Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 1 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Starting up a new local chapter of Ducks Unlimited
#67
Out collecting donations for our DU banquet over the last week, and again this morning.
Got one $500 donation, two more Doctors committed to large donations soon.
Gun raffle ticket sales of $190, Battery tender, Duck decoys, Gift card from auto body shop for products, $30 dollar gift cards from one local restaurant.
Was a good start.
7 weeks to go!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#68
Going out this early afternoon to do maintenance on several Wood Duck nesting boxes at Reid Valley Ranch. Gonna stop by to see the Grand Matriarch of the clan that owns the valley.
Wonderful old lady! She always expects a visit.
Once I start catching a few fish, I always like to take her some when I go up there for whatever reason.

Today is a little chilly. Snowed a bit last night, bit there's still some lingering on the ground around the house, but....I heard Robins singing this morning, so it is actually Spring.

In years past I would have already been on the river fishing by now, but I no longer feel driven to face anything but optimum conditions on the water, and that means at least a warm Sun keeping the fingers and nose comfortable.

I can remember 15 years ago having a snowy first day of Memorial day weekend, and turning 90* the first day back to work. That was one of the hottest Summers I can ever remember since we've lived here, but the last two have been near the coolest we've seen. Think I prefer the cooler ones!
Still, I like T shirts and shorts in their season. I'm sure we'll have our share of those kinds of days ahead of us as always!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#69
Our weather has been odd but not too strange for a strong El Nino. The worst right now is the wind. Every freaking day.
Don't believe anything they say. <br />And at the same time, <br />Don't believe that they say anything without a reason. <br />---Immanuel Kant
Reply
#70
A couple of months ago things looked like this.
[Image: IMG_1701.jpg]

Today the same spot looked like this. The Scouts are back at work for conservation!
[Image: IMG_1702_1.jpg]

Come on guys, we can't spend all our time at the computer. You got to get out and DO something!

Oh! BTW:
Gonna be starting a marathon group effort to build another 48 Wood Duck Nesting Boxes next week.
Gonna be many Girl Scouts involved on that one!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#71
All wood picked up yesterday, all table saw cuts made today.
To-length cuts, miters and bevels to be made tomorrow on the chop saw.
Day after will see the holes in front doors cut, and interior netting (DUCK LADDERS) stapled in after that.

180 boxes will have been installed upon completion.

Still short of my goal to produce 2000 Wood Duck chicks each season, but very, very close at ten chicks produced per box. Won't be satisfied until I have doubled the breeding pairs of wild Wood Ducks in E Idaho.
It's doable, and I may be close in another five years!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#72
Wife and kids surprised the old man with a way early Father's Day gift!
[Image: raven_1.jpg]
Need a new deep cell 12 volt battery as well
Been wanting a sporting clay bird launcher for a couple of years.
Saturday afternoons across the street over the Snake river, the whole family and a few friends will be practicing our
shooting.
Weber will be going, and the Char Broil BBQ as well. Chicken and Ribs!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#73
FSB...do you know how to make a LOUD pop with your tongue?
I learned it when I was ~5...fun in grade school class......
Reply
#74
(03-22-2017, 05:13 AM)Kalter Rauch Wrote: FSB...do you know how to make a LOUD pop with your tongue?
I learned it when I was ~5...fun in grade school class......

Ah! But Kalter, the old bird finger on the inside of your cheek made an even louder 'Pop'.

Of course, not to be confused with the satisfaction of seeing the blurr of a clay target explode into a cloud of dust before the gun.

And besides, I have to practice up my skills so I can kick Wook's hind end on the range if ever he should get back to Idaho!
I owe him one!
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#75
(03-22-2017, 03:33 AM)Fsbirdhouse Wrote: Wife and kids surprised the old man with a way early Father's Day gift!
[Image: raven_1.jpg]
Need a new deep cell 12 volt battery as well
Been wanting a sporting clay bird launcher for a couple of years.
Saturday afternoons across the street over the Snake river, the whole family and a few friends will be practicing our
shooting.
Weber will be going, and the Char Broil BBQ as well. Chicken and Ribs!

