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In the beginning: Genesis of Isreal's moon-quest
#1
Photos: Beresheet lander tested for historic moon mission

February 21, 2019 Stephen Clark
The Beresheet moon lander will attempt to become the first privately-funded spacecraft to reach the moon, and these photos show the robotic probe’s journey through testing inside a clean room at Israel Aerospace Industries, followed by its attachment to a multi-satellite stack for launch on a Falcon 9 rocket.
Beresheet, which means “genesis” or “in the beginning” in Hebrew, is the product of a nearly eight-year effort by SpaceIL, an Israeli non-profit. With the help of backing from billionaire entrepreneurs, and donations from Israeli companies like IAI, the spacecraft is set for launch Feb. 21 from Cape Canaveral.
Landing on the moon is scheduled for April. Read our full story for details on the mission.

[Image: The-first-Israeli-spacecraft-by-SpaceIL-...-Weiss.jpg]

https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/02/21/ph...n-mission/

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Live coverage: Falcon 9 rocket blasts off with Israeli moon lander, Indonesian comsat
February 21, 2019
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off at 8:45 p.m. EST Thursday (0145 GMT Friday) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The commercial launcher, featuring a reused first stage booster flying for the third time, hauled into orbit Indonesia’s Nusantara Satu communications satellite, the Beresheet lunar lander for SpaceIL, and the S5 space surveillance payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory.
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#2
Computer reset cancels orbit-raising burn on Israel’s moon lander
February 26, 2019 Stephen Clark


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[/url][url=https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/02/26/computer-reset-cancels-orbit-raising-burn-on-israels-moon-lander/#]
[img=679x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/the-spacecraft-route-to-the-moon-5.jpg[/img]Artist’s illustration of the Beresheet lander’s elliptical transfer orbit around Earth. Credit: SpaceIL
A computer reset on the Israeli Beresheet lunar lander forced has the postponement of the mission’s first engine firing to begin maneuvering closer to the moon, officials said Tuesday.
Mission managers said the robotic lander — seeking to become the first privately-funded spacecraft to reach another planetary body — automatically aborted an orbit-raising maneuver after its on-board computer reset unexpectedly. The engine firing was planned Monday evening, U.S. time.
“During the pre-maneuver phase the spacecraft computer reset unexpectedly, causing the maneuver to be automatically cancelled,” the team said in a statement.
Beresheet — which means “in the beginning” or “genesis” in Hebrew — launched Feb. 21 from Cape Canaveral on top of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, riding piggyback with the Indonesian Nusantara Satu communications payload and the U.S. Air Force’s S5 spacecraft to monitor satellite traffic in geostationary orbit.

The Falcon 9 rocket’s upper stage released its payloads in an elliptical orbit ranging up to 43,000 miles (more than 69,000 kilometers) above Earth, with a perigee, or low point, less than 200 miles in altitude.
While Nusantara Satu and the military’s S5 space surveillance spacecraft head for geostationary orbit — located more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator — Beresheet is heading the the moon, taking a circuitous stepwise approach utilizing 10 burns by the lander’s main engine, a repurposed communications satellite thruster.
Beresheet was developed by SpaceIL, an Israeli non-profit organization founded to promote education for Israeli students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. SpaceIL raised money from private donors to cover the Beresheet lander’s nearly $100 million development cost, with a prime goal of inspiring students to pursue scientific and engineering careers.
Minutes after arriving in space, Beresheet radioed its status to ground controllers at Israeli Aerospace Industries, which built the lander for SpaceIL. The probe’s four landing legs extended as designed shortly after separating from the rocket.
[Image: The-first-Israeli-spacecraft-by-SpaceIL-...-Weiss.jpg]SpaceIL’s Beresheet lunar lander. Credit: SpaceIL
The ground team noticed the lander’s star trackers, which the spacecraft needs to determine its orientation in space, have “high sensitivity to blinding by the sun’s rays.”
Beresheet ignited its 100-pound-thrust main engine for the first time Sunday to raise the perigee of its orbit to an altitude of roughly 373 miles (600 kilometers). The perigee raise maneuver lasted 30 seconds and went off without a hitch, according to SpaceIL.
But the lander’s computer reset Monday while it was out of communications with the ground team, triggering the abort of the next engine burn, which was planned to extend the apogee of Beresheet’s orbit nearly 73,000 miles (117,000 kilometers) from Earth.
Monday’s burn was the first maneuver programmed to send Beresheet closer to the moon, located approximately a quarter-million miles (400,000 kilometers) from Earth.
“The engineering teams of SpaceIL and IAI are examining the data and analyzing the situation. At this time, the spacecraft’s systems are working well, except for the known problem in the star tracker,” SpaceIL said in a statement. “Communication between the control center and the spacecraft remains as planned, and Beresheet continues its previous orbit until the next maneuver.”
The Beresheet spacecraft was scheduled to enter lunar orbit April 4, then spiral down to a lower altitude in preparation for landing April 11 in Mare Serenitatis, one of the vast, dark lava plains on the near side of the moon.
Beresheet is taking a long, circuitous journey to the moon to save money and fuel. The mission would have needed a dedicated rocket to make a direct trip to the moon, an expense the SpaceIL team could not afford.
Other missions have successfully taken a long trip to the moon before, including NASA’s LADEE probe, which launched in September 2013 and arrived at the moon a month later after several burns to boost its orbit farther from Earth before its capture by lunar gravity/
One of the pitfalls of using a longer journey to reach the moon is that the probe spends more time traveling through the radiation belts, donut-shaped rings of charged particles surrounding Earth that could pose a hazard to spacecraft electronics. It was not immediately clear if radiation could have caused Beresheet’s computer to reset Monday.
Beresheet’s original flight plan called five engine burns to position the spacecraft near the moon April 4, when a sixth engine firing — with the help of lunar gravity — was planned to swing the probe into an elliptical lunar orbit. Additional engine firings were planned to lower Beresheet’s altitude above the moon to a circular orbit, before the final braking maneuver ahead of the April 11 landing.
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/02/26/co...on-lander/
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#3
Israel's first spacecraft to moon sends selfie
March 5, 2019

