck pretty quickly after it deployed early in 2019. 

The heat probe just isn't digging like it's supposed to. 
So InSight is patting the ground in an attempt to unstick it.

The InSight team posted a fascinating GIF  Doh

to Twitter on Friday showing the process. 
"I've pressed down next to the 'mole' several times, 
and it's hard to make this unusual soil collapse into the pit," 
the team wrote. 

direct link to NASA twitter feed for gif
https://twitter.com/NASAInSight/status/1162419651139133440


image of ground being "squished"
[Image: ECG-gDZU4AY6Ku7?format=jpg&name=small]





Only Jesus on Mars ... can save this mission and the Mole!

I call upon Jesus!

[Image: giphy.gif]


NASA:

Quote:"I've pressed down next to the 'mole' several times, 
and it's hard to make this unusual soil collapse into the pit," 
the team wrote. 


Jesus  Hi  whip out your big ten inch  LilD
and 
pisssssssssssssss
into 
the pit of the lame NASA Mole. 

The steaming piss stream of hot Holy Water descending onto and into the Martian surface!
shall collapse Bricks
the pit soil,
and restart the Mole !
---------------------------

Quote:NASA and DLR, 
the German Aerospace Center that created the instrument, 
are trying to collapse the soil around the pit the mole has already created, 
hoping to give it something to bite into. 
The mole is meant to burrow as far as 16 feet (5 meters), 
but it hit the snag at a depth of just 12 inches (30 centimeters).

Collapsing the hole and giving the digging instrument more friction might help the cause, 
but it's also possible the mole has hit a rock it just can't get past. 
The InSight team is still optimistic about finding a solution. 

The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Probe is designed to detect the planet's interior temperature. 
InSight's mission is focused on taking the planet's vital signs 
so we can learn more about how rocky planets like Earth and Mars form. 

Even if the mole moves no more, 
InSight will have plenty of other science activities to keep it busy, 
including the monitoring of marsquakes. 

The lander will be out of touch for a couple of weeks, 

but the InSight team will get back to troubleshooting soon. 

In the meantime, 

please enjoy the view of a machine pushing soil around on another planet.  Rofl


I call upon Jesus!
Have Mercy on the failing and botched NASA Moron Mission!

Only Jesus can save this mission and the lowly and lame Mole.
NASA can't do shit for shinola now.
All talk and no traction in the Mole Hole.
Those half wit scientists that put together this goofy Mole Mission ... they need to pray!

I call upon Jesus!

[Image: source.gif]


Pray to Jesus you NASA knucklehead mission scientists
and hope he has a bladder full of red wine,
when he whips out his Big Ten Inch  LilD 
to bless the Mole mission with his personal holy water.

...
Reply
#47
Video 
Jesus Eh?




Quote:He told the crowd that JPL scientists had come up with the name "in a fit of fandom and clever association."




clever association is an attribute of The Quantum Improvisphere.

If your looking for Jesus...you're too late. Arrow The Rock Rolled!  LilD


AUGUST 23, 2019
Rolling Stones get name on little Martian rock that rolled
by Andrew Dalton
[Image: 1-rollingstone.jpg]From left, Ron Wood, Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones perform during their concert at the Rose Bowl, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
There is now a "Rolling Stones Rock" on Mars, and it's giving Mick, Keith and the boys some serious satisfaction.

NASA named a little stone for the legendary rockers after its InSight robotic lander captured it rolling across the surface of Mars last year, and the new moniker was made public at Thursday night's Rolling Stones' concert at the Rose Bowl.
"NASA has given us something we have always dreamed of, our very own rock on Mars. I can't believe it," Mick Jagger told the crowd after grooving through a rendition of "Tumbling Dice." ''I want to bring it back and put it on our mantelpiece."
Robert Downey Jr. announced the name, taking the stage just before the band's set at the Southern California stadium that is just a stone's throw from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which manages InSight.
"Cross-pollinating science and a legendary rock band is always a good thing," the "Iron Man" actor said backstage.
He told the crowd that JPL scientists had come up with the name "in a fit of fandom and clever association."
"Charlie, Ronnie, Keith and Mick—they were in no way opposed to the notion," Downey said, "but in typical egalitarian fashion, they suggested I assist in procuring 60,000 votes to make it official, so that's my mission."
He led the audience in a shout of "aye" before declaring the deed done.
Jagger later said, "I want to say a special thanks to our favorite action man Robert Downey Jr. That was a very nice intro he gave."

