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EA...question
#1
Several years ago you posted on one of my threads about some substance (Paint?) that would produce a Fluorescent green. I'm flocking a brand new batch of duck decoys. I can't seem to locate it in the posts. Can you remember, and post a link to it.
I know it's years ago, but if not too much trouble I'd appreciate it.
Thanks
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#2
Actually, two weeks ago I recalled that thought and gave that same advice to one of my clients.
He was a sportsman and I asked if he duck-hunted and hell ya...blah,bah,blah I described the paint.

I said that due to the difference of refraction that  'non-refracting barbules' in bird-feathers produce or reduce? an:iridescence 

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSedC6KqymGoizEq_16PXJ...cdoZC6q0xH]
Quote:ir·i·des·cent
Dictionary result for iridescent

/ˌirəˈdes(ə)nt/
adjective

  1. showing luminous colors that seem to change when seen from different angles.
    "the drake's head has an iridescent purple sheen"
    synonyms:
    shimmeringshimmeryglitteringsparklingcoruscatingdazzlingshininggleamingglowinglustrousscintillatingdancingopalescentopalineMore







Bird Vision Iridescent Metallic Greenhead 1 pint
[Image: Iridescent_Metallic_Greenhead_1.jpg]
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  • Model: Iridescent_Metallic_Greenhead_1
  • Shipping Weight: 1lbs
  • Manufactured by: Reel Wings Decoy Co.
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Arrow Do-it-yourself ducky-Decoy-decko: My

If you can just pulverise  either a green-glass bottle or clear-glass(not sure wich would work best -if at all-) into an ultra-fine powder and then hit it with a torch to make micro-beads of glass and just "Add" that to your usual grean paint it may also simulate the effect.

Happy Hunting.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#3
Quote:Posted by Fsbirdhouse - Monday, February 4th, 2019, 04:56 pm
Several years ago you posted on one of my threads about some substance (Paint?) that would produce a Fluorescent green. I'm flocking a brand new batch of duck decoys. I can't seem to locate it in the posts. Can you remember, and post a link to it.
I know it's years ago, but if not too much trouble I'd appreciate it.
Thanks

Your welcome. (I/Eye work for you)

iridescent according to the serpent?

[Image: before-god-cursed-the-snake-by-making-it...-wings.jpg]

Research explains how snakes lost their limbs
February 7, 2019 by José Tadeu Arantes, FAPESP

[Image: 1-researchexpl.jpg]
The study is part of an effort to understand how changes in the genome lead to changes in phenotypes . Credit: Jax Strong / Wikimedia
Snakes and lizards are reptiles that belong to the order Squamata. They share several traits but differ in one obvious respect: Snakes do not have limbs. The two suborders diverged more than 100 million years ago. Identification of the genetic factors involved in this loss of limbs is a focus of an article titled "Phenotype loss is associated with widespread divergence of the gene regulatory landscape in evolution," published by Juliana Gusson Roscito and collaborators in Nature Communications.




Another equally interesting focus of the article is eye degeneration in certain subterranean mammals. "We investigated these two cases in order to understand a much more general process, which is how genome changes during evolution lead to phenotype changes," Roscito said.

Currently working as a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, Roscito's postdoctoral scholarship was linked to the thematic project "Comparative phylogeography, phylogeny, paleoclimate modeling and taxonomy of neotropical reptiles and amphibians," for which Miguel Trefaut Urbano Rodrigues is the principal investigator. Rodrigues is a professor at the University of São Paulo's Bioscience Institute (IB-USP) in Brazil and supervised Roscito's postdoctoral research. He is also a coauthor of the recently published article.

"The research consisted of an investigation of the genomes of several species of vertebrates, including the identification of genomic regions that changed only in snakes or subterranean mammals, while remaining unchanged in other species that have not lost their limbs or have normal eyes," Roscito said.