[Image: 3-ahandoutpict.jpg]
A handout picture released by SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) on March 5, 2019, shows a picture taken by the camera of the Beresheet spacecraft


An Israeli spacecraft on its maiden mission to the moon has sent its first selfie back to Earth, mission chiefs said on Tuesday.




The image showing part of the Beresheet spacecraft with Earth in the background was beamed to mission control in Yehud, Israel—37,600 kilometres (23,360 miles) away, the project's lead partners said in a statement.

The partners, NGO SpaceIL and state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries, launched the unmanned Beresheet—Hebrew for Genesis—from Cape Canaveral in Florida on February 22.

The 585-kilogram (1,290-pound) craft took off atop a Falcon 9 rocket from the private US-based SpaceX company of entrepreneur Elon Musk.

The trip is scheduled to last seven weeks, with the Beresheet due to touch down on April 11.

So far, only Russia, the United States and China have made the 384,000-kilometre (239,000-mile) journey and landed on the moon.

The Israeli mission comes amid renewed global interest in the moon, 50 years after American astronauts first walked on its surface.

China's Chang'e-4 made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon on January 3, after a probe sent by Beijing made a lunar landing elsewhere in 2013.

For Israel, the landing itself is the main mission, but the spacecraft also carries a scientific instrument to measure the lunar magnetic field, which will help understanding of the moon's formation.

It also carries a "time capsule" loaded with digital files containing a Bible, children's drawings, Israeli songs, memories of a Holocaust survivor and the blue-and-white Israeli flag.

After China earlier this year, and now Israel, India hopes to become the fifth lunar country in the spring with its Chandrayaan-2 mission. It aims to put a craft with a rover onto the moon's surface to collect data.

Japan plans to send a small lunar lander, called SLIM, to study a volcanic area around 2020-2021.

As for the Americans, who have not been back to the moon since 1972, a return is now the official policy of NASA, according to guidelines issued by President Donald Trump in 2017.

NASA, which has installed equipment on Beresheet to upload its signals from the moon, says it is inviting private sector bids to build and launch the US probes.

The US space agency plans to build a small space station, dubbed Gateway, in the moon's orbit by 2026, and envisages a manned mission to Mars in the following decade.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-03-israel-spacecraft-moon-selfie.html#jCp
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#4
Elon will be the 1st Human that gets to Mars imho.

Though I'd still go with the 1st 'unmanned' BFR even if he's not landing at longitude but is DEAD ON the latitude to make a quick drive to Downtown Cydonia.  I know I last simply by eating one meal a day and stay in 20 h/b/m state, that way he would want to know if a dead body be cleaned from a suit to be reused from Mars itself.

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#5
Quote:“Tiny Israel, tiny, tiny Israel, is about to become the fourth nation to land on the moon. And this is a remarkable thing, because we continue to demonstrate our ability to punch far, far, far above our weight, and to show off our skills, our innovation, our creativity in tackling any difficult problem that could possibly exist.”
November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 32 days remaining until the end of the year

One more step which led to the miracle of today's Jewish country of Israel. On 29 November 1947, the United Nations General Assembly voted 33 to 13, with 10 abstentions and 1 absent, in favour of the Palestine Partition Plan.

