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Little Shop of Horrors: A Moving Plot of an other-world's unmanned land...
#16
Quote:Unhooking the pressurized carbon dioxide supply from these leaves means that they must have a way to collect and concentrate carbon dioxide from the air to drive their artificial photosynthetic reactions.

Arrow  Send it to Mars you Genius  Gangup


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*satire 'plant-dude' scientist image...lol!

singh and his colleague Aditya Prajapati, a graduate student in his lab, proposed solving this problem by encapsulating a traditional artificial leaf inside a transparent capsule made of a semi-permeable membrane of quaternary ammonium resin and filled with water.  Doh  The membrane allows water from inside to evaporate out when warmed by sunlight. As water passes out through the membrane, it selectively pulls in carbon dioxide from the air.
 
If a plant can be a bio-electric hybrid...what else can it be hacked with?


To Supplant.
Sending life back home to Cydonia.

With a sentient natural/artificial A.I. self sustaining weeder seeder that can edit itz own genome as easily as it edits itz software.
Self Replicating Bio-hardware that can change the atmosphere to oxygen and can use sunlight or the frozen night to power anu biosphere.
That will end the planet's torpor.

Moving artificial leaves out of the lab and into the air

February 12, 2019, University of Illinois at Chicago

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An artificial, bio-inspired leaf. Carbon dioxide (red and black balls) enter the leaf as water (white and red balls) evaporates from the bottom of the leaf. An artificial photosystem (purple circle at the center of the leaf) made of a light absorber coated with catalysts converts carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and converts water to oxygen (shown as double red balls) using sunlight. Credit: Meenesh Singh
Artificial leaves mimic photosynthesis—the process whereby plants use water and carbon dioxide from the air to produce carbohydrates using energy from the sun. But even state-of-the-art artificial leaves, which hold promise in reducing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, only work in the laboratory because they use pure, pressurized carbon dioxide from tanks.


Mars atmosphere basically. Pennywise

But now, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have proposed a design solution that could bring artificial leaves out of the lab and into the environment. Their improved leaf, which would use carbon dioxide—a potent greenhouse gas—from the air, would be at least 10 times more efficient than natural leaves at converting carbon dioxide to fuel. Their findings are reported in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

"So far, all designs for artificial leaves that have been tested in the lab use carbon dioxide from pressurized tanks. In order to implement successfully in the real world, these devices need to be able to draw carbon dioxide from much more dilute sources, such as air and flue gas, which is the gas given off by coal-burning power plants," said Meenesh Singh, assistant professor of chemical engineering in the UIC College of Engineering and corresponding author on the paper.

Unhooking the pressurized carbon dioxide supply from these leaves means that they must have a way to collect and concentrate carbon dioxide from the air to drive their artificial photosynthetic reactions.

Singh and his colleague Aditya Prajapati, a graduate student in his lab, proposed solving this problem by encapsulating a traditional artificial leaf inside a transparent capsule made of a semi-permeable membrane of quaternary ammonium resin and filled with water. The membrane allows water from inside to evaporate out when warmed by sunlight. As water passes out through the membrane, it selectively pulls in carbon dioxide from the air. The artificial photosynthetic unit inside the capsule is made up of a light absorber coated with catalysts that convert the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, which can be siphoned off and used as a basis for the creation of various synthetic fuels. Oxygen is also produced and can either be collected or released into the surrounding environment.

"By enveloping traditional artificial leaf technology inside this specialized membrane, the whole unit is able to function outside, like a natural leaf," Singh said.

According to their calculations, 360 leaves, each 1.7 meters long and 0.2 meters wide, would produce close to a half-ton of carbon monoxide per day that could be used as the basis for synthetic fuels. Three hundred and sixty of these artificial leaves covering a 500-meter square area would be able to reduce carbon dioxide levels by 10 percent in the surrounding air within 100 meters of the array in one day.

"Our conceptual design uses readily available materials and technology, that when combined can produce an artificial leaf that is ready to be deployed outside the lab where it can play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere," Singh said.

Explore further: Converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide using water, electricity

More information: Aditya Prajapati et al, Assessment of Artificial Photosynthetic Systems for Integrated Carbon Capture and Conversion, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering (2019). DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b04969 

Provided by: University of Illinois at Chicago

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-02-artificial...r.html#jCp


The optical compass developed by the scientists is sensitive to the sky's polarized ultraviolet radiation. Using this "celestial compass," AntBot measures its heading with 0.4 degrees of precision in clear or cloudy weather. The navigation precision achieved with these minimal sensors proves that bio-inspired robotics has immense capacity for innovation.


FEBRUARY 13, 2019

The first walking robot that moves without GPS

by CNRS

[Image: thefirstwalk.jpg]Antbot, the first walking robot that moves without GPS. Credit: Julien Dupeyroux, ISM (CNRS/AMU)
Desert ants are extraordinary solitary navigators. Researchers at CNRS and Aix-Marseille University, in the Institut des Sciences du Mouvement—Étienne Jules Marey (ISM), were inspired by ants as they designed AntBot, the first walking robot that can explore its environment randomly and navigate home automatically without GPS or mapping. This work, published in Science Robotics, opens up new strategies for navigation in autonomous vehicles and robotics.

Human eyes are insensitive to polarized light and ultraviolet radiation, but that is not the case for ants, who use it to locate themselves in space. Cataglyphis desert ants in particular can cover several hundreds of meters in direct sunlightin the desert to find food, then return in a straight line to the nest without getting lost. And they are most active during times of day when heat would make pheromone trails evaporate. Their extraordinary navigation talent relies on orienting themselves using the sky's polarized light, and measuring the distancecovered by counting steps and incorporating the rate of movement relative to the sun measured optically by their eyes. Distance and heading are the two combined pieces of information that allow them to return directly to the nest.
AntBot, the new robot designed by CNRS and Aix-Marseille University (AMU) researchers at ISM, copies the desert ants' exceptional navigation capacities. It is equipped with an optical compass to determine its heading by means of polarized light, and an optical movement sensor directed to the sun to measure the distance covered. Armed with this information, AntBot can explore its environment and to return on its own to its base with precision of up to one centimeter after having covered a total distance of 14 meters. Weighing only 2.3 kg, this robot has six feet for increased mobility, allowing it to move in complex environments where deploying wheeled robots and drones can be complicated, including disaster areas and rugged terrain.
The optical compass developed by the scientists is sensitive to the sky's polarized ultraviolet radiation. Using this "celestial compass," AntBot measures its heading with 0.4 degrees of precision in clear or cloudy weather. The navigation precision achieved with these minimal sensors proves that bio-inspired robotics has immense capacity for innovation.

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Desert ants found to have dual navigation systems
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Concept gains motility.
Ant-bot plant-pot-bot future suture fusion allusion. LilD
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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RE: Little Shop of Horrors - by EA - 12-07-2018, 10:35 PM
RE: Little Shop of Horrors - by EA - 12-22-2018, 10:00 PM
RE: Little Shop of Horrors: A Moving Plot of an other-world's unmanned land... - by EA - 02-13-2019, 10:16 PM

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