Sweet !!
Hi

I don't get done with dialysis school until end of April
if things go as planned
Sheep
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#76
So, the marathon session of new Wood Duck boxes are just finished today. 48 total.
No help presented itself this time, as it would have meant working outside in the driveway and it's been pouring down rain for several days.
That's alright, as it's a labor of love for me, and they are all done very uniformly. They will all be going to our DU banquet Saturday after this coming on a raffle scheme.
Making money for the DU national to preserve Wetlands, and Wood Duck homes here locally.
A win, win.
[Image: IMG_1725.jpg]
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#77
Great use of time and talent Applause Applause Applause

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Morning Light, No sensation to compare to this, suspended animation, state of bliss, I keep my eyes on the circling sky, tongue tied and twisted just and Earth Bound Martian I" Learning to Fly Pink Floyd [Video: https://vimeo.com/144891474]
Reply
#78
Thanks Bob!

Wish I'd lost a few pounds doing it.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#79
Posted by Fsbirdhouse - 1 hour ago
Thanks Bob!

Wish I'd lost a few pounds doing it.
Posted by rhw007 - 5 hours ago
Great use of time and talent [Image: applause.gif] [Image: applause.gif] [Image: applause.gif]

Bob... [Image: ninja.gif] [Image: alien2.gif]



One step closer to an 'exercise pill'  youareaduck
April 25, 2017

Suppressing production of the protein myostatin enhances muscle mass and leads to significant improvements in markers of heart and kidney health, according to a study conducted in mice. Joshua T. Butcher, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the Vascular Biology Center at Augusta University, will present the work at the American Physiological Society's annual meeting during the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting, to be held April 22-26 in Chicago.


Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-04-c...l.html#jCp


Wook...one of my son's several nicknames is Skeet!  Holycowsmile

[Image: raven_1.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#80
Well the DU banquet is behind us for another year now, but this last one was a good pay-off for Jan and I.
She won a Smith & Wesson 40 S&W caliber auto handgun, and I won our second TriStar 20 Gauge gas Auto loader shotgun. A few other odds and ends as well, but I don't remember.
We have finally arrived at that happy state of a full gun safe. No more room but for a few boxes of ammo.

The Son-in-Law won the biggest prize of all with a 42 gun safe. Monster thing that took a crew of men to move.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#81
Well
looking at the Weather Channel this Morning
I hope FSB
does not have Ducks and Fish
in Front Yard .

Hi
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#82
Warming weather could bring the river up higher, but I think they have lowered the upstream reservoirs enough to handle the expected run-off.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#83
Snow !
Big flakes .
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#84
Yup!
Snowed here today as well, but just little flakes.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#85
I'm sweating here in 80+ F weather and likely 90+ tomorrow then back down to 60F high and 40 low with rain next 6 days after Friday

Bob... Ninja Alien2
"The Morning Light, No sensation to compare to this, suspended animation, state of bliss, I keep my eyes on the circling sky, tongue tied and twisted just and Earth Bound Martian I" Learning to Fly Pink Floyd [Video: https://vimeo.com/144891474]
Reply
#86
Crazy deal Bob,
We are up and down here.
80*+ here two weeks ago, and yesterday at 11:00 AM I had to wear a jacket and heavy gloves while mowing the lawn.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#87
Speaking of weather:

Jim  Here is a factoid for your next chapter meeting... so you can sound like Cliff Clavin!

And then there's another factoid after some rum... Warning! Expletives!!!
LilD 



Genetic analysis of New World birds confirms untested evolutionary assumption
May 30, 2017

[Image: duck.jpg]
Credit: CC0 Public Domain
Biologists have always been fascinated by the diversity and changeability of life on Earth and have attempted to answer a fundamental question: How do new species originate?