[/url]November 29: Every Jew Should Know About This Day: The Israel ...


https://israelforever.org/.../november_2..._this_day/




Beresheet lander on course for the moon
[url=https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/03/]March 19, 2019 Stephen Clark

[Image: Cam6-Selfie-image-from-Beresheet-37.600-...arth-2.jpg][img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Cam6-Selfie-image-from-Beresheet-37.600-km-from-Earth-2.jpg[/img]A camera on-board the Beresheet lander captured this view of Earth from a distance of more than 23,000 miles (37,000 kilometers). Credit: SpaceIL
The privately-funded Israeli Bersesheet lander is on course to enter orbit around the moon April 4 after another boost from its main engine Tuesday.

A 60-second firing by Beresheet’s 100-pound-thrust main engine at 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 GMT) Tuesday raised the apogee, or high point, of the spacecraft’s elliptical orbit around the Earth to an altitude of more than 250,000 miles (405,000 kilometers), according to SpaceIL, the non-profit group that heads the privately-backed lunar lander mission.
“That’s enough to reach the distance of the moon from the Earth, and it’s actually our last maneuver to get closer to the moon,” said Opher Doron, general manager of Israel Aerospace Industries’ space division, which built the Beresheet spacecraft and operates the lander’s control center. “We will have a couple of more maneuvers over the following days that are small maneuvers to slightly adjust our trajectory, but we are on our way to the moon, very successfully, right now.”
Since its launch Feb. 21 from Cape Canaveral on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, the Beresheet lander has fired its main engine several times to raise its altitude closer to the moon. Beresheet, which means “genesis” or “in the beginning” in Hebrew, rode as a secondary payload on the Falcon 9 rocket, which delivered the lander, an Indonesian communications satellite and a U.S. Air Force smallsat to an egg-shaped supersynchronous transfer orbit ranging as high as 43,000 miles (69,000 kilometers) from Earth.
[Image: the-spacecraft-route-to-the-moon-7.jpg][img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/the-spacecraft-route-to-the-moon-7.jpg[/img]This illustration shows how the Beresheet spacecraft’s orbit-raising burns gradually raised the moon lander’s altitude to intercept the moon April 4. Credit: SpaceIL
The Indonesian Nusantara Satu communications satellite and the Air Force’s S5 space surveillance craft maneuvered into geostationary orbit over the equator, while Beresheet began orbit-raising burns to head for the moon. Beresheet’s British-built LEROS 2b main engine, a modified version of an engine designed for commercial satellites, has conducted four orbit-raising firings since launch.
  • Burn 1: Feb. 24 at 1129 GMT (6:29 a.m. EST); 30 seconds

  • Burn 2: Feb. 28 at 1930 GMT (2:30 p.m. EST); 4 minutes

  • Burn 3: March 7 at 1311 GMT (8:11 a.m. EST); 2 minutes, 32 seconds

  • Burn 4: March 19 at 1230 GMT (8:30 a.m. EDT); 1 minute
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Ground controllers identified an issue with the spacecraft’s star tracker cameras shortly after launch. The cameras are used to locate the positions of stars in the sky, helping determine Beresheet’s orientation in space. SpaceIL says the star trackers are too sensitive to blinding by bright sunlight.
“We’ve learned to deal with difficulties we’ve been having with the star trackers, and what that entails in maneuvering the spacecraft in a non-nominal fashion,” Doron said Tuesday. “So that was working quite well today. We were lucky to have the engine firing in a communications pass. We actually saw it in real-time.”
With its four landing legs extended, Beresheet has a diameter of around 7.5 feet (2.3 meters), and measures 4.9 feet (1.5 meters) tall.
Beresheet’s main engine will fire again April 4 to steer into a preliminary orbit around the moon, followed by additional rocket burns to spiral closer to the lunar surface, setting up for landing April 11 on the moon’s Mare Serenitatis region.
[Image: beresheet1.jpg][img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/beresheet1.jpg[/img]The completed SpaceIL Beresheet lunar lander is pictured with its solar panels attached. Credit: SpaceIL
The landing site is in the northern hemisphere of the moon’s near side, where cameras will capture panoramic views of the lunar surface, and a science instrument will measure the magnetic field. NASA also provided a laser reflector on the solar-powered spacecraft, which scientists will use to determine the exact distance to the moon.
The U.S. space agency is also providing communications and tracking support to the mission, and the German space agency, DLR, provided facilities for Israeli engineers to simulate Beresheet’s landing on the moon.
But Beresheet is privately-funded, and the mission aims to become the first to reach the moon without government backing. Billionaire philanthropists supported the $100 million mission’s development through financial contributions.
“We have a vision to show off Israel’s best qualities to the entire world,” said Sylvan Adams, a Canadian-Israeli businessman who contributed to the mission, in a press conference before Beresheet’s launch. “Tiny Israel, tiny, tiny Israel, is about to become the fourth nation to land on the moon. And this is a remarkable thing, because we continue to demonstrate our ability to punch far, far, far above our weight, and to show off our skills, our innovation, our creativity in tackling any difficult problem that could possibly exist.”
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Israel’s Beresheet lander brakes into lunar orbit
April 4, 2019 Stephen Clark