'Who will roll away the stone ...
The rock, just a little bigger than a golf ball, was moved by InSight's own thrusters as the robotic lander touched down on Mars on Nov. 26.


Quote:How was Jesus' tomb sealed?--Aleteia
[Image: aleteia.org.ico]https://aleteia.org/2017/04/15/how-did-a-stone-seal-jesus-tomb/
Mark 16:3 describes the scene on Easter Sundaywhen Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Salome visit Jesus' tomb: "They had been saying to one another, 'Who will roll away the stone ...

[Image: 2-rollingstone.jpg]

The logos for the band The Rolling Stones and NASA are displayed side-by-side on video monitors onstage before the Rolling Stones' concert at the Rose Bowl, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. Actor Robert Downey Jr. announced from the stage before the show that NASA has officially named a rock spotted rolling across the surface of Mars by its InSight lander "Rolling Stones Rock." (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

It only moved about 3 feet (0.9 meters), but that's the farthest NASA has seen a rock roll while landing a craft on another planet.



Quote:Tomb of Jesus with Rolling stone - bible.ca
[Image: www.bible.ca.ico]www.bible.ca/archeology/bible-archeology-tombs-burials-Jewish-rolling-stone-Jesus-Christ-resurrection-3-days-Koch-Loculi-ossuary.htm
They also had rolling stone doors to and seals to protect the contents from tampering. The tomb of Helena is typical of the kind of tomb with rolling stone that Jesus of Nazareth was buried in. He would have been placed on a stone slab as pictured below wrapped in white linen cloth. They also had many oil lamp niches in the walls for light. 5.


"I've seen a lot of Mars rocks over my career," Matt Golombek, a JPL geologist who has helped NASA land all its Mars missions since 1997, said in a statement. "This one probably won't be in a lot of scientific papers, but it's definitely one of the coolest."
The Rolling Stones and NASA logos were shown side by side in the run-up to the show as the sun set over the Rose Bowl, leaving many fans perplexed as to what the connection was before it was announced.
The concert had originally been scheduled for spring, before the Stones postponed their No Filter North American tour because Jagger had heart surgery.
The 76-year-old showed no signs of poor health or even his age as he danced, pranced and boogied up and down a long catwalk that extended to the middle of the stadium's field.
He did poke fun at his advanced years.
"It's great to be back at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena," Jagger said. "At least I think we've been here before." (They have, in 1994.)
He also said, "We walked up and down Hollywood Boulevard looking for the Rolling Stones star but couldn't find it." (The band doesn't have one.)
And he took a dig at President Donald Trump's recent talk of acquiring Greenland when introducing his bandmates.
"On the drums," Jagger shouted, "Greenland's new economic adviser, Charlie Watts!"


[size=undefined]

Explore further
InSight captures sunrise and sunset on Mars[/size]


[size=undefined]https://phys.org/news/2019-08-stones-piece-mars.html[/size]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#48
...

If Jesus cannot save the mission ... nobody can.

With NASA,
when your Mars mission fails,
you get an Emmy  Rofl
to sweep the inept and useless Mole under the carpet of science shame,
with a smokescreen of media whitewash.


https://www.cnet.com/news/nasas-insight-...s-an-emmy/
NASA's Insight Lander just won an Emmy


Quote:NASA's Insight Lander is having a rough time on Mars at the minute, 
trying to dislodge its "mole" from martian soil. 
That's the bad  Gangup news.

The good news? The Insight Lander is now an Emmy winner!