An implicit assumption in the discipline of speciation biology is that genetic differences between populations of animals and plants in a given species are important drivers of new species formation and are a key to understanding evolution.
But that assumption has never been rigorously tested, until now, according to University of Michigan evolutionary biologist Michael Harvey, first author of a paper published online May 30 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Harvey and colleagues compiled and analyzed an unprecedented data set containing genetic sequences from 17,000 individuals in 173 New World bird species, ranging from ducks and owls to swallows and sparrows.
They demonstrated that species showing faster rates of genetic differentiation between populations are more likely to produce greater numbers of species over long evolutionary timescales.
"Our results are of fundamental significance because there are researchers across the world studying speciation, and many of them investigate genetic differences between populations that are in the process of forming new species," said Harvey, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, in the laboratory of Daniel Rabosky.
"These researchers assume those genetic differences are important for evolution, but this has never been shown in a satisfactory way. We are the first to show that the differences between populations studied by speciation biologists have been fundamental determinants of the formation of the diversity of life."
The researchers measured the rate at which genetic differences accumulated between populations in each of the 173 bird species. They then compared the rate of population differentiation to the probability that each bird species would form new species over time. This probability was based on the evolutionary track record of each species: How many species did its ancestors produce over the history of avian diversity?
They found that the rate of genetic differentiation within species is positively correlated with the rate of new species formation. The two rates were more tightly linked in tropical species than in temperate species.
The study provides the first large-scale test of the link between population differentiation rates and speciation rates. The results confirm the evolutionary importance of population genetic differentiation.
However, genetic differences do not guarantee evolutionary success. Harvey and his colleagues found that the correlation between population genetic differentiation and species formation was imperfect, which suggests that other factors besides differentiation may be important in determining how many new species are produced.
They also found that the emergence of new populations within a species occurs at least three times faster than new species develop, suggesting that most differences between populations will not last long enough to impact species diversity.
"Overall, however, the study confirms the long-held assumption that the genetic differences between populations of a given species might predict its probability of contributing to the diversity of life," Harvey said.
Other New World birds analyzed in the study include parrots, woodpeckers, toucans, hummingbirds, blackbirds, tanagers, warblers, thrushes, wrens, chickadees, jays and flycatchers.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Long-held assumption about emergence of new species questioned
More information: Positive association between population genetic differentiation and speciation rates in New World birds, PNASDOI: 10.1073/pnas.1617397114 , http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/0...4.abstract 
Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: University of Michigan



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-genetic-an...d.html#jCp[/url]

 Factoids for Cheers Un-limited
 Food-smiley-004
Where everybody knows your name.

 Four Ducks Sake!!!
Fowl-mouthed study finds that diet shaped duck, goose beaks

May 30, 2017



[Image: fowlmoutheds.jpg]
Waterfowl beaks vary along a duck-to-goose gradient (left to right), primarily because of differences in diet. Credit: Aaron Olsen
From Charles Darwin's famous finches to a new study that takes a rare look at a common order of birds—waterfowl—evolution has a tendency to reveals itself through bird beaks.




