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all up to date and such... again
#1
Just updated the forum... it's such a breeze now, almost automatic

Great change from the past with the db drops and failed plug-ins etc

Horsepoop
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#2
...
Easy work is always good to encounter,
especially with computer activities.
No stress computer reality !

We moved a 220 pound rock that I had hidden in the woods,
down a long rock bar, about 100 yards. 
The top of the rock bar had a flat area before the forest,
paved with river overflow sand and gravel.
Dollies with inflatable wheels did the trick,
the wheels do not sink into the sand.
You have to take your dolly in and have inner tubes inserted,
and they stay inflated forever.

Then bridge the rock across a narrow steep drainage with a plywood ramp,
then up two short steep slopes, about 45 feet,
with other methods.
Used Rope Come Alongs to ramp it up into the truck.

Point being, work like that always has a problem,
and shit can go haywire suddenly.
This extraction went real nice and easy peasy as it can get.

second point being,
I would rather have the rock bar work and big rock extractions go haywire and be a bitch,
than have,
computer problems Whip

Easy peasy is the best computer reality, no problems, no viruses, no bullshit, Nonono

...
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#3
amen to that! I've had much computer/software frustration in my life- I'd rather go with you and have a shit day hauling big rocks out the woods...
(though that actually sounds pretty damn cool)
On a satellite I ride. Nothing down below can hide.
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#4
That does sound cool...Like old school megalith builders

Cyber headaches aren't the same as normal wear and tear days.

Couldn't you just figure out itz negative mass?

Clarifying effects of negative mass
November 26, 2018, FLEET

[Image: clarifyingef.jpg]
LHS, simple, ‘positive mass’ relationship: the mass of the ball remains stable independent of the kick. RHS, ‘kick-dependent’ mass, mass of ball is dependent on force of the kick. Credit: FLEET
A FLEET study led by University of Queensland's David Colas clarifies recent studies of negative mass, investigating the strange phenomenon of self-interference.




When we think of 'mass," we usually consider the 'inertial' mass – the resistance of a body to acceleration due to an applied force.

For a moving object, its mass is then a simple relationship between momentum applied to it, and the velocity it acquires.

However, in some situations, this relationship is not simply proportional and can depend on the impulse applied to the object. Physicists then talk about effective mass, which can even be negative.

In such case, an object would move in a completely non-intuitive way when acted on by a force.

"Imagine a soccer ball, you give it a first kick to get closer to the goal, you then give it an extra kick to score but instead of accelerating, the ball slows down! You're a bit puzzled, so you decide to kick the ball even harder, and it now moves towards your foot and not away from it," explains lead author of the UQ study, Dr. David Colas.

Negative masses can be achieved experimentally at the particle level in various systems, for example using holes within semiconductors, by coupling light to matter in microcavities creating "exciton-polariton," or in atomic ultracold atomic gases under the form of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).

"Negative-Mass Effects in Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates" was published in Physics Review Letters in July.

[Image: 1-clarifyingef.jpg]
Self-interference principle illustrated. The wave function represents the probability to find the particles at a given position. As the gas expands, fringes in the density appear, due to the self-interference effect. Credit: FLEET
The UQ theoretical research expanded upon an earlier study at Washington State University demonstrating a negative mass effect in the expansion of an atomic BEC, nicely illustrating the versatility and great tunability of this platform.

In their study, the UQ researchers have clarified the effects associated to the different types of negative mass and identified the striking "self-interfering effect" in the atomic condensate, which had been originally predicted for exciton-polaritons.

This builds a comprehensive picture of the 'self-interfering effect' observed in the WSU experiment but also shows how the interactions can assist and trigger the present mechanism.

Thomas Young's 1801 double-slit experiment demonstrating matter wave interference was one the first observation of a quantum effect. Individual particles are sent on a screen with two slits are displaying interference as they go through it, exactly like waves. With an ultra-cold atomic gas, one can create the same kind of interference with the particles only, without the need of a screen and slits, simply by affecting their effective mass.



"To carry on with the soccer ball analogy, imagine that if you kick it too hard, you will squeeze it against your foot for a bit. When the ball leaves your boot, it re-expands and you see that the front part of the ball will eventually travel slower that its bottom part. The ball then interferes with itself" continues Dr. David Colas.

The WUS reported that negative mass effect can halt the free expansion of a BEC and lead to fringes in the density. The UQ study showed this was caused by self-interference of the wave packet, arising when certain mass parameters characterising the system become negative.

Negative mass effects can come out under different form, such as self-interference. But one of the most striking one is the backward propagation for a positive impulse: the hypothetical soccer ball that accelerates towards the kicker's boot, not away from it.

The UQ researchers show that this fascinating regime would be more achievable in atomic BECs, than with exciton-polaritons, opening the way to interesting new research paths.

Clarification of the type of mass that is responsible for each observed phenomena will avoid common misinterpretations about negative mass. Such clarification will help get negative-mass research back on track.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Physicists create 'negative mass'

More information: David Colas et al. Negative-Mass Effects in Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates, Physical Review Letters (2018). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.121.055302 

Journal reference: Physical Review Letters


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-effects-negative-mass.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#5
Keith's positive mass macrocosm @ all Ma'at @ that!

All is good in the Multiverse now.