The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences on Sunday, 
gave NASA the Outstanding Original Interactive Program award,
for its coverage of the Insight Lander's journey to Mars. 

It was given the award for its tireless coverage across online, social media and TV among other things.


Yea ... the above last line in the quote,
is because they expected their worthless Mole to work.
Funding allowed lame brain scientists to tinker toy together a stupid idea into space mission robotics.
How they could ignore the possibility of hitting a rock under the surface,
is the peak of the pyramid of bullshit in space missions.
Of course,
they still evade the truth,
and continue to try and toilet paper gift  Tp wrap an excuse of unpredictable Martian soil causing the Mole to fail.



Quote:"Congrats to those who contributed to the news, web, education, 
television and social media coverage of this landing on the Red Planet," 
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, 
tweeted in response.


No "congrats" to the scientists who botched the entire mission with the Mole.


Jesus ---> Slap2  <--- NASA mission scientists that designed the Mole

With NASA,
when your Mars mission fails,
you get an Emmy  Rofl
to sweep the inept and uselss Mole under the carpet of science shame,
with a smokescreen of media whitewash.

With NASA,
when your mission team fails to do perform common sense science,
then you get an awards ceremony,
like they gave Marc Rayman,
for burning us THREE TIMES,
at HAMO, 
at LAMO,
and then the extended mission that gave us nothing in better images.


Mission success,
isn't just getting the space craft  there into orbit, or on to the surface.
Mission success,
is making the right decisions to achieve maximum potential of your mission.
Rayman -- Ceres Dawn Team Mission Con-Troll Whip
was having too much fun being a putzy clown.

Might as well give him an Emmy for this:

[Image: hqdefault.jpg]


And after keeping the mission at LAMO,
and not down to a lower orbit to get superior images -- and capture high superior mission potential,
the second worst decision ever made on a NASA mission,
they gave Rayman an awards ceremony.

Might as well give him an Emmy here too.
Bad acting and bad science.

[Image: collier20160610-full.jpg?resize=985%2C774&ssl=1]



New Horizons Fly  Hi Bye of Pluto,
was the worst mission priority decision ever made by NASA.
The mission was hijacked by bad science scientists.

The New Horizons Mission
gets the:
Stu-Burger  Horsepoop Award    {Stu Robbins}

...
Reply
#49
Stu-Burger  [Image: horsepoop.gif] Award 
[Image: red-award-ribbons-badge-2423115.jpg]
Pinning it on him like a red-ribbon champion crater-counter.

Quote:Lol!--- this is write right rite up 2Stu's' alley... Arrow

"We're going to try pressing the side of the scoop against the 
mole, pinning it to the wall of its hole," [Image: 48712349478_203ccfb3cf_o.jpg] said InSight Deputy Principal Investigator Sue Smrekar of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "This might increase friction enough to keep it moving forward when mole hammering resumes."




[Image: nasaspushtos.gif]
NASA's push to save the Mars InSight lander's heat probe
NASA's InSight lander, which is on a mission to explore the deep interior of Mars, positioned its robotic arm this past weekend to assist the spacecraft's self-hammering heat probe. Known as "the mole," the probe has been ...
SPACE EXPLORATION

8 HOURS AGO
Quote:Yea ... the above last line in the quote,
is because they expected their worthless Mole to work.
Funding allowed lame brain scientists to tinker toy together a stupid idea into space mission robotics.
How they could ignore the possibility of hitting a rock under the surface,
is the peak of the pyramid of bullshit in space missions.
Of course,
they still evade the truth,
and continue to try and toilet paper gift  [Image: tp.bmp] wrap an excuse of unpredictable Martian soil causing the Mole to fail.

Pinning and Hole-Driving is hillarious and the only option they have Left: 2Stu-pids don't make a Right Doh

OCTOBER 3, 2019
NASA's push to save the Mars InSight lander's heat probe
[Image: nasaspushtos.gif]NASA InSight's robotic arm will use its scoop to pin the spacecraft's heat probe, or "mole," against the wall of its hole. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA's InSight lander, which is on a mission to explore the deep interior of Mars, positioned its robotic arm this past weekend to assist the spacecraft's self-hammering heat probe. Known as "the mole," the probe has been unable to dig more than about 14 inches (35 centimeters) since it began burying itself into the ground on Feb. 28, 2019.