And this new study confirms through a rigorous analysis that the main evolutionary force driving the shape of duck, goose and other waterfowl beaks is their diet.
"This is the most comprehensive look to date at the relationship between diet and beak shape," said Aaron Olsen, author of the study in Functional Ecology and a postdoctoral researcher in Brown University's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
"Waterfowl have really interesting beaks relative to other birds," Olsen said. "They are very curvy with very diverse shapes."
Working at the University of Chicago and the Field Museum of Natural History, Olsen sought to determine what accounts for that diversity.
He expected that diet might play a substantial role, but rather than just compare simple dietary categories with beak caliper measurements as many naturalists have, he engaged in a more detailed analysis. He carefully measured the 3-D form of the beaks of 136 specimens of waterfowl, covering 51 species and 46 genera, including two extinct species. One fossil, Presbyornis, dates back tens of millions of years. Then he paired those measurements with detailed data that he gathered from the research literature on the diet of each bird.
Regardless of his expectation, if diet and beak shape had little to do with each other, the math would have yielded low correlations.
"What this analysis asks is, 'What are the patterns of correlation between these two datasets?'," Olsen said. "What's nice about that is you are going in a little bit naively about the relationship between the two."
More for pruning than preening
But the mathematical result was a strong correlation between dietary preferences and beak shape. It makes physical sense, Olsen said. Ducks, which primarily filter-feed little bugs and seeds from the water, have relatively long, wide-tipped bills that can bring in a lot of water. Geese, which evolved to prefer the leaves and roots of plants over filter feeding (though some still do), have shorter, narrower beaks that give geese a more forceful bite for pruning tough plant parts.
The correlation is so strong, Olsen said, that diet likely dominates other influencers of beak shape that researchers have demonstrated, such as preening and shedding body heat. But Olsen said his analysis doesn't preclude those factors from still having roles, too.
Duck then goose
The data Olsen gathered, combined with several lines of prior research, also led him to hypothesize that the early ancestors of modern ducks, geese and other waterfowl were duck-like. Geese-like beaks are newer phenomena, though they've evolved several times in several places.
First of all, Olsen said, a mathematical reconstruction he performed that accounted for modern waterfowl and the early ancestor in the waterfowl phylogenetic (or evolutionary family) tree, Presbyornis, showed that the duck-like beak is the most likely ancestral form. Moreover, the widespread emergence of grasses occurred after the origin of waterfowl, supporting a later origin for geese within waterfowl.
The other extinct specimen whose bill Olsen surveyed, the fern-eating moa-nalos goose, may be a good example of the kind of transition he suspects played out multiple times over waterfowl's evolutionary history. Other researchers have shown the moa-nalos likely had a duck-like ancestor, but after its ancestors ended up in Hawaii, it adapted to its final plant-eating status by evolving goose-like features over time.
All that said, Olsen acknowledges his assessment of waterfowl lineage remains an open hypothesis. He said he invites further research, even if it ultimately ruffles his feathers.
"I would love to see someone publish a paper and argue the opposite," he said.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Up to 600 waterfowl die in western Idaho from avian cholera
More information: Functional Ecology (2017). DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12890 
Journal reference: Functional Ecology [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided by: Brown University



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-fowl-mouth...s.html#jCp[url=https://phys.org/news/2017-05-fowl-mouthed-diet-duck-goose-beaks.html#jCp]


Be the duck-whisperer... lol.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#88
Holy Quack!!! 

youareaduck 
Quote:Speaking of Unlimited

Jim  Here is a factoid for your next chapter meeting... so you can sound like Cliff Clavin!

And then there's another factoid after some rum... Warning! DuxEATives !!!
[Image: lilD.gif] 

Ducks Seen Murdering, Snacking on Fledglings

It’s the first time mallards have been documented as killers.
BY KELSEY KENNEDY 
JUNE 30, 2017


[Image: image.jpg]
Cold-blooded baby bird killers. MAX PIXEL/PUBLIC DOMAIN

MALLARD DUCKS DON’T SEEM LIKE particularly vicious animals. Their chicks are adorably awkward and fluffy, and they stick their butts in the air while they’re looking for food. But not all ducks are content to look for plants on the bottom of a pond. Some ducks, such as some mallards in Romania, for example, have developed a taste for other birds.

The ducks were spotted by researchers from the University of Cambridge and Romania’s Veterinary and Food Safety Authority at a reservoir last summer. They noticed one adult and ten juvenile mallards along the shore, “vigorously shaking” the vegetation. But then the adult started shaking its head and squishing whatever was in its beak. It turned out to be a fledgling Grey Wagtail. After a struggle with the fledgling’s wings, the adult managed to gulp down the poor wagtail whole.
But the mallards weren’t done. They went back to the vegetation and flushed out another bird, this time a Black Redstart fledgling, and the juvenile mallards either drowned the fledgling or ate it. Then, the researchers write, they “emerged onto a floating tree trunk for basking and preening as the group entered a phase of rest.”

Ducks are known omnivores that sometimes eat fish or crabs when they can’t get enough protein in their diet otherwise. But this is the first time they’ve been documented as cold-blooded killers. “The fact that these individuals seem to have learnt how to hunt birds is pretty extraordinary,” Silviu Petrovan, a coauthor of the report, told the BBC. “Potentially there is quite a lot of pressure for those fast-growing juveniles to get animal protein intake, and therefore they are looking at opportunities to supplement that.” Ducks haven’t evolved to eat other birds, which is why it was so hard for the adult to get that wagtail down. Also, said Petrovan, “digesting bones and feathers – that’s not something that mallards have really evolved to do.”