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[url=https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/04/04/israels-beresheet-lander-brakes-into-lunar-orbit/#]
[img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/beresheet_loi_traj1.jpg[/img]The Beresheet spacecraft’s six-minute deceleration burn Thursday steered the probe into orbit around the moon. Credit: SpaceIL
Six weeks after launching from Cape Canaveral, an Israeli-built probe funded through private donations arrived in orbit around the moon Thursday, setting the stage for the mission’s final descent to the lunar surface April 11.
Engineers at the Beresheet mission control center in Israel confirmed the successful maneuver after telemetry radioed from the spacecraft showed it fired its main engine for approximately six minutes, slowing its speed enough to allow the moon’s gravity to capture the probe in an elongated lunar orbit.
The Beresheet spacecraft ignited its main engine at 1418 GMT (10:18 a.m. EDT) Thursday for the make-or-break maneuver to steer into orbit around the moon. If the probe misfired, Israeli officials said the spacecraft would have continued on into deep space, bringing the mission to an end.
Mission controllers, managers and VIPs watched as data relayed from the spacecraft to the Israeli control center showed the engine burning normally. A display showing the total velocity change, or delta-V, from the engine firing counted upward until it reached 323.663 meters per second (724 mph).

The engine burn was designed to slow the probe’s velocity by 324 meters per second, and officials celebrated the result, which made Israel the seventh country or international organization to place a spacecraft in orbit around the moon — after Russia, the United States, Japan, the European Space Agency, China and India.
“After six weeks in space, we have succeeded in overcoming another critical stage by entering the moon’s gravity,” said Ido Anteby, CEO of SpaceIL, a non-profit organization founded in 2011 to manage Beresheet’s development. “This is another significant achievement our engineering team achieved while demonstrating determination and creativity in finding solutions to unexpected challenges. We still have a long way until the lunar landing, but I‘m convinced our team will complete the mission to land the first Israeli spacecraft on the moon, making us all proud.”
Beresheet was expected to enter an elliptical, or oval-shaped, orbit ranging between 310 miles (500 kilometers) and 6,200 miles (10,000 kilometers) above the moon’s surface. Several more engine firings during the next week will place Beresheet in a circular 124-mile-high (200-kilometer) orbit in preparation for landing.
[img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/beresheet_deltav_1.jpg[/img]A display at the Beresheet mission control center in Israel displayed the total velocity change, or delta-V, of 323.663 meters per second, or 724 mph, imparted during Thursday’s lunar capture burn. Credit: SpaceIL
Beresheet’s lunar capture maneuver Thursday was also historic for the commercial space industry. The mission was designed, built and launched for around $100 million, and almost all of the funding came from private donors and corporate investments.
“We’ve done it! First privately funded spacecraft in lunar orbit,” tweeted Yoav Landsman, Beresheet’s deputy mission director at SpaceIL. “Feels like the dawn of a new era of commercial space.”
Morris Kahn, a South African-born Israeli billionaire, contributed $40 million of his fortune to the project. Kahn, 89, was at Beresheet’s control center in Israel for Thursday’s critical maneuver.
“We’ve had support from all over the world,” Kahn said Thursday. “NASA has recognized what we’re doing, and the world has recognized what we’re doing, and what we’re doing is we’re pioneering something in space. We’re showing that a small country can actually do an amazing job.”
But more perils remain ahead for Beresheet. Its mission will culminate with a landing April 11 — next Thursday — in the Mare Serenitatis, or Sea of Serenity, region on the upper right part of the moon as viewed from Earth.
“After a challenging journey, we made tonight another Israeli record and became the seventh nation to orbit the moon,” said Nimrod Sheffer, CEO of Israel Aerospace Industries, Beresheet’s prime contractor. “Even before Beresheet was launched, it already was a national success story that shows our groundbreaking technological capabilities. Tonight, we again reach new heights. In the coming week, our talented engineering team will work 24/7 to bring us to an historic event on April 11.”
Beresheet launched Feb. 21 from Cape Canaveral aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, riding piggyback with a larger Indonesian communications satellite and an experimental U.S. Air Force spacecraft.
The Falcon 9’s upper stage released Beresheet in an elliptical orbit ranging as high as 43,000 miles (69,000 kilometers) in altitude. After separation, the spacecraft deployed its four landing legs. With the lander gear extended, Beresheet has a diameter of around 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) and measures 4.9 feet (1.5 meters) tall, about the size of a golf cart.
A series of main engine burns nudged Beresheet into longer orbits that took the spacecraft farther from Earth. Beresheet traveled more than 3.4 million miles — about 5.5 million kilometers — between its departure from Cape Canaveral and arrival in lunar orbit.
Ground controllers identified an issue with the spacecraft’s star tracker cameras shortly after launch. The cameras are used to locate the positions of stars in the sky, helping determine Beresheet’s orientation in space. SpaceIL says the star trackers are too sensitive to blinding by bright sunlight.
Beresheet also missed one of its orbit-raising engine burns in late February due to a computer reset, but engineers kept mission on schedule for its arrival at the moon.
[img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/beresheet_mcc.jpg[/img]Ground controllers work inside the Beresheet mission control center in Israel. Credit: SpaceIL
With Beresheet’s landing — the spacecraft’s most challenging task — still ahead, SpaceIL officials are still cautious about the the mission’s chances of a safe touchdown.
“Once we reach the right point we’ll be just giving the spacecraft the command to start the landing phase,” said Yariv Bash, a co-founder of SpaceIL. “From that moment on, the spacecraft will automatically start landing on its own, all the way to the surface of the moon.