Albert Einstein provided the first hint of the dark universe exactly 100 years ago, when he discovered a parameter in his equations known as the 'cosmological constant," which we now know to be synonymous with dark energy. Einstein famously called the cosmological constant his 'biggest blunder," although modern astrophysical observations prove that it is a real phenomenon. In notes dating back to 1918, Einstein described his cosmological constant, writing that 'a modification of the theory is required such that "empty space" takes the role of gravitating negative masses which are distributed all over the interstellar space." It is therefore possible that Einstein himself predicted a negative-mass-filled universe.

RE: all up to date and such... again
Smooth like a Fluid that writes itself into -existence.
Quote:Thread Review (Newest First)
Posted by EA - Thursday, November 29th, 2018, 12:44 am
That does sound cool...Like old school megalith builders

Cyber headaches aren't the same as normal wear and tear days.

Couldn't you just figure out itz negative mass?

For example, a date Anno Domini (A.D.) 2018 becomes Anno Lucis (A.L.) 6018



Today is now  Anno Einstein (A.E.) 100                        all up to date and such...



Bringing balance(Ma'at) to the universe: New theory could explain missing 95 percent of the cosmos
December 5, 2018, University of Oxford

[Image: darkmatter.jpg]
Dark matter map of KiDS survey region (region G12). Credit: KiDS survey
Scientists at the University of Oxford may have solved one of the biggest questions in modern physics, with a new paper unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single phenomenon: a fluid which possesses 'negative mass." If you were to push a negative mass, it would accelerate towards you. This astonishing new theory may also prove right a prediction that Einstein made 100 years ago.




Our current, widely recognised model of the Universe, called LambdaCDM, tells us nothing about what dark matter and dark energy are like physically. We only know about them because of the gravitational effects they have on other, observable matter.

This new model, published today in Astronomy and Astrophysics, by Dr. Jamie Farnes from the Oxford e-Research Centre, Department of Engineering Science, offers a new explanation. Dr. Farnes says: "We now think that both dark matter and dark energy can be unified into a fluid which possesses a type of 'negative gravity," repelling all other material around them. Although this matter is peculiar to us, it suggests that our cosmos is symmetrical in both positive and negative qualities."

The existence of negative matter had previously been ruled out as it was thought this material would become less dense as the Universe expands, which runs contrary to our observations that show dark energy does not thin out over time. However, Dr. Farnes' research applies a 'creation tensor," which allows for negative masses to be continuously created. It demonstrates that when more and more negative masses are continually bursting into existence, this negative mass fluid does not dilute during the expansion of the cosmos. In fact, the fluid appears to be identical to dark energy.

Dr. Farnes's theory also provides the first correct predictions of the behaviour of dark matter halos. Most galaxies are rotating so rapidly they should be tearing themselves apart, which suggests that an invisible 'halo' of dark matter must be holding them together. The new research published today features a computer simulation of the properties of negative mass, which predicts the formation of dark matter halos just like the ones inferred by observations using modern radio telescopes.

Albert Einstein provided the first hint of the dark universe exactly 100 years ago, when he discovered a parameter in his equations known as the 'cosmological constant," which we now know to be synonymous with dark energy. Einstein famously called the cosmological constant his 'biggest blunder," although modern astrophysical observations prove that it is a real phenomenon. In notes dating back to 1918, Einstein described his cosmological constant, writing that 'a modification of the theory is required such that "empty space" takes the role of gravitating negative masses which are distributed all over the interstellar space." It is therefore possible that Einstein himself predicted a negative-mass-filled universe.

Dr. Farnes says: "Previous approaches to combining dark energy and dark matter have attempted to modify Einstein's theory of general relativity, which has turned out to be incredibly challenging. This new approach takes two old ideas that are known to be compatible with Einstein's theory—negative masses and matter creation—and combines them together.

"The outcome seems rather beautiful: dark energy and dark matter can be unified into a single substance, with both effects being simply explainable as positive mass matter surfing on a sea of negative masses."

Proof of Dr. Farnes's theory will come from tests performed with a cutting-edge radio telescope known as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), an international endeavour to build the world's largest telescope in which the University of Oxford is collaborating.

Dr. Farnes adds: "There are still many theoretical issues and computational simulations to work through, and LambdaCDM has a nearly 30 year head start, but I'm looking forward to seeing whether this new extended version of LambdaCDM can accurately match other observational evidence of our cosmology. If real, it would suggest that the missing 95% of the cosmos had an aesthetic solution: we had forgotten to include a simple minus sign."

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Dark matter clusters could reveal nature of dark energy

More information: J. S. Farnes. A unifying theory of dark energy and dark matter: Negative masses and matter creation within a modified LambdaCDM framework, Astronomy & Astrophysics (2018). DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201832898 , https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.07962

Bizarre 'dark fluid' with negative mass could dominate the universe – what my research suggests 

Journal reference: Astronomy and Astrophysics [Image: img-dot.gif][Image: img-dot.gif] Astronomy & Astrophysics [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: University of Oxford



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-universe-t...s.html#jCp





Vianova...

If Sum-How? we can figure out how to haul heavy stones and heavy furniture with minus -mass.

Then Bob Lazar won't need to back-engineer and retro-science this phenom.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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