The maneuver is in preparation for a tactic, to be tried over several weeks, called "pinning."
"We're going to try pressing the side of the scoop against the mole, pinning it to the wall of its hole," said InSight Deputy Principal Investigator Sue Smrekar of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "This might increase friction enough to keep it moving forward when mole hammering resumes."
Whether the extra pressure on the mole will compensate for the unique soil remains an unknown.
Designed to burrow as much as 16 feet (5 meters) underground to record the amount of heat escaping from the planet's interior, the mole needs friction from surrounding soil in order to dig: Without it, recoil from the self-hammering action causes it to simply bounce in place, which is what the mission team suspects is happening now.
While JPL manages the InSight mission for NASA, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) provided the heat probe, which is part of an instrument called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3). Back in June, the team devised a plan to help the heat probe. The mole wasn't designed to be picked up and relocated once it begins digging. Instead, the robotic arm removed a support structure intended to hold the mole steady as it digs into the Martian surface.

Removing the structure allowed the InSight team to get a better look at the hole that formed around the mole as it hammered. It's possible that the mole has hit a rock, but testing by DLR suggested the issue was soil that clumps together rather than falling around the mole as it hammers. Sure enough, the arm's camera discovered that below the surface appears to be 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of duricrust, a kind of cemented soil thicker than anything encountered on other Mars missions and different from the soil the mole was designed for.
"All we know about the soil is what we can see in images InSight sends us," said Tilman Spohn, HP3's principal investigator at DLR. "Since we can't bring the soil to the mole, maybe we can bring the mole to the soil by pinning it in the hole."

Using a scoop on the robotic arm, the team poked and pushed the soil seven times over the summer in an effort to collapse the hole. No such luck. It shouldn't take much force to collapse the hole, but the arm isn't pushing at full strength. The team placed HP3 as far from the lander as possible so that the spacecraft's shadow wouldn't influence the heat probe's temperature readings. As a result, the arm, which wasn't intended to be used this way, has to stretch out and press at an angle, exerting much less force than if the mole were closer.
"We're asking the arm to punch above its weight," said Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu, the lead arm engineer at JPL. "The arm can't push the soil the way a person can. This would be easier if it could, but that's just not the arm we have."
Interplanetary rescue operations aren't new to NASA. The Mars Exploration Rover team helped save Spirit and Opportunity on more than one occasion. Coming up with workable solutions requires an extraordinary amount of patience and planning. JPL has a working replica of InSight to practice arm movements, and it has a working model of the heat probe as well.
Besides pinning, the team is also testing a technique to use the scoop in the way it was originally intended to work: scraping soil into the hole rather than trying to compress it. Both techniques might be visible to the public in raw images that come down from InSight in the near future.




Explore further
InSight Mars lander uncovers the 'mole'



Provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#50
...

This is a funny mission.
It is kind of like the comic relief mission.
Like a mid evening TV comedy.
Scientists monkey wrenching with bogus space mission machinery on Mars.

All these mission problems associated with tinker toy designed robotics,
does keep all the scientists working hard to earn their money.
It must be another low budget "make work" space mission.
Send a metal trash can carrying mission machinery put together with duck tape to Mars,
and keep the scientists busy trying to keep it working.


Quote:Sure enough, 
the arm's camera discovered that below the surface,
appears to be 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of  Uhoh duricrust  Uhoh
a kind of cemented soil Wall
thicker,
than anything encountered on other Mars missions,
and different from the soil the mole was designed for 


The "duricrust" ... could then be the rock Whip
that they hit below the surface.
Duricrust essentially IS rock.
The Mole was not designed to hit rocks,
and if they hit duricrust they hit a big flat rock,
in the form of a thick layer of duricrust.
If the "duricrust" scenario is the problem present,
then,
it may come down to:
how Whip
deep Whip
does the duricrust really go?
On Mars it might be several meters deep,
and the mission team is hoping for pinches of inches.



