Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
the problem with science
#1
Academia decrees that only people with Degrees and Doctorates are permitted to practice
science and they have two very important and quite simple filters in place to ensure that
independent research is suppressed: One; Credentials; and Two; Peer Review; because no matter
what your evidence or theories are, nothing gets past peer review, but you cannot receive peer
review without first having credentials but of course in order to get credentials you need to tow
the party line and embrace the accepted theories or you simply won’t get your degree in the first
place. So what do you do? Remember Catch 22? It’s actually quite brilliant in its simplicity – in
some scary way.
Again this is a ridiculous and extraordinarily unscientific approach to science because science
is something that anyone can study and learn. All that is needed is for one to possess a keen and
analytical mind. A person does not need a degree to educate oneself or record facts, or to conduct
experiments, observe their outcomes and think about them in a critical way. In a truly free and
open society where the pursuit of true knowledge is nurtured, science, by its very basic fabric,
needs to be part of the free democratic process and all theories examined. Science was never
designed to be an ‘elitist club’ presided over by closed minds. Such behavior is truly irresponsible
and can only ever serve as a hindrance to legitimate research and the genuine pursuit of real
truths. Science cannot properly function as an Authoritarian Regime.
more or less hudsons bay again
Reply
#2
:uni: Now...theoretically it is possible that certain psychoactive substances can enable the mind to leap-frog over much of the drudge work associated with the learning curve, but even there, the individual has to possess a rich vocabulary, like Alan Watts... http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/LSD/jccontnt.htm

Quote:...here the depth of light and structure in a bursting bud go on forever. There is time to see them, time for the whole intricacy of veins and capillaries to develop in consciousness, time to see down and down into the shape of greenness, which is not green at all, but a whole spectrum generalizing itself as green—purple, gold, the sunlit turquoise of the ocean, the intense luminescence of the emerald. I cannot decide where shape ends and color begins. The bud has opened and the fresh leaves fan out and curve back with a gesture which is unmistakably communicative but does not say anything except, "Thus!" And somehow that is quite satisfactory, even startlingly clear. The meaning is transparent in the same way that the color and the texture are transparent, with light which does not seem to fall upon surfaces from above but to be right inside the structure and color. Which is of course where it is, for light is an inseparable trinity of sun, object, and eye, and the chemistry of the leaf is its color, its light.
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/LSD/jcbody.htm
Reply
#3
interesting analysis, the discovers of the wheel and agriculture might disagree though, i always thought my alter ego was nazi. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/cheers.gif" alt="Cheers" title="cheers" />
more or less hudsons bay again
Reply
#4
Let me offer an anecdote illustrating my own disillusionment with science......

I went to college with the aim of becoming a biology teacher in the secondary school system. The curriculum was far more difficult than I expected, but I made it into the last term of the 3rd year...

OK...yes...I admit I was thrown for a loop earlier in a lab credit which involved barrels full of pickled cats. Their veins and arteries had been injected with blue and red latex. The task was to trace the circulatory system to the limits of the equipment (scalpels and needle probes). The smell was horrible, but barely tolerable, as I identified the vena cava...noting a peculiar bulge as it entered the heart......

...later there was an exercise which, in retrospect, was utterly diabolical......
The professor was a bespectacled nice lady with her hair in a bun.
She took a live frog and demonstrated the "pithing" technique...
Grasp the frog at the curves of the neck bones...
Manually identify the spinal/skull junction...
Insert the needle probe smartly into the depression...
Rapidly rotate the instrument so that the brain is destroyed.

NOW

Take the still living frog
and pin its arms and legs to a wax covered dissecting tray.

NOW

Section the frog's chest with the scalpel,
and cut out the beating heart.
Connect the musculature to the hooked threads of the cylinder recorder.
Record beats/amplitude/min...

I thought it was pretty bizarre, but I rationalized and preserved my sanity by consoling myself that the frog was quite senseless...
...and the waveforms were...fascinating......

In the 3rd term, I took Human Anatomy and Physiology.
In the main textbook is a drawing showing a cat with heavy electrical cables attached to its head.
The caption says "The student may deliver any level of punishment desired."

I switched my major to English Lit...William Blake..."Hungry clouds swag on the deep..."
Reply
#5
Quote:Let me offer an anecdote illustrating my own disillusionment with science......

I went to college with the aim of becoming a biology teacher in the secondary school system. The curriculum was far more difficult than I expected, but I made it into the last term of the 3rd year...

OK...yes...I admit I was thrown for a loop earlier in a lab credit which involved barrels full of pickled cats. Their veins and arteries had been injected with blue and red latex. The task was to trace the circulatory system to the limits of the equipment (scalpels and needle probes). The smell was horrible, but barely tolerable, as I identified the vena cava...noting a peculiar bulge as it entered the heart......

...later there was an exercise which, in retrospect, was utterly diabolical......
The professor was a bespectacled nice lady with her hair in a bun.
She took a live frog and demonstrated the "pithing" technique...
Grasp the frog at the curves of the neck bones...
Manually identify the spinal/skull junction...
Insert the needle probe smartly into the depression...
Rapidly rotate the instrument so that the brain is destroyed.

NOW

Take the still living frog
and pin its arms and legs to a wax covered dissecting tray.

NOW

Section the frog's chest with the scalpel,
and cut out the beating heart.
Connect the musculature to the hooked threads of the cylinder recorder.
Record beats/amplitude/min...

I thought it was pretty bizarre, but I rationalized and preserved my sanity by consoling myself that the frog was quite senseless...
...and the waveforms were...fascinating......

In the 3rd term, I took Human Anatomy and Physiology.
In the main textbook is a drawing showing a cat with heavy electrical cables attached to its head.
The caption says "The student may deliver any level of punishment desired."

