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Freak When See 333m Frequency Focus on the eye in the great pyramid
#1
Study reveals the Great Pyramid of Giza can
[Image: arrow.png]  focus electromagnetic energy
July 31, 2018 by Anastasia Komarova, ITMO University
An international research group has applied methods of theoretical physics to investigate the electromagnetic response of the Great Pyramid to radio waves.
Quote:Wireless telegraphy and wireless telephony an elementary treatise
https://books.google.ca/books?isbn=1177712318
A.E. Kennelly - History
Spireri of Electromagnetic W acres The speed of sound waves in air we have seen to be in the neighborhood of 333 meters per second...

Sounds like it looks
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Propagation of electromagnetic waves inside the pyramids of Cheops at different lengths of radio waves (from 200 to 400 meters). The black rectangular position of the so-called King's Chamber. Credit: ITMO University, Laser Zentrum Hannover

An international research group has applied methods of theoretical physics to investigate the electromagnetic response of the Great Pyramid to radio waves. Scientists predicted that under resonance conditions, the pyramid can concentrate electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers and under the base. The research group plans to use these theoretical results to design nanoparticles capable of reproducing similar effects in the optical range. Such nanoparticles may be used, for example, to develop sensors and highly efficient solar cells. The study was published in the Journal of Applied Physics.



While Egyptian pyramids are surrounded by many myths and legends, researchers have little scientifically reliable information about their physical properties. Physicists recently took an interest in how the Great Pyramid would interact with electromagnetic waves of a resonant length. Calculations showed that in the resonant state, the pyramid can concentrate electromagnetic energy in the its internal chambers as well as under its base, where the third unfinished chamber is located.

These conclusions were derived on the basis of numerical modeling and analytical methods of physics. The researchers first estimated that resonances in the pyramid can be induced by radio waves with a length ranging from 200 to 600 meters. Then they made a model of the electromagnetic response of the pyramid and calculated the extinction cross section. This value helps to estimate which part of the incident wave energy can be scattered or absorbed by the pyramid under resonant conditions. Finally, for the same conditions, the scientists obtained the electromagnetic field distribution inside the pyramid.

In order to explain the results, the scientists conducted a multipole analysis. This method is widely used in physics to study the interaction between a complex object and electromagnetic field. The object scattering the field is replaced by a set of simpler sources of radiation: multipoles. The collection of multipole radiation coincides with the field scattering by an entire object. Therefore, knowing the type of each multipole, it is possible to predict and explain the distribution and configuration of the scattered fields in the whole system.

The Great Pyramid attracted the researchers while they were studying the interaction between light and dielectric nanoparticles. The scattering of light by nanoparticles depends on their size, shape and refractive index of the source material. Varying these parameters, it is possible to determine the resonance scattering regimes and use them to develop devices for controlling light at the nanoscale.

"Egyptian pyramids have always attracted great attention. We as scientists were interested in them as well, so we decided to look at the Great Pyramid as a particle dissipating radio waves resonantly. Due to the lack of information about the physical properties of the pyramid, we had to use some assumptions. For example, we assumed that there are no unknown cavities inside, and the building material with the properties of an ordinary limestone is evenly distributed in and out of the pyramid. With these assumptions made, we obtained interesting results that can find important practical applications," says Dr. Sc. Andrey Evlyukhin, scientific supervisor and coordinator of the research.

Now, the scientists plan to use the results to reproduce similar effects at the nanoscale. "Choosing a material with suitable electromagnetic properties, we can obtain pyramidal nanoparticles with a promise for practical application in nanosensors and effective solar cells," says Polina Kapitainova, Ph.D., a member of the Faculty of Physics and Technology of ITMO University.
Explore further: Archeologists open burial chambers in Sudanese pyramid

More information: Mikhail Balezin et al, Electromagnetic properties of the Great Pyramid:  First multipole resonances and energy concentration, Journal of Applied Physics (2018). DOI: 10.1063/1.5026556


10...9...8...7...6...5...4...3...2...1...
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[Image: aa5.jpg] Rite where we Lift-off!