Quote:Duricrust is a peculiarly Australian term,
used to describe the case-hardened superficial mantle of rock like material,
that outcrops over much of the arid and semi-arid parts of Australia.

It consists of soil or rock,
cemented or replaced either by oxides of silicon,
iron, 
or aluminum,
or by such salts as calcium carbonate or sulfate.


https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/ear.../duricrust


Then there is the continuing mission confusion of what, where, when, and why, they make work. 

Quote:Besides pinning,
the team is also testing a technique,
to use the scoop in the way it was originally intended to work:
scraping soil into the hole,
rather than trying to compress it.


Using a scoop on the robotic arm, 
the team poked and pushed the soil seven times over the summer,
in an effort Toilet

to collapse the hole.


Better call upon Jesus  Hi
Only Jesus,
can bless and collapse the Mole hole.

Any success this mission is blessed with,
will come from the benevolence of Jesus  Holycowsmile as he walks on Mars.

These make work mission scientists need to pray for redemption,
pray to Jesus, 
you sinners!


Quote:It shouldn't take much force to collapse the hole, 
but the arm isn't pushing at full strength.
"We're asking the arm to punch above its weight," 
said Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu, 
the lead arm engineer at JPL. 
"The arm can't push the soil the way a person can. 
This would be easier if it could, 
but that's just not the arm we have."  Doh

The mole wasn't designed to be picked up and relocated once it begins digging. 
Instead, the robotic arm removed a support structure,
intended to hold the mole steady as it digs into the Martian surface.



Duricrust consists of soil or rock,
cemented together,
either by oxides of silicon <--- silcrete
iron <---  ferricrete
or aluminum,
or by such salts as calcium carbonate or sulfate

-------

...

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...Ferricrete

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/a-Gr..._271954287


[Image: a-Gritty-dismantled-layer-at-top-massive...e-with.png]



https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Mass..._275434295


Silcrete layer cap at the top of the outcrop  in Australia

[Image: P096110126Bz-750.jpg]


Ancient cultures made tools out of silcrete.

If this mission hit silcrete or ferricrete in a deep thick layer,
they had better continue to call upon Jesus.

Pray, you mission make work sinners.
...
Reply
#51
Lol!--- this is write right rite up 2Stu's' alley... [Image: arrow.png]
"dinks and donks " [Image: 48712349478_203ccfb3cf_o.jpg] for 2Stu-pids

OCTOBER 1, 2019
NASA lander captures marsquakes, other Martian sounds
by Marcia Dunn
[Image: nasalanderca.jpg]This April 25, 2019 photo made available by NASA shows the InSight lander's dome-covered seismometer, known as SEIS, on Mars. On Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, scientists released an audio sampling of marsquakes and other sounds recorded by the probe. (NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP)
NASA's InSight lander on Mars has captured the low rumble of marsquakes and a symphony of other otherworldly sounds.
Scientists released an audio sampling Tuesday. The sounds had to be enhanced for humans to hear.
InSight's seismometer has detected more than 100 events, but only 21 are considered strong marsquake candidates. 



The rest could be marsquakes—or something else. The French seismometer is so sensitive it can hear the Martian wind as well as movements by the lander's robot arm and other mechanical  Doh "dinks and donks " Doh  as the team calls them.

"It's been exciting, especially in the beginning, hearing the first vibrations from the lander," said Imperial College London's Constantinos Charalambous, who helped provide the audio recordings. "You're imagining what's really happening on Mars as InSight sits on the open landscape," he added in a statement.
InSight arrived at Mars last November and recorded its first seismic rumbling in April.
A German drilling instrument, meanwhile, has been inactive for months. Scientists are trying to salvage the experiment to measure the planet's internal temperature.