"In mammals with degenerated visual systems, we know several genes have been lost, such as those associated with the eye's crystalline lens and with the retina's photoreceptor cells. These genes underwent mutations during the evolutionary process. Eventually, they completely lost their functionality, meaning the capacity to encode proteins. But that's not what happened to snakes, which haven't lost the genes associated with limb formation. To be more precise, the study that sequenced the genome of a snake did detect the loss of one gene, but only one. Therefore, the approach we chose in our research consisted of investigating not the genes but the elements that regulate gene expression."

Gene expression depends on regulatory elements for the information the gene contains to be transcribed into RNA (ribonucleic acid) and later translated into protein. This process is regulated by cis-regulatory elements (CREs), which are sequences of nucleotides in DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) located near the genes they regulate. CREs control the spatiotemporal and quantitative patterns of gene expression.



"A regulatory element can activate or inhibit the expression of a gene in a certain part of the organism, such as the limbs, for example, while a different regulatory element can activate or inhibit the expression of the same gene in a different part, such as the head. If the gene is lost, it ceases to be expressed in both places and can often have a negative effect on the organism's formation.

However, if only one of the regulatory elements is lost, expression may disappear in one part while being conserved in the other," Roscito explained.

Tegu lizard

From a computational standpoint, CREs are not as easy to identify as genes. Genes have a characteristic syntax, with base pairs that show where the genes begin and end. This is not the case for CREs, so they have to be identified indirectly. This identification is normally based on the conservation of DNA sequences among many species.

"To detect the divergence of specific sequences in snakes, it's necessary to compare the genomes of snakes with the genomes of various reptiles and other vertebrates that have fully developed limbs. Genome sequences for reptiles with well-developed limbs are scarce, so we sequenced and assembled the genome of the fully limbed tegu lizard, Salvator merianae. This is the first species of the teiid lineage ever sequenced," the authors said.

"Using the tegu genome as a reference, we created an alignment of the genomes of several species, including two snakes (boa and python), three other limbed reptiles (green anole lizard, dragon lizard and gecko), three birds, an alligator, three turtles, 14 mammals, a frog, and a coelacanth. This alignment of 29 genomes was used as the basis for all further analyses."

The researchers identified more than 5,000 DNA regions that are considered candidate regulatory elements in several species. They then searched the large database using ingenious technical procedures that are described in detail in the article and obtained a set of CREs the mutation of which may have led to the disappearance of limbs in the ancestors of snakes.

"There are several studies concerning a well-known regulatory element that regulates a gene that, when modified, causes various defects in limbs. Snakes have mutations in this CRE. In a study published in 2016, the mouse CRE was replaced with the snake version, resulting in practically limbless descendants. This was a functional demonstration of a mechanism that may have led to limb loss in snakes. However, this CRE is only one of the regulatory elements for one of several genes that control limb formation," Roscito said.

"Our study extended the set of CREs. We showed that several other regulatory elements responsible for regulating many genes have mutated in snakes. The signature is far more comprehensive. An entire signaling cascade is affected."

 Explore further: The warm and loving tegu lizard becomes a genetic resource

More information: Juliana G. Roscito et al, Phenotype loss is associated with widespread divergence of the gene regulatory landscape in evolution, Nature Communications (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-07122-z 

Journal reference: Nature Communications 
Provided by: FAPESP



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-02-snakes-los...s.html#jCp


freshwater from "lenses" eyework for crawling in poof-dust.


Sea snakes that can't drink seawater

February 8, 2019 by Rachel Wayne, University of Florida

[Image: seasnakestha.jpg]
The yellow-bellied sea snake (Hydrophis platurus) is the only reptile in the order Squamata that lives on the open sea. Credit: Mark Sandfoss, University of Florida
Surrounded by salty water, sea snakes sometimes live a thirsty existence. Previously, scientists thought that they were able to drink seawater, but recent research has shown that they need to access freshwater. A new study published in PLOS ONE on Feb. 7 and led by Harvey Lillywhite, professor of biology of the University of Florida, shows that sea snakes living where there is drought relieve their dehydration 
and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life: as soon as the wet season hits, and do so by obtaining freshwater from "lenses" that form on the surface of the ocean during heavy rain—events in which the salinity at the surface decreases enough for the water to be drinkable.