“Roughly 15 feet (5 meters) or so above the surface of the moon, the velocity will go to zero, and then we’ll just shut off the motors and the spacecraft will perform a free fall all the way to the surface of the moon,” Bash said Tuesday. “The legs of the spacecraft were designed to sustain that fall, and hopefully once we are on the moon we’ll be able to send back images and videos to Earth.”
Three young Israeli engineers and entrepreneurs established SpaceIL in 2011 in pursuit of the Google Lunar X Prize, which promised $20 million grand prize for the first team to land a privately-funded spacecraft on the moon, return high-definition imagery, and demonstrate mobility on the lunar surface.
The Google Lunar X Prize contest ended last year without a winner, but Beresheet’s backers kept the mission alive.
Kahn, the mission’s largest single financial contributor, serves as SpaceIL’s president. Other donors include Miriam and Sheldon Adelson, a casino and resort magnate who lives in Las Vegas. IAI, the lander’s prime contractor, also invested some of its own internal research and development money into the program.
The Israeli Space Agency awarded SpaceIL around $2 million, the program’s only government funding.
The entire mission cost significantly less than any government-backed lunar lander. Still, raising $100 million from private donors proved a challenge.
“I never in my wildest dreams thought that we would get to something like $100 million, but once we got going, we were actually in,” Kahn said Tuesday. “It was a challenge, and actually, I love a challenge.”
[img=788x0]https://mk0spaceflightnoa02a.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/beresheet_timecapsule.jpg[/img]SpaceIL co-founders Kfir Damari, Yonatan Winetraub and Yariv Bash insert a time capsule on the Beresheet spacecraft. The time capsule includes three discs with digital files that will remain on the moon with the spacecraft. The discs include details on the spacecraft and the crew that built it, and national and cultural symbols, such as the Israeli flag, the Israeli national anthem, and the Bible. Credit: SpaceIL
The X Prize Foundation, which organized the original Google Lunar X Prize competition, announced March 28 that it will offer a $1 million “Moonshot Award” to SpaceIL if the Beresheet mission successfully lands on the moon.
“Though the Google Lunar X Prize went unclaimed, we are thrilled to have stimulated a diversity of teams from around the world to pursue their ambitious lunar missions, and we are proud to be able to recognize SpaceIL’s accomplishment with this Moonshot Award,” said Anousheh Ansari, chief executive officer of the X Prize Foundation.
“SpaceIL’s mission represents the democratization of space exploration,” said Peter Diamandis, founder and executive chairman of the X Prize Foundation. “We are optimistic about seeing this first domino fall, setting off a chain reaction of increasingly affordable and repeatable commercial missions to the moon and beyond.”
A successful landing will not only mark a first for the private space industry, but will also thrust Israel into an exclusive group of nations that have put a spacecraft on the moon. So far, the United States, Russia and China have successfully landed probes on the moon.
“We have a vision to show off Israel’s best qualities to the entire world,” said Sylvan Adams, a Canadian-Israeli businessman who helped fund the mission, in a press conference between Beresheet’s launch. “Tiny Israel, tiny, tiny Israel, is about to become the fourth nation to land on the moon. And this is a remarkable thing, because we continue to demonstrate our ability to punch far, far, far above our weight, and to show off our skills, our innovation, our creativity in tackling any difficult problem that could possibly exist.”
Because of the project’s limited budget — a fraction of the cost of government-funded lunar landers — the Israeli team had to adapt technology designed for other purposes to the moon mission. For example, the main thruster on the lander is a modified engine typically used to adjust the orbits of large communications satellites.
During the landing sequence, the engine will be switched on and off to control the lander’s descent rate. It can’t be throttled.
Most of the systems on the spacecraft were built without a backup to control costs.
“Our spacecraft has very low redundancy,” Anteby said Tuesday. “One sensor that fails could fail the whole mission.”
After landing, Beresheet will collect data on the magnetic field at the landing site. NASA also provided a laser reflector on the spacecraft, which scientists will use to determine the exact distance to the moon, and to pinpoint the lander’s location. The U.S. space agency is also providing communications and tracking support to the mission.
The German space agency — DLR — also helped the SpaceIL team with drop testing to simulate the conditions the spacecraft will encounter at the moment of landing.
The Israeli-built lander is designed to function at least two days on the moon, enough time to beam back basic scientific data and a series of panoramic images, plus a selfie. The laser reflector is a passive payload, and will be useful long after the spacecraft stops operating.
Beresheet also aims to deliver a time capsule to the moon with the Israeli flag, and digital copies of the Israeli national anthem, the Bible, and other national and cultural artifacts.
Opher Doron, general manager of IAI’s space division, said he originally did foresee any business applications for the custom-designed lander design after the Beresheet mission. But that is changing as NASA and the European Space Agency look at purchasing commercial rides to the moon for science experiments, and eventually people.
IAI and OHB, a German aerospace company, signed an agreement in January that could build on the Beresheet mission by constructing future commercial landers to ferry scientific instruments and other payloads to the moon’s surface for ESA.
According to Doron, IAI is also in discussions with U.S. companies to use Israeli technology developed for the Beresheet project on commercial lunar landers for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. NASA selected nine companies last year to be eligible to compete for contracts to transport science and tech demo payloads to the lunar surface.
SpaceIL and IAI were not among the winners, but Israeli engineers could partner with U.S. firms to meet NASA’s requirements.