Journal reference: Journal of Applied Physics [/url]
Provided by: [url=https://phys.org/partners/itmo-university/]ITMO University



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-07-reveals-gr...s.html#jCp

 
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Holy electromagnetic hocus-pocus focus-locus

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Focii= 333m  =Locii

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Freak when see Frequency


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  I feel like eye initiated @~333
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#2
There has been several news articles about this in recent days.  Also this pyramid structure is also mentioned in two books I just finished reading, Secrets of the Soil & Secret Life of Plants, both talk about "energetic energies" from the ENTIRE Cosmos has a DIRECT effect on ALL life energies.

I'll be putting a New 'Reading List' on my main site with links to Amazon to buy them.  Some of these secrets in the life of plants are just amazing. What to grow GIANT buds the size of watermelons?  The secrets and directions are there in these two books.

Just had car wreck totaled my car got another new one, bit upset; but heartbeat to heartbeat I move forward.

As Janis said: "Don't let worry about tomorrow take away from the NOW" Janis Joplin.

Would like to put Christmas Lights into Pyramid Shape in Bedrooms and Grow room.

Bob... Ninja Assimilated
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
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#3
While your @ it...
put this in your pipe and smoke it.
put this in an incredible and edible!

Grow-op Arrow

When the seed becomes a plant, it has 48 hours to survive
August 2, 2018, University of Geneva


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Proplastid (yellow) in a seed embryo cell. The wall (brown) separates two cells, their vacuoles (light grey) and their cytoplasm (blue). Credit: Sylvain Loubéry, UNIGE
During germination, the embryo within a seed must develop into a young seedling capable of photosynthesis in less than 48 hours. During this time, it relies solely on its internal reserves, which are quickly consumed. It must therefore rapidly create functional chloroplasts, cellular organelles that will enable it to produce sugars to ensure its survival. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University of Neuchâtel (UniNE), Switzerland, have revealed in the journal Current Biology the key elements that control the formation of chloroplasts from proplastids, hitherto poorly studied organelles. Such a mechanism ensures a rapid transition to autonomous growth, as soon as the seed decides to germinate.



The surprising propagation and diversification of flowering plants in terrestrial environments are mainly due to the appearance of seeds during evolution. The embryo, which is dormant, is encapsulated and protected in a very resistant structure, which facilitates its dispersion. At this stage, it cannot perform photosynthesis and, during germination, it will thus consume the nutritive reserves stored in the seed. This process induces the transformation of a strong embryo into a fragile seedling. "This is a critical stage in the life of a plant, which is closely regulated, notably by the growth hormone gibberellic acid (GA). The production of this hormone is repressed when external conditions are unfavorable," explains Luis Lopez-Molina, Professor at the Department of Botany and Plant Biology of the UNIGE Faculty of Science.

Import proteins submitted to the cell shredder

The awakening of the embryo causes the differentiation of its proplastids into chloroplasts, biological factories capable of producing sugar thanks to photosynthesis. "Thousands of different proteins must be imported into the developing chloroplasts, and this process can only take place in the presence of a protein called TOC159. If it is lacking, the plant will be depleted in chloroplasts and will remain albino," explains Felix Kessler, director of the Plant Physiology Lab and vice-rector of the UniNE.

How does the seed decide whether to keep the embryo in a protected state or, on the contrary, to take a chance and let it germinate? "We have discovered that, as long as GA is suppressed, a mechanism is set up, which ensures that TOC159 proteins are transported to the cellular waste bin in order to be degraded," explains Venkatasalam Shanmugabalaji, researcher within the Neuchâtel group and first author of the study. In addition, other proteins needed for photosynthesis, of which TOC159 facilitates importation, suffer the same fate.

A high-performance biomechanism

When external conditions become favorable for germination, the GA concentration increases in the seed. The biologists discovered that high concentrations of this hormone indirectly block the degradation of TOC159 proteins. The latter can therefore be inserted into the membrane of the proplastids and enable the import of photosynthetic proteins cargoes, which also escape the cellular waste bin.