The yellow-bellied sea snake (Hydrophis platurus) is the only reptile in the order Squamata that lives on the open sea. It has one of the largest geographic ranges of any vertebrate species. Given its broad range and seafaring existence, during the dry season (6-7 months at the study site in Costa Rica) it has no access to freshwater. How they survive in regions of drought seems to hinge upon access to freshwater lenses, but little is known about how marine vertebrates react to or consume rainfall. "This study contributes to a fuller understanding of how pelagic sea snakes, and possibly other marine animals, avoid desiccation following seasonal drought at sea," said Lillywhite.

The researchers captured 99 sea snakes off the coast of Costa Rica (interestingly, the snakes have never been observed in estuaries) and offered them freshwater in a laboratory environment. The team happened to be there just as six months of drought broke and the rainy season began. They found that only 13 percent of snakes captured after the rainfall began accepted the offer, compared to 80 percent of those captured before. The rainfall must have quenched their thirst.

The study continues many years of work by Lillywhite. The present paper was coauthored by Mark Sandfoss, Lillywhite's current Ph.D. student, Coleman Sheehy, his former student who is now the Collections Manager in Herpetology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, and then-Fulbright visiting scholar Jenna Crowe-Riddell.

"How these animals locate and harvest precipitation is important in view of the recent declines and extinctions of some species of sea snakes," said Lillywhite. The question remains: How will climate change and its effects on precipitation impact the sea snakes?

 Explore further: Zoologists: Sea snakes seek out freshwater to slake thirst

More information: Harvey B. Lillywhite et al, Drinking by sea snakes from oceanic freshwater lenses at first rainfall ending seasonal drought, PLOS ONE (2019). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0212099 

Journal reference: PLoS ONE 
Provided by: University of Florida



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-02-sea-snakes-seawater.html#jCp


Quote:I can't seem to locate it in the posts. Can you remember, and post a link to it.
I know it's years ago, but if not too much trouble I'd appreciate it.
Thanks
To learn in return I/Eye ask that while we were on the subject I scaled it all Ma'at @ that.

I had no place to post about this other egg-laying quackless critter and several years down the road I will recall:

King James Bible

And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:

ducks can be drakes and as iridescent as snakes and their women-folk both lay eggs.

In order to decoy you must cite-sight-site an eye/I /Aye

Be the duck zen sorta See the duck.

itza snake that sang real:
Happy Hunting.
you are no longer in bad-luck's bind when you add duck's-unblind and had your redux-a-lux-find.[Image: Iridescent_Metallic_Greenhead_1.jpg]

You didn't think you would get anything less than prescient improv as well as a duck-luster bluster.

not on a limb...

Quote:This was a functional demonstration of a mechanism that may have led to limb loss in snakes.

Does the ancient serpent recall any fingers or toes?

FEBRUARY 5, 2019
Brain hand 'map' is maintained in amputees with and without phantom limb sensations
by eLife
[Image: 4-brain.jpg]Credit: CC0 Public Domain
Researchers have found that the brain stores detailed information of a missing hand decades after amputation, regardless of whether amputees still experience phantom hand sensations.

Their study, published in eLife, revealed detailed hand information in the brains of amputees compared with people who had been born with a missing hand. The research could pave the way for the development of next-generation neuroprosthetics—prosthetic limbs that tap into the brain's control centre.


