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Now for the Dance
#1
Always been a fan of beauty. This is about as exotic as it gets.
Sooo many beautiful women!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl9uWRu0fo4&t=56s
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
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#2
Get up on the dance floor and grab yourself a woman and all the little lasses go and find a young man.
gonna keep a steady beat guitar is a strummin' sweep the ladies off their feet and get up here and dance...

 sash!
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#3
That was cool!

Hillbilly Hare
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkiJDw1Kung
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#4
6 minutes of absolutely great stuff

Champions Boogie Woogie, Laroquebrou 2017
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#5
Old boy on the keys was really cutting it up as well. The whole band really!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#6
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#7
same old song and dance?  Arrow LilD

   Wednesday, November 27th, 2019, 01:22 am

Get up on the dance floor and grab yourself a woman and all the little lasses go and find a young man.
gonna keep a steady beat guitar is a strummin' sweep the ladies off their feet and get up here and dance...


[Image: Steven+Tyler+Sports+Illustrated+Swimsuit...htUT8l.jpg][/url]
DECEMBER 12, 2019
How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga
[Image: howhumanslea.jpg]Credit: University of Warwick
Psychologist observing two chimpanzees in a zoo have discovered that they performed a behaviour hitherto never seen, they coordinated together in a rhythmic social ritual.

Two chimpanzees housed in a zoo in the US have sparked the question about how human dance evolved after being observed performing a duo dance-like behaviour, similar to a human conga-line.
In the paper "Coupled whole-body rhythmic entrainment between two chimpanzees" published today, the 12th of December in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers led by the University of Warwick found the levels of motoric co-ordination, synchrony and rhythm between the two female chimpanzees matched the levels shown by orchestra players performing the same musical piece.
Other species have been shown to be able to entertain by moving to the pace of a rhythmic tempo by an external stimulus and solo individuals, however this is the first time it hasn't been triggered by nonhuman partners or signals.
Although the newly described behaviour probably represents a new form in captivity in this great ape species, the behaviour forces scientists interested in the evolution of human dance to consider new conditions that may have catalysed the emergence of one of human's most exuberant and richest forms of expression.
Dr. Adriano Lameira, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick comments:
"Dance is an icon of human expression. Despite astounding diversity around the world's cultures and dazzling abundance of reminiscent animal systems, the evolution of dance in the human clade remains obscure.


[Image: 41598_2019_55360_Fig2_HTML.png?as=webp]
"Dance requires individuals to interactively synchronize their whole-body tempo to their partner's, with near-perfect precision, this explains why no dance forms were present amongst nonhuman primates. Critically, this is evidence for conjoined full-body rhythmic entrainment in great apes that could help reconstruct possible proto-stages of human dance is still lacking."
The researchers report an endogenously-effected case of ritualized dance-like behaviour between two captive chimpanzees—synchronized bipedalism. By studying videos they revealed that synchronisation between individuals was non-random, predictable, phase concordant, maintained with instantaneous centi-second precision and jointly regulated, with individuals also taking turns as "pace-makers."




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The human brain is prepared to follow the rhythm of a song or of a dance



[b]More information:[/b] Lameira, A.R., Eerola, T. & Ravignani, A. Coupled whole-body rhythmic entrainment between two chimpanzees. Scientific Reports 9, 18914 (2019) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-55360-y
[b]Journal information:[/b] Scientific Reports 

Provided by University of Warwick



https://phys.org/news/2019-12-humans-lea...conga.html


[Image: header-2c7da0708d3d7539cf612bcb0d72c930.svg]




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  • Open Access

  • [url=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-55360-y#article-info]Published: 12 December 2019
Coupled whole-body rhythmic entrainment between two chimpanzees Scientific Reports [b]volume 9[/b], Article number: 18914 (2019) Cite this article
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[*]
Abstract
Dance is an icon of human expression. Despite astounding diversity around the world’s cultures and dazzling abundance of reminiscent animal systems, the evolution of dance in the human clade remains obscure. Dance requires individuals to interactively synchronize their whole-body tempo to their partner’s, with near-perfect precision. This capacity is motorically-heavy, engaging multiple neural circuitries, but also dependent on an acute socio-emotional bond between partners. Hitherto, these factors helped explain why no dance forms were present amongst nonhuman primates. Critically, evidence for conjoined full-body rhythmic entrainment in great apes that could help reconstruct possible proto-stages of human dance is still lacking. Here, we report an endogenously-effected case of ritualized dance-like behaviour between two captive chimpanzees – synchronized bipedalism. We submitted video recordings to rigorous time-series analysis and circular statistics. We found that individual step tempo was within the genus’ range of “solo” bipedalism. Between-individual analyses, however, revealed that synchronisation between individuals was non-random, predictable, phase concordant, maintained with instantaneous centi-second precision and jointly regulated, with individuals also taking turns as “pace-makers”. No function was apparent besides the behaviour’s putative positive social affiliation. Our analyses show a first case of spontaneous whole-body entrainment between two ape peers, thus providing tentative empirical evidence for phylogenies of human dance. Human proto-dance, we argue, may have been rooted in mechanisms of social cohesion among small groups that might have granted stress-releasing benefits via gait-synchrony and mutual-touch. An external sound/musical beat may have been initially uninvolved. We discuss dance evolution as driven by ecologically-, socially- and/or culturally-imposed “captivity”.

Introduction
Dance is one of the richest facets of human expression. A staggering abundance of forms can be found across the world’s cultures (UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List), together with a plethora of mesmerizing analogous performances across the animal world1,2,3,4,5,6. Yet, there seem to exist no parallel behaviours among our closest relatives, the (nonhuman) great apes, calling into question how and why this trait emerged within the terminal branch of our phylogenetic tree and subsequently evolved so expansively7,8,9.


DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-55360-y


[Image: 2622759_110917-wls-ap-steven-tyler-img.j...0&r=16%3A9]
DECEMBER 12, 2019
Examining how primates make vowel sounds pushes timeline for speech evolution back by 27 million years
[*]by Thomas R. Sawallis and Louis-Jean Boë, The Conversation
[*][Image: examininghow.jpg]Baboons make sounds, but how does it relate to human speech? Credit: Creative Wrights/Shutterstock.com
Sound doesn't fossilize. Language doesn't either.

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#8
[Image: agalacticdan.jpg]

Image: The galactic dance of NGC 5394 and NGC 5395
"Everything is determined by forces over which we have no control... Human beings, vegetables, or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper," Albert Einstein wrote.


Galaxies lead a graceful existence on cosmic timescales. Over millions of years, they can engage in elaborate dances that produce some of nature's most exquisite grand designs. Few are as captivating as the galactic duo known as NGC 5394/5, sometimes nicknamed the Heron Galaxy. This image, obtained by the Gemini Observatory of NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, captures a snapshot of this compelling interacting pair.
The existence of the universe is dependent upon interactions—from the tiniest subatomic particles to the largest clusters of galaxies. At galactic scales, interactions can take millions of years to unfold, a process seen in this image of two galaxies released today by the Gemini Observatory. The new image captures the slow and intimate dance of a pair of galaxies some 160 million light-years distant and reveals the sparkle of subsequent star formation fueled by the pair's interactions.

The two galaxies, astronomers have concluded, have already collided at least once. However, galactic collisions can be a lengthy process of successive gravitational encounters, which, over time, can morph the galaxies into exotic, unrecognizable forms. These galaxies, as in all galactic collisions, are engaged in a ghostly dance as the distances between the stars in each galaxy preclude actual stellar collisions and their overall shapes are deformed only by each galaxy's gravity.

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This 10 second video zooms into the Gemini Observatory image of NGC 5394/5395, revealing the interaction of the galaxy pair. Credit: NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory/Gemini Observatory/AURA

One byproduct of the turbulence caused by the interaction is the coalescence of hydrogen gas into regions of star formation. In this image, these stellar nurseries are revealed in the form of the reddish clumps scattered in a ring-like fashion in the larger galaxy (and a few in the smaller galaxy). Also visible is a dusty ring seen in silhouette against the backdrop of the larger galaxy. A similar ring structure is seen in a previous image from the Gemini Observatory, likely the result of another interacting galactic pair.

A well-known target for amateur astronomers, the light from NGC 5394/5 first piqued humanity's interest when it was observed by William Herschel in 1787. Herschel used his giant 20-foot-long telescope to discover the two galaxies in the same year that he discovered two moons of Uranus. Many stargazers today imagine the two galaxies as a Heron. In this interpretation, the larger galaxy is the bird's body and the smaller one is its head—with its beak preying upon a fish-like background galaxy.
NGC 5394 and NGC 5395, also known collectively known as Arp 84 or the Heron Galaxy, are interacting spiral galaxies 160 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Canes Venatici. The larger galaxy, NGC 5395 (on the left), is 140,000 light-years across and the smaller one, NGC 5394, is 90,000 light-years across.


https://phys.org/news/2019-12-image-galactic-ngc.html


Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#9
DECEMBER 24, 2019 REPORT
Chimpanzees spontaneously dance to music
by Bob Yirka , Phys.org
[Image: 5e01ecb33c47e.jpg]A male chimpanzee making a rhythmic display at the enclosure in the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Credit: Yuko Hattori.
A pair of researchers at Kyoto University has found that chimpanzees will spontaneously dance to music. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Yuko Hattori and Masaki Tomonaga describe observing spontaneous dancing in chimps and how one chimp behaved when tested on dancing tendencies.

Music tends to make people move. Whether tapping out a beat, swaying or outright dancing—people respond. Prior research has shown that some animals, such as cockatoos, tend to move when they hear music, too. In this new effort, the researchers built on a recent report of chimpanzees spontaneously dancing in a sort of conga line. They noted that prior research has also found that chimps engage in dance-like behaviors sometimes when it rains, or when they are near a waterfall.
The initial experiment by the researchers involved trying to teach an adult female to keep a beat—that experiment did not go according to plan, but the researchers noticed that another nearby chimp would start to dance whenever they played music. Intrigued, the researchers played music to a group of chimps (three adult males and four females) and found that all of the chimps responded to the music by moving in dance-like ways—though the degree to which they danced varied greatly between them. Overall, they found that the males tended to dance more than the females. They also found that the chimps had different moves—some swayed, some knocked on the walls of their enclosure and one even tapped her foot. They also noted that some of the males hooted along with the music.
To learn more about dancing with chimps, the researchers isolated one of them—a male called Akira. He was chosen because he danced the most among those the team was studying. He was subjected to periods of piano music with a repetitive bass note for 24 days. He was also subjected to random notes to find out if he was responding to the music or the beat. The researchers report that Akira danced whenever music was played regardless of its tempo—and he danced just as much. The researchers were not able to explain why music made the chimps dance but suggest further study could help learn about the evolution of dance in humans.
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Rhythmic swaying in bipedal (upright) posture. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910318116
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Rhythmic swaying in quadrupedal posture. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910318116
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Partial body rhythmic movement (hand clapping). Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910318116




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Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves



[b]More information:[/b] Yuko Hattori et al. Rhythmic swaying induced by sound in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910318116
[b]Journal information:[/b] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences



https://phys.org/news/2019-12-chimpanzee...music.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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