The genesis of the first functional chloroplasts, implemented in less than 48 hours, therefore ensures a rapid transition from a growth depending on the embryo's reserves to an autonomous development. This high-performance mechanism contributes to the survival of the seedling in an inhospitable environment, in which it will have to face many challenges.

 Explore further: Study uncovers how seeds are kept in dormancy until the appearance of favorable conditions for germination

More information: Current Biology (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.06.006


Journal reference: Current Biology [/url]
Provided by:
University of Geneva


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-08-seed-hours...e.html#jCp




New process in root development discovered
July 30, 2018, Institute of Science and Technology Austria


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Root cap peeling off at the tip of an Arabidopsis root. Credit: IST Austria/Ivan Kulik
As the plant root grows, a root cap protects its fragile tip. Every few hours, the old cap is lost and a new one replaces it. This has puzzled scientists: How do cells at the tip know when to die, and how do cells further back know to divide and form a new layer, especially as these cells are several cell rows apart?



Researchers at the University of Oslo and the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now partly solved this communication problem. As they write in today's edition of Nature Plants, the researchers have, for the first time, observed regular cycles of root tip loss and regrowth in real time. In doing so, they uncovered the signal and receptor that coordinate this process.

The group of Reidunn Aalen at the University of Oslo, with postdoc and first author Chun-Lin Shi, discovered the signal and receptor that mediate communication at the root tip. They found that cells in the root cap secrete a small peptide, called IDL1. This peptide diffuses through the root tip. Cells at the root apical meristem, which divide to form a new root cap, have a receptor protein, called HSL2, which perceives the signal peptide IDL1. By this mechanism, the outer root cap cells that are shed and the inner cells that divide to replace them communicate.

Loss of root cap observed for first time

Jiri Friml's group at IST Austria, including former postdoc Daniel von Wangenheim and intern Ivan Kulik, observed, for the first time, how plants shed their root caps. With a laser scanning microscope that was flipped on its side—a method the research group previously developed and that led to the production the winning video in last year's "Nikon Small World in Motion Competition" as well as to the discovery of a new role of auxin in the response to gravity— was able see root cap loss in real-time over days.

Root cap loss is a slow process—root caps are lost at a rate of about one every 18 hours. "Because root cap loss and replacement is slow, you cannot observe it under a normal microscope set-up", Jiri Friml explains. With the flipped microscope, Kulik and von Wangenheim could observe root growth over three days and see the periodicity of cell death and root cap peeling, as Jiri Friml describes: "Our vertical microscope set-up and automatic tracking allowed us to observe how root caps are lost in natural conditions. These tools enabled us to see how root cap loss actually happens and how the cells further back divide. "

Friml's group compared how wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants loose and replace their root cap with how this process occurs in mutant plants, provided by the Aalen group. They found that in plants in which communication through IDL1 and HSL2 is disrupted, root cap cells accumulate at the tip rather than peeling off. "When the signaling doesn't work, the cell death and rebirth is not coordinated and cells hang around much longer at the tip than they should", Friml explains.

The vertical microscope and TipTracker software developed by Robert Hauschield from the IST Austria imaging facility was essential for this work, Kulik says: "Of course, roots grow. So while you image a root in the confocal microscope, the root tip would eventually grow out of the field of vision. With the TipTracker, the microscope compares the root tip's location between images and automatically adjusts the objective's position, so that root tips can be followed even over several days."

 Explore further: New mechanism for the plant hormone auxin discovered

More information: Chun-Lin Shi et al, The dynamics of root cap sloughing in Arabidopsis is regulated by peptide signalling, Nature Plants (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41477-018-0212-z


Journal reference: Nature Plants [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: Institute of Science and Technology Austria
 

Read more at: [url=https://phys.org/news/2018-07-root.html#jCp]https://phys.org/news/2018-07-root.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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