The findings build on the team's previous work where they used an ultra-high-power MRI scanner to look at the brain activity of two people who had lost their left hand through amputation between two and three decades ago. Although there was less brain activity related to the fingers of the left hand, they found that the specific patterns making up the composition of the hand picture in the brain were well matched to those of two-handed people.
"Our previous findings demonstrated the stability of the hand picture in the cortex despite decades of amputation," explains lead author Daan Wesselink, a Ph.D. student at the University of Oxford and UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UK. "However, we didn't know whether this hand representation in the brain reflects phantom sensations and therefore only persists in those few people who experience vivid sensations."
To address this question, they used a brain-decoding technique based on the pattern of brain activity in 18 amputees, who lost their hand to amputation on average 18 years ago and experience varying vividness of phantom sensations. The team also looked at whether development of the hand's neural fingerprints requires some prior experience of having a hand, by studying 13 people who were missing one hand from birth. They asked both groups to 'move' the fingers of their missing and intact hands while in an MRI scanner, and compared the results to two-handed participants.
They found that the brain activity of amputees who had the strongest sensations of being able to move each of their phantom fingers retained the clearest information of their missing hand in their brain. But even those who barely experience phantom hand sensations had the same information preserved in their brains, which was surprising because those amputees have no experiences during their daily life that their brain has held on to this information about their former limb.
By contrast, the group born with one hand showed some brain activity during phantom limb movement, but did not have the same neural fingerprint dedicated to their missing hand. This suggests it could be more challenging to design neuroprostheses or perform hand transplants for this group.
"We've shown that once the hand 'picture' in the brain is formed, it is generally unlikely to change, despite years of amputation and irrespective of the vividness of phantom sensations," concludes senior author Tamar Makin, Associate Professor and Sir Henry Dale Fellow at the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. "Our work suggests that daily life experience could shape the fine-grained aspects of hand representation, but that the large-scale functional organisation of the hand area is fundamentally stable."


[size=undefined]

Explore further
Amputees' brains remember missing hands even years later[/size]


[size=undefined]

More information: Daan B Wesselink et al, Obtaining and maintaining cortical hand representation as evidenced from acquired and congenital handlessness, eLife (2019). DOI: 10.7554/eLife.37227[/size]



...also recall:


Quote:What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.

Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10

Sang Real: Now.


Researchers find evidence for a new fundamental constant of the Sun
February 7, 2019, Northumbria University

[Image: 5c5c4f827ff9b.jpg]
The Sun's corona - its outermost layer of atmosphere. Credit: Northumbria University, Newcastle

New research undertaken at Northumbria University, Newcastle shows that the sun's magnetic waves behave differently than currently believed.



Their findings have been reported in Nature Astronomy.

After examining data gathered over a 10-year period, the team from Northumbria's Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering found that magnetic waves in the sun's corona – its outermost layer of atmosphere – react to sound waves escaping from the inside of the sun.

These magnetic waves, known as Alfvénic waves, play a crucial role in transporting energy around the sun and the solar system. The waves were previously thought to originate at the sun's surface, where boiling hydrogen reaches temperatures of 6,000 degrees and churns the sun's magnetic field.

However, the researchers have found evidence that the magnetic waves also react – or are excited – higher in the atmosphere by sound waves leaking out from the inside of the sun.

The team discovered that the sound waves leave a distinctive marker on the magnetic waves. The presence of this marker means that the sun's entire corona is shaking in a collective manner in response to the sound waves. This is causing it to vibrate over a very clear range of frequencies.

This newly-discovered marker is found throughout the corona and was consistently present over the 10-year time-span examined. This suggests that it is a fundamental constant of the sun – and could potentially be a fundamental constant of other stars.

The findings could therefore have significant implications for our current ideas about how magnetic energy is transferred and used in stellar atmospheres.

Dr. Richard Morton, the lead author of the report and a senior lecturer at Northumbria University, said: "The discovery of such a distinctive marker – potentially a new constant of the sun – is very exciting. We have previously always thought that the magnetic waves were excited by the hydrogen at the surface, but now we have shown that they are excited by these sound waves. This could lead to a new way to examine and classify the behaviour of all stars under this unique signature. Now we know the signature is there, we can go looking for it on other stars.