https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/04/04/is...nar-orbit/
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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#7
...
Well, I hope they land safely.
Quotes that caught my eye:

Quote:Most of the systems on the spacecraft were built without a backup to control costs.

“Our spacecraft has very low redundancy,” 

Anteby said Tuesday. 
“One sensor that fails could fail the whole mission.”


This spacecraft is manufactured to severe budget limitations,
and pretty much produced to rely on good luck all the way. 
So it had to be good work done right the first time, with quality equipment installed.
ie
those had better be good quality sensors Whip



Quote:The Israeli-built lander is designed to function at least two days on the moon  Horsepoop   

enough time 
to beam back basic scientific  Sheep data


That is if they land successfully.
Functions for maybe two days ... ?    I sense a sensor failure ... on day 3.



Quote:Beresheet also aims to deliver a time capsule  Spam
to the moon with the Israeli flag, 
and digital copies of the Israeli national anthem, the Bible, 
and 
other national and cultural artifacts.


Cultural artifacts in a time capsule.
Likely to be ancient alien ones somewhere, some day found.
Maybe one on Mars with a crown, sword, and a skull,
next to a bible of sacred Guitar geometry inside, 
would be dandy.
...
Reply
#8
Theres one more crater on the Moon now.
Reply
#9
Zionists failure is well deserved.  Moon EBE's couldn't stand having them poking around..i.e..we do not want you here.

LilD 


Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Light" - Jefferson Starship-Windows of Heaven Album
I'm an Earthling with a Martian Soul wanting to go Home.   
You have to turn your own lightbulb on. ©stevo25 & rhw007
Reply
#10
...

Bob, I disagree, they are a much better choice to there than the Chinese.
Nonetheless,
Quote:Anteby said Tuesday,
“One sensor that fails could fail the whole mission.”


quote V

Quote:I sense a sensor failure



Well ... they made it there. 
They were surprised to get that far with their low budget operation. 