The so-called mole is meant to penetrate 16 feet (5 meters) beneath the Martian surface, but has managed barely 1 foot (30 centimeters). Researchers suspect the Martian sand isn't providing the necessary friction for digging, causing the mole to helplessly bounce around rather than burrow deeper, and to form a wide pit around itself.

[Image: nasalanderca.gif]
Clouds drift over the dome-covered seismometer, known as SEIS, belonging to NASA's InSight lander, on Mars. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech



Explore further
InSight's team tries new strategy to help the 'mole'



[b]More information:[/b] soundcloud.com/nasa/quake-sol-173
soundcloud.com/nasa/quake-sol-235
soundcloud.com/nasa/dinks-and-donks-sample
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#52
Once more Nobody Advanced Science Activity to Just Plain Look at where you're going to land BEFORE YOU FRACKING LAND THERE !!!

Fracking idiots them all ... Doh 


Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Morning Light, No sensation to compare to this, suspended animation, state of bliss, I keep my eyes on the circling sky, tongue tied and twisted just and Earth Bound Martian I" Learning to Fly Pink Floyd [Video: https://vimeo.com/144891474]
Reply
#53
Quote:It must be another low budget "make work" space mission.
Send a metal trash can carrying mission machinery put together with duck tape to Mars,
and keep the scientists busy trying to keep it working.
Posted by EA - Sunday, October 6th, 2019, 12:28 am
Lol!--- this is write right rite up 2Stu's' alley... 

improvised 'pinning' like stu's 'twinning'...eye work for you.[Image: arrow.png]

OCTOBER 17, 2019

Mars InSight's 'mole' is moving again
[Image: marsinsights.gif]This GIF shows NASA InSight's heat probe, or "mole," digging about a centimeter (half an inch) below the surface last week. Using a technique called "pinning," InSight recently pressed the scoop on its robotic arm against the self-hammering mole in order to help it dig.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA's InSight spacecraft has used its robotic arm to help its heat probe, known as "the mole," dig nearly 2 centimeters (3/4 of an inch) over the past week. While modest, the movement is significant: Designed to dig as much as 16 feet (5 meters) underground to gauge the heat escaping from the planet's interior, the mole has only managed to partially bury itself since it started hammering in February 2018.

The recent movement is the result of a new strategy, arrived at after extensive testing on Earth, which found that unexpectedly strong soil is holding up the mole's progress. The mole needs friction from surrounding soil in order to move: Without it, recoil from its self-hammering action will cause it to simply bounce in place. Pressing the scoop on InSight's robotic arm against the mole, a new technique called "pinning," appears to provide the probe with the friction it needs to continue digging.
Since Oct. 8, 2019, the mole has hammered 220 times over three separate occasions. Images sent down from the spacecraft's cameras have shown the mole gradually progressing into the ground. It will take more time—and hammering—for the team to see how far the mole can go.
The mole is part of an instrument called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package, or HP3, which was provided by the German Aerospace Center (DLR).
"Seeing the mole's progress seems to indicate that there's no rock blocking our path," said HP3 Principal Investigator Tilman Spohn of DLR. "That's great news! We're rooting for our mole to keep going."
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, leads the InSight mission. JPL has tested the robotic arm's movement using full-scale replicas of InSight and the mole. Engineers continue to test what would happen if the mole were to sink beneath the reach of the robotic arm. If it stops making progress, they might scrape soil on top of the mole, adding mass to resist the mole's recoil.
If no other options exist, they would consider pressing the scoop down directly on the top of the mole while trying to avoid the sensitive tether there; the tether provides power to and relays data from the instrument.
"The mole still has a way to go, but we're all thrilled to see it digging again," said Troy Hudson of JPL, an engineer and scientist who has led the mole recovery effort. "When we first encountered this problem, it was crushing. But I thought, 'Maybe there's a chance; let's keep pressing on.' And right now, I'm feeling giddy."