"The sun's corona is over one hundred times hotter than its surface and energy stemming from the Alfvénic waves is believed to be responsible for heating the corona to a temperature of around one million degrees. The Alfvénic waves are also responsible for heating and accelerating powerful solar wind from the sun which travels through the solar system. These winds travel at speeds of around a million miles per hour. They also affect the atmosphere of stars and planets, impacting on their own magnetic fields, and cause phenomena such as aurora."

Dr. Morton added: "Our evidence shows that the sun's internal acoustic oscillations play a significant role in exciting the magnetic Alfvénic waves. This can give the waves different properties and suggests that they are more susceptible to an instability, which could lead to hotter and faster solar winds."

Dr. Morton and Professor McLaughlin are currently working with NASA to analyse images of the sun which were taken by NASA's High-Resolution Coronal Imager, Hi-C.

Their paper, "A basal contribution from p-modes to the Alfvenic wave flux in the sun's corona" is published in Nature Astronomy.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: New research brings light to star mystery

More information: R. J. Morton et al. A basal contribution from p-modes to the Alfvénic wave flux in the Sun's corona, Nature Astronomy (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41550-018-0668-9 

Journal reference: Nature Astronomy [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: Northumbria University



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-02-evidence-f...n.html#jCp

Look what happens when you think you just asked a simple question.
Now thatza quacked-a-fact huh?
anu fundamental constant of the Sun=333,000/1

"See, this is new?"  get your free snake-oil y'all

However, the researchers have found evidence that the magnetic waves also react – or are excited – higher in the atmosphere by sound waves leaking out from the inside of the sun.

[Image: snake-speak-300x224.png?w=604] Sang Real eh?
Reply
#4
Alright Buddy
Thanks! That looks like just what I'm looking for!

Yes! Iridescent is just what I meant. Gosh...I'm getting old and befuddled.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#5
No problemo.

I had to post those quacktoids sum-where that I can find them later...
Sheep
,,,this thread sufficed in a future review.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#6
A new quacktoid:

Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch
March 1, 2019, Biophysical Society

[Image: ducksofferre.jpg]
A light-sheet microscope image of embryonic duckbill skin stained with Tuj1 antibodies to label sensory neurons. Credit: Slav Bagriantsev


If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works.




"We know a lot about how we see, taste, and smell," Bagriantsev explained, "but we actually don't know much about how touch works at the molecular level."

They will present their insights into the mechanics of touch at the 63rd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, to be held March 2—6, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland.

There is only one molecule, so far, that has been identified as being important for touch in vertebrates like humans, mice, and ducks, called Piezo2. Most of what we know about Piezo2 has come from research in mice, however, a mouse's skin is mostly covered with hair—unlike the glabrous skin on our palms or lips. Bagriantsev and his colleagues decided to study ducks, whose bills are covered with glabrous skin like ours, which can help them learn about human touch too. Ducks, geese, and swans are unique among waterfowl in that they are picky about the food they eat—they wouldn't be able to do this without their specialized bills.

They found that the clusters of neurons responsible for sensing touch exist in similar density in ducks' bills as they do in human and primate palms. When tiny forces, like those that might be generated from a tadpole wiggling in murky water, stretch the neurons in a duck bill, Piezo2 opens and lets ions into the neuron. When enough ions enter, the neuron fires, sending a signal to the brain telling the duck there's movement nearby. Bagriantsev and colleagues found that duck Piezo2 allows more ions to enter the neuron by staying open longer, compared to mouse Piezo2. This tiny difference probably allows a duck bill to be more sensitive to touch than a mouse's paw.

"It seems that ducks capitalized on what most vertebrates normally have," said Bagriantsev.

Piezo2 is probably not the only molecule involved in touch. Mice without Piezo2 have tactile deficits, but are still able to detect touch and navigate the world, so there must be other molecules involved. Bagriantsev and his colleagues hope that ducks' bills will help them reveal the other players in the sensation of touch.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Feeling ducky: Extreme mechano-sensitive neurons of tactile-foraging ducks fit the bill for touch research

Provided by: Biophysical Society


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ducks-unique-opportunity-human.html#jCp
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply


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