Russian Soyuz failure in October while taking off 
https://www.theguardian.com/science/vide...lure-video
Footage from inside Soyuz spacecraft shows crew at moment of failure – video


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#11
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You can kind of see that Israeli pile of trash splattered on the moon in your imagination.
How many years would it take to look ancient, tarnished with a patina,  and half buried?
Will it become a collector artifact of the future?
I can see the newspaper headlines in 2078, 
about the recovery of a NASA rover on Mars for the museum.
Ancient alien artifacts as spacecraft sound adventuresome, 
but you never envision those to look like the Beresheet lander.

It is laying there like a smashed and broken up plastic play toy with gold foil all torn in pieces everywhere.

Space trash becomes an issue in near space,
and space trash will become an issue in human colonies.
No matter what,'
if there are ancient aliens, there is ancient trash and refuse which often gets centrally located.
Auto wrecking yards.
Spacecraft wrecking yards.
etc
etc
Or something just crash landed in the middle of random nowhere.
Ten million years ago.


Quote:Anteby said Tuesday,
“One sensor that fails could fail the whole mission.”


Just how do you get spare parts, or a tow home for your spacecraft stuck on Mars? 
You don't in most cases.
You might get a rescue ride out.
The alien spacecraft is now sitting on Mars in the middle of random nowhere,
a few million years ago.

I wonder how long the gold colored foil on the Beresheet lander wreckage,
will stay gold in color while exposed on the lunar surface.
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#12
Quote: Wrote:Anteby said Tuesday,
“One sensor that fails could fail the whole mission.”


quote V

Quote: Wrote:I sense a sensor failure



See.
Vianova that was improv  Arrow manifest.

Eye read into it required intuit.

APRIL 12, 2019
Israeli spacecraft crashes in attempt to land on moon
by Isabel Debre
[Image: 2-israelispace.jpg]Pepper watch the live broadcast of the SpaceIL spacecraft as it lost contact with Earth in Netanya, Thursday, April 11, 2019. An Israeli spacecraft has failed in its attempt to make history as the first privately funded lunar mission.The SpaceIL spacecraft lost contact with Earth late Thursday, just moments before it was to land on the moon, and scientists declared the mission a failure. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
An Israeli spacecraft crashed into the moon just moments before touchdown, failing in an ambitious attempt to make history Thursday as the first privately funded lunar landing.

The spacecraft lost communication with ground control during its final descent. Moments later, the mission was declared a failure.
"We definitely crashed on the surface of the moon," said Opher Doron of Israel Aerospace Industries.
He said the spacecraft's engine turned off shortly before landing, and scientists were still trying to figure out the cause. The spacecraft, called Beresheet, was in pieces scattered at the landing site, he said.
Doron nonetheless called the mission an "amazing success," for reaching the moon and coming so close to landing successfully.
"It is by far the smallest, cheapest spacecraft ever to get to the moon," he said. Beresheet was about the size of a washing machine.
The mishap occurred in front of a packed audience that included Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and was broadcast live on national television.
"We will try again," Netanyahu said. "We reached the moon, but we want to land more comfortably, and that is for the next time."
It had been hoped that the small robotic spacecraft, built by the nonprofit SpaceIL and state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries, would match a feat that has been achieved only by U.S., Russia and China.
The failure was a disappointing ending to a lunar voyage of 6.5 million kilometers (4 million miles), almost unprecedented in length and designed to conserve fuel and reduce price. The spacecraft hitched a ride on a SpaceX rocket launched from Florida in February.
[Image: 3-israelispace.jpg]

People watch the live broadcast of the SpaceIL spacecraft as it lost contact with Earth in Netanya, Israel, Thursday, April 11, 2019. An Israeli spacecraft has failed in its attempt to make history as the first privately funded lunar mission.The SpaceIL spacecraft lost contact with Earth late Thursday, just moments before it was to land on the moon, and scientists declared the mission a failure. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
[size=undefined]
For the past two months, Beresheet, which means "Genesis" or "In the Beginning," traveled around the Earth several times before entering lunar orbit.
Around 20 minutes before the scheduled landing, engine firings slowed Beresheet's descent. Engineers watched in silence as the craft, its movements streamed live on dozens of screens, glided toward a free-fall.
But then the screens showed the engine misfiring, and the velocity surging as it headed toward the lunar surface. Radio signals from the spacecraft, abruptly cut off.
Standing before darkened computer screens, controllers declared the mission a failure. The craft crashed near the historic Apollo landing sites.