Explore further
NASA's push to save the Mars InSight lander's heat probe



Provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory



https://phys.org/news/2019-10-mars-insight-mole.html


Quote:Posted by rhw007 - Sunday, October 6th, 2019, 02:26 am
Once more Nobody Advanced Science Activity to Just Plain Look at where you're going to land BEFORE YOU FRACKING LAND THERE !!!

Fracking idiots them all ...



On that Note enjoy looking where insight landed. Arrow


OCTOBER 17, 2019
HiRISE views NASA's InSight and Curiosity on Mars

[Image: hiriseviewsn.jpg]The HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter got its best view yet of the InSight lander on September 23, 2019. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
The HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter recently sent home eye-catching views of the agency's InSight lander and its Curiosity rover.

HiRISE has been monitoring InSight's landing site in the Elysium Planitia region of the Red Planet for changes to the surface, such as dust-devil tracks. Taken on Sept. 23, 2019, at an altitude of 169 miles (272 kilometers) above the surface, the new image is NASA's best view yet of InSight from space. It clearly shows the two circular solar panels on either side of the lander body, spanning 20 feet (six meters) from end to end.
The bright spot on the lower side of the spacecraft is the dome-shaped protective cover over InSight's seismometer. The dark halo surrounding the spacecraft resulted from retrorocket thrusters scouring the surface during landing, while dust devils created the dark streaks that run diagonally across the surface.
Several factors make this image crisper than a set of images released after InSight's November 2018 landing. For one thing, there's less dust in the air this time. Shadows are offset from the lander because this is an oblique view looking west. The lighting was also optimal for avoiding the bright reflections from the lander or its solar panels that have obscured surrounding pixels in other images. However, bright reflections are unavoidable with the seismometer cover just south of the lander because of its dome shape.

[Image: hiriseviewsn.gif]
This animation shows the position of NASA's Curiosity rover as it journeyed through "the clay-bearing unit" on Mars between May 31 and July 20, 2019. The HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took both images. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
[b]Driven by Curiosity[/b]
HiRISE has also been keeping tabs on NASA's Curiosity, which is roughly 373 miles (600 kilometers) from InSight, exploring a region called "the clay-bearing unit."
A GIF released today shows Curiosity as a gray speck as it traveled 1,106 feet (337 meters) from a location within the clay-bearing unit called "Woodland Bay" (top center) to "Sandside Harbour" (bottom center, near the dark sand patch) between May 31 and July 20, 2019.
Look carefully and you can even see the rover's tracks arcing to the right side of the second image.




Explore further
Image: HiRISE spots Curiosity rover at Mars' Woodland Bay



[b]More information:[/b] Find more information about InSight, Curiosity, MRO and HiRISE at:

mars.nasa.gov/insight/
mars.nasa.gov/msl/
mars.nasa.gov/mro/

Provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory




https://phys.org/news/2019-10-hirise-vie...osity.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#54
(05-12-2018, 03:35 AM)Vianova Wrote: ...
I think I was skeptical about this lander from the beginning.
I remember now,
it was those goofy electronic tethers that have to unravel themselves to deploy the instruments.

Looking at this in the last text.


Quote:Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package
The second main instrument is a self-hammering probe that will monitor heat in the planet's subsurface.

The probe will bore down 10 to 16 feet (three to five meters) below the surface,
NASA said, 
15 times deeper than any previous Mars mission.


Well if the tethers unravel with no probelms,
Ok, great,
and the little probe starts to hammer itself down and into the frozen soil.
What happens down maybe two feet, ... 
if the Mole hits a 2 pound, 
5 pound, 
or 10 pound rock ... head and dead on ... while submerging?

The probe HP3
https://mars.nasa.gov/insight/mission/instruments/hp3/

Mounted on the lander deck at launch. 

Upon landing, the lander's arm picks up HP3 and places it on the surface. 