I switched my major to English Lit...William Blake..."Hungry clouds swag on the deep..."

I find that a bit odd, mabe things have changed a bit since then, I dont know though as Im not going into biology. Perhaps my brother can say later as thats what he is doing.

I can say I at least somewhat agree here. However, you dont have to embrace the theories to think what you wish. I will go through college and then I will probably end up doing crazy stuff in my garage at home even though it may not be mainstream.

Anyway, what needs to happen is for some experiments to be based on what people say they think they know(ie, this guy saw this crazy thing happen, blah blah... and of course after thorough work to make sure it isnt actually just made up like some stuff is), instead of it being ignored because it may be a dead end. I dont know how many dead end studies there have been in science, but I would assume quite a few.
Quote:No mountain is too tall if your first step is belief. -Anonymous
...Because even if there were no artifacts anywhere, not studying things of interest is an extreme disservice to science. -Tarius
Reply
#6
http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/Articl ... ianism.htm
<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/dunno.gif" alt="Dunno" title="dunno" />
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#7
Quote:The caption says "The student may deliver any level of punishment desired."
Hopefully, that would include no punishment ...
e4e5Qh5Ke7Qe5#
Reply
#8
i too started with biology as a goal, but the narrow mindedness of most disciplines led me to the conclusion that liberal arts was the only way to go. i was able to use credits from interesting stuff like MUSIC, sociology, psychology, history, geography, etc. to get a real education, instead of just a position within the system that was limited by specalization or patronage
more or less hudsons bay again
Reply
#9
I, too, started with biology as a major interest-botanical illustration. Then segued into drafting then architecture then... Wall mind! then I morphed into professional studentism... got to clean up my credits and turn them into something that counts for something but it never got me anywhere but totally mentally turned on and into plenty of different worlds.

I always wanted to teach but knew the systems were rigged except in college. Too many tighty whiteys though they come in all colors-tighty righties. I'm not a team or a system player it seems. I can't go along with any agendas especially any that I don't know about or cause harm-so that pushed out for me, medicine,

from illustrating creation to designing and creating my self. Wub
&quot;Confusion... first sign of a bad relationship-whether personal, societal or governmental&quot;
Reply
#10
Quote:Whistle almon...almon...almon......

Is your alter-ego a teenage Maoist in The Cultural Revolution?

Is your guru Chocolate Thunder
who would take a vinyl record
zip the needle across the grooves
and call it MUSIC???

If you have a working knowledge of the scientific method...
observationhypothesis-theorem--law
then you have to have an educational background including scientific nomenclature.
You have to complete years of laboratory work in order to understand even the rudiments of discoveries made by Great Minds.
Ass kissing, Kalter. You left out the part about kissing wrinkled old tenured professorial asses.
Reply
#11
Almon,
I think they missed the original point. Science is a guild. You have to pay your dues, follow the rules, be accepted, before you can say anything off the beaten track. And then, if it doesn't follow the mainstream, then you are shunted aside and ignored.

Some here haven't followed the "righteous path" of scientific inquiry, but instead educated themselves and discovered things on their own. I use Mars as the main evidence. Just because you have a degree doesn't mean you can interpret pictures better than anyone here. We look very carefully, and we find things, but the mainstream can't see them, because it isn't necessarily in their own interest or something. Who is the scientist? We found water a long time ago. Now they find water but I didn't see anyone here or even the whole website getting any credit. Imagine that. I've always thought of you as a reactionary, but maybe there is hope for you. Welcome to the Hidden Mission.
&quot;Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.&quot; --Aldous Huxley
Reply
#12
and sometimes if you're too good of a scientist it will get you killed. Think Reich. or destroyed. Think Tesla.
&quot;Confusion... first sign of a bad relationship-whether personal, societal or governmental&quot;
Reply
#13
Has anyone ever seen HP Lovecraft's "Reanimator" ?
...read Frankenstein......Dr Jekyll & Mr. Hyde ?

Thank God it's science fiction, right ?

Well, here's the state of the art in 1940 USSR...and it garners the admiration of the famous narrator...
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... =firefox-a

<img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smoke.gif" alt="Smoke" title="smoke" /> What progress has been made over the last 60 years?

[Image: gamma5.jpeg]
Reply
#14
[quote author="Kalter Rauch"]Has anyone ever seen HP Lovecraft's "Reanimator" ?
...read Frankenstein......Dr Jekyll & Mr. Hyde ?

Thank God it's science fiction, right ?

Well, here's the state of the art in 1940 USSR...and it garners the admiration of the famous narrator...
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... =firefox-a

Rofl
Quote:No mountain is too tall if your first step is belief. -Anonymous
...Because even if there were no artifacts anywhere, not studying things of interest is an extreme disservice to science. -Tarius
Reply
#15
Quote:In a truly free and
open society where the pursuit of true knowledge is nurtured, science, by its very basic fabric,
needs to be part of the free democratic process and all theories examined. Science was never
designed to be an ‘elitist club’ presided over by closed minds.

Science as we know it is all about control of the masses by controlling the data and has nothing to do with the pursuit of knowledge. That is a myth.
~~~~~ ** ~~~~~&nbsp; <br />[Image: bee.gif]<br />We make decisions or we make excuses ~~ it's always our choice.
Reply
#16
[quote]I saw Beyond Reanimator. Thankfully there are not alot of half dead corpses running around. Although that would be a good way to create an army of ghouls or zombies. Hmm2
A month ago I saw someone who fits the bill.
Late at night...walking down the sidewalk.
I saw a guy who smiled as we passed.
I shuddered, because his face was like a grinning skull of mummified skin.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)