President Reuven Rivlin hosted dozens of youngsters at his official residence, one of several celebrations scheduled across the country. The children, some wearing white and blue spacesuits, appeared confused as the crash unfolded.
"We are full of admiration for the wonderful people who brought the spacecraft to the moon," Rivlin said. "True, not as we had hoped, but we will succeed in the end."
Beresheet carried a small laser retroreflector from NASA intended to measure magnetic fields and provide insight on the moon's iron core. It also had a time capsule that included a Bible, Israeli cultural symbols and a picture of famed Israeli astronaut Ilan Ramon, who died in the crash of the U.S. space shuttle Columbia in 2003.
The head of NASA, Jim Bridenstine, said he regretted the mission didn't succeed, but "I have no doubt that Israel and SpaceIL will continue to explore and I look forward to celebrating their future achievements."
Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin expressed his regrets "for what almost was" and tweeted: "Never lose hope—Your hard work, team work, and innovation is inspiring to all!"
The Google Lunar X Prize Competition, which offered $20 million for the first privately funded venture to make it to the moon, is what first drove SpaceIL to get Beresheet off the ground.
[Image: 4-israelispace.jpg][/size]

A girl poses for a photo next to a poster of the SpaceIL spacecraft in Netanya, Thursday, April 11, 2019. An Israeli spacecraft has failed in its attempt to make history as the first privately funded lunar mission.The SpaceIL spacecraft lost contact with Earth late Thursday, just moments before it was to land on the moon, and scientists declared the mission a failure. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
[size=undefined]
Beresheet made the final cut, but after several deadline extensions, the competition ended last year without a winner.
SpaceIL pressed on with its dream, convinced the mission would help inspire Israel's next generation to study science and engineering. The $100 million mission was financed largely by Israeli billionaire Morris Kahn and a handful of other investors.
"The second I heard their dream, I wanted to support it," said Kahn. "I knew it would give us in Israel a sense of pride."
The XPrize Foundation congratulated the SpaceIL team despite the failed landing.
"We're extraordinarily proud they made it this far," said Peter Diamandis, XPrize founder.
Spacecraft crash more on other planets than they do on the moon, but the moon has had seen failed missions previously, said American University professor Howard McCurdy, who has written several books about space.
In the 1960s, before the Apollo lunar landings, NASA sent seven unmanned Surveyor flights to the moon and two failed, he said.
"What makes it hard is the conditions—the geological and atmospheric conditions are different on the moon and the planets than they are on Earth," McCurdy said. "It makes it really hard to test" the spacecraft's landing back on Earth.
Phil Larson of the University of Colorado, who was a space adviser in the Obama White House, said the Israeli effort underlines that "space is still extremely hard, and landing human made objects on other worlds is an utmost challenge."
But, he added, "While it failed to land successfully, overall it was a path-breaking and innovative project."[/size]



https://phys.org/news/2019-04-israeli-sp...-moon.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#13
APRIL 18, 2019
Israeli team investigating 'chain of events' in lunar crash

[Image: israeliteami.jpg]People watch the live broadcast of the SpaceIL spacecraft as it lost contact with Earth in Netanya, Israel, Thursday, April 11, 2019. An Israeli spacecraft has failed in its attempt to make history as the first privately funded lunar mission.The SpaceIL spacecraft lost contact with Earth late Thursday, just moments before it was to land on the moon, and scientists declared the mission a failure. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
The Israeli start-up behind last week's failed lunar landing said Thursday that it is still investigating a malfunction that caused the spacecraft to plummet to the moon's surface.

SpaceIL, the non-profit that undertook the lunar mission, said that engineers in mission control received a malfunction notification in the craft's inertial measurement unit, a critical part of its guidance system, during the lander's final descent.
The team issued an activation command, which triggered a "chain of events" culminating in the spacecraft's main engine failing, sending it slamming into the moon.
"We need to go in and understand the technical details inside in greater depth, but that's the sequence that happened in the telemetry," SpaceIL Chief Executive Ido Anteby told reporters in a telephone briefing.
"We have no assumption about the reason why this error happened," he said.
SpaceIL said it would continue to analyze the flight data to determine the cause of the fatal glitch and publish a formal assessment in the coming weeks.
The moonshot, the first by a privately funded venture, sought to make Israel the fourth country to land on the moon, after the Soviet Union, the United States and China.
SpaceIL was founded in 2011 and originally vied for Google's Lunar Xprize, a $20 million challenge for private companies to try to land on the moon. But the competition was scrapped by the tech giant in 2018 when none of the five companies appeared in reach of a predetermined deadline.


https://phys.org/news/2019-04-israeli-te...craft.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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