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/car...nian-ducks




 Factoids for Cheers Un-limited
 [Image: food-smiley-004.gif] 
Where everybody knows your name.

 Four Ducks Sake!!!


With this new factoid ...


Itza common Sense us Arrow  the next time they take a fowl-life census they should account for Kilo-Dux.

The Kilo-Dux a Crux in the Quantum Flux



Yell Nick Mc Wa Wa
Be the duck-whisperer... lol.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#89
Quote:[Image: clavin-jeopardy-cheers_6.jpg]

"Our research also shows that the ruddy shelduck has a faster climb rate than the bar-headed goose 

[Image: in+cockpit+1.png]

- the only waterfowl known to fly even higher."

[Image: i+love+it.png]
Ruddy Shelduck and the Bar-Headed Geese present:

[Image: 2427565d90b44bf1d0dd8727fc3e9156--cheers...nna-tv.jpg]
A Cliff Claven Factoid.
Food-smiley-004


High-flying ducks cross Himalayas
September 5, 2017

[Image: highflyingdu.jpg]
Ruddy shelducks avoid peaks like Mount Everest when the pass through the Himalayas. Credit: University of Exeter
A high-flying duck species reaches altitudes of up to 6,800 metres (22,000 feet) to cross the Himalayas, new research shows.



Ruddy shelducks are known to breed north of the Himalayan mountain range, but spend their winters at sea level south of the Tibetan Plateau.
They need to fly over the Himalayas in the spring to get back to their breeding grounds, a huge challenge that sees them cross terrain higher than 4,000 metres, where oxygen levels are halved.
Scientists from the University of Exeter used satellite tracking to discover that they fly through valleys in the mountain range - avoiding massive peaks like Mount Everest.
"This is the first evidence of extreme high-altitude flight in a duck," said lead researcher Nicole Parr, of Centre for Ecology and Conservation on the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall.
"This species has probably evolved a range of adaptations to be able to cope with flying so high, where oxygen levels are half those at sea level. We don't yet know the nature of these adaptations.
"Our research also shows that the ruddy shelduck has a faster climb rate than the bar-headed goose - the only waterfowl known to fly even higher."
Dr Lucy Hawkes, the supervisor of the work at the University of Exeter, had previously tracked bar-headed geese to 7,290 metres altitude near Everest in 2014.
They were long thought to be the world's highest-flying bird based on flapping flight (some birds soar higher on thermals), but the new research suggests that the bar-headed geese may not be the only species flying at these high altitudes.



However, more research is needed to find out whether ruddy shelducks reach similar heights to bar-headed geese.

[Image: cheers.jpg]

The scientists used satellite data collected from 15 ruddy shelducks from two populations spending their winter south of the Tibetan Plateau.
They found the birds, which take a "circuitous route" to avoid mountain peaks, regularly fly above 5,000 metres and sometimes go as high as 6,800 metres.
The researchers suggested that ruddy shelducks wintering further east in India may fly even higher, given the higher terrain that lies north of India.
The paper, published in the Journal of Avian Biology, is entitled: "High altitude flights by ruddy shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea) during Trans-Himalayan migrations."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Running geese give insight into low oxygen tolerance
More information: N. Parr et al, High altitude flights by ruddy shelduck Tadorna ferruginea during trans-Himalayan migrations, Journal of Avian Biology (2017). DOI: 10.1111/jav.01443 
Provided by: University of Exeter


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-high-flying-ducks-himalayas.html#jCp[url=https://phys.org/news/2017-09-high-flying-ducks-himalayas.html#jCp][/url]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#90
The skeleton of a Pintail duck was discovered at 16,400 ft on Everest
Mallards hit by aircraft at 21,000 ft over Nev.
http://www.reelfoot.com/migration_121206.htm
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#91
What Swims Like a Duck and Quacks Like a Duck Could Be a Hybrid of Two Duck Species
Trilobites
By JOANNA KLEIN SEPT. 11, 2017