The mole then hammers itself under the surface  

MASS: Just over 6.5 pounds (ab

VOLUME: About 5.3 gallons (20 liters) in total


----------------------------------------------------------------

Check out the tehthers that have to unravel


[Image: insight-35.jpg]


That punk ass mole can't dodge a 5 pound rock


[Image: insight-10.jpg]


nope, nothing can go wrong there



[Image: hp3.png]



Lol   might be able to cook some tortillas or make some pancakes on those hot plates Lol

sorry, but the thing is comical looking.

If I was an army-brat teenager on 22nd century Mars I would beat the crap out of it with a baseball bat.

We really need some manned missions to Mars.
For all of NASA's successes there with Rovers and such,
they still failed.
It seems like the last 50 years were just a giant delay tactic in space exploration.

And now I don't even want to go. Spaceship travel sucks for the next 150-250 years.

Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the Star Gate to open.

See how we fly, like Lucy in the Sky ...

If it isn't by Star Gate, or some such rapid transit system,
it's not worth traveling there.

Quote:Mounted on the lander deck at launch. 

Upon landing, the lander's arm picks up HP3 and places it on the surface. 

The mole Naughty  then hammers itself under the surface  Rofl  


...
Prescient Present Post!

NASA's InSight spacecraft has used its robotic arm to help its heat probe, known as "the mole," dig nearly 2 centimeters (3/4 of an inch) over the past week. While modest, the movement is significant: Designed to dig as much as 16 feet (5 meters) underground to gauge the heat escaping from the planet's interior, the mole has only managed to partially bury itself since it started hammering in February 2018.


The recent movement is the result of a new strategy, arrived at after extensive testing on Earth, which found that unexpectedly strong soil is holding up the mole's progress. The mole needs friction from surrounding soil in order to move: Without it, recoil from its self-hammering action will cause it to simply bounce in place. Pressing the scoop on InSight's robotic arm against the mole, a new technique called "pinning," appears to provide the probe with the friction it needs to continue digging.
Since Oct. 8, 2019, the mole has hammered 220 times over three separate occasions. Images sent down from the spacecraft's cameras have shown the mole gradually progressing into the ground. It will take more time—and hammering—for the team to see how far the mole can go.
The mole is part of an instrument called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package, or HP3, which was provided by the German Aerospace Center (DLR).
"Seeing the mole's progress seems to indicate that there's no rock blocking our path," said HP3 Principal Investigator Tilman Spohn of DLR. "That's great news! We're rooting for our mole to keep going."  Arrow EditsmilyMars InSight's 'mole' is moving again

by Jet Propulsion Laboratory
https://phys.org/news/2019-10-mars-insight-mole.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#55
And what is going to happen when they pull the robotic "plate" out from the hole and it pulls ALL the electronic cord 'snags' on the shovel the mole has been using as a hammer; and BOOM another LOST opportunity. Another NASA Frack=up.

DIDN'T THE MRO HiRISE take RADAR UNDERGROUND MEASUREMENTS with EVERY SINGLE IMAGE ???

Yep it does...so why did NASA not even LOOK to see if the landing zone HAD solid soil, dunes, or quicksand ????

Where is the RADAR data for this landing spot?

Did ANYBODY within the NASA/JPL/ESA system even bother to FRACKING LOOK at the DATA ???

NO !!!

Same thing with both the #2020CydoniaRover and Europe and Russia's Rover are ALL going to the WRONG spots to find something NEW and UNKNOWN.

That little white card showing the Uncurious-Curiosity rover WHERE to STOP and it did.  THEN ... without moving ... the MASTCAM was supposed to take a FULL COLOR 360 from THAT stopping point.  Read the the steps that "supposed" to take place AS ordered in the Mission Plan.  Remember the nice JPL folks who got back to me on this ?

https://mycommonsenseparty.com/MSSS-NASA...-2020.html

They are going to do the same thing with their rovers.

Sinking into a spot where there is NO real ROCK at "sea level" on Mars other than Quicksand.

Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Morning Light, No sensation to compare to this, suspended animation, state of bliss, I keep my eyes on the circling sky, tongue tied and twisted just and Earth Bound Martian I" Learning to Fly Pink Floyd [Video: https://vimeo.com/144891474]
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