[*][Image: 12TB-DUCK1-master768.jpg]
[*]A new study look at the rate at which mallard ducks, like this one are mating with mottled ducks to create hybrids. Scientists worry hybridization might ultimately eliminate the mottled duck species.CreditSuzanne DeChillo/The New York Times
A duck is a duck, right? Well, yes, but when one duck mates with a duck of another species, there’s the risk that one of the original species could cease to exist. And then that duck is a duck no more.
But who cares? A new, hybrid duck will emerge, and that duck is a duck, right? Maybe over geological time that would be true. But in a natural world affected by human activity, ecologists and conservationists worry that hybridization can upset ecological balances and undermine the survival of species involved in such a blend. Although not a problem yet, a studypublished Thursday in The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests the riddling possibility that two duck species forming a hybrid species could one day leave us with less diversity among North American ducks.
This study is the first to assess the rate at which mallard and Mottled Ducks are combining into hybrids in the western Gulf of Mexico region of the United States. Their results highlight important questions about the interbreeding of species: How much of it is nature doing its own work? How much of it is influenced by humans? And at what point should we be concerned?
You’ve probably met the mallard — green head, frequents city parks, gobbles up your tossed bread, migrates (generally) and likes water of all kinds but isn’t too keen on coastal waters. This duck is perhaps the most common in the world. In winter, you can find it in swamps, marshes and estuaries along the Mississippi Valley.
The Mottled Duck doesn’t migrate. It is primarily coastal, favoring brackish waters along the Gulf Coast from Florida to Texas. But dams and oil and gas pipelines are drying and fragmenting their habitats.

[*]On occasion, the two duck species meet and mate. That shouldn’t seem like a bad thing. But hybridization has nearly wiped out bird species in the recent past. Once the Golden-winged Warbler ranged from the upper Midwest down to the Appalachian Mountains and into eastern South America, depending on the season. But then the Bluewinged Warbler moved into its habitat and nearly bred it out of existence in many areas. Today, the rare bird’s last stronghold is in Minnesota.

Photo

[Image: 12TB-DUCK2-master675.jpg]

A mottled duck in Plantatation, Fla. Almost a tenth of the mottled and mallard ducks in Florida are actually hybrids. CreditKenneth Cole Schneider

Conservationists have wondered if a similar scenario could play itself out with these ducks.

In Florida, feral mallard ducks, released from game farms have quit migrating and begun breeding with native, non-migrating Mottled ducks. There, almost a tenth of the Mottled and mallard ducks are actually hybrids, which is concerning if you wish to preserve the genetic lineage of Mottled Ducks.

To test whether Mottled ducks were at risk of being hybridized too much in other parts of their range, Sabrina Taylor, a geneticist and behavioral ecologist at Louisiana State University and Agricultural Center and her team analyzed DNA from blood samples and carcasses of mallard, Mottled and hybrid ducks in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana. The researchers concluded that the current hybridization rate — between 5 and 8 percent — was low enough not to be a concern.



Part of this recommendation comes down to the different behaviors and habitats of the ducks in Florida versus the western Gulf. What’s a problem in Florida may not be one in the Gulf, where mallards and Mottled Ducks have fewer chances for close encounters of a sexual kind.

The other reason not to worry yet, Dr. Taylor said, is that some hybridization is expected as part of the evolutionary process, although she questions what’s normal and what’s exacerbated by humans, which could create cases where hybridization goes too far.

This is a possibility for the ducks in the Gulf only if more mallards are released, or if Mottled Ducks seek out new homes near mallards as their habitat continues to disappear. Dr. Taylor’s work may provide a baseline for monitoring trends in the future. And for conservation, the conventional rules still apply.

“The best thing anybody can do for species, no matter what the threat is, is try and preserve habitat,” said Dr. Taylor.

So is a duck a duck?
Dr. Taylor said a student of hers put it best: “The whole idea of speciation is like a mountain range. It’s easy to tell the differences between peaks, but saying where one starts and another begins is very difficult.”
[*]https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/scien...trilobites
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#92
Same thing is happening widespread with the Black Duck.
So, the words Autumn and Fall are not to be capitalized?
They are in my world!

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said, "See, this is new?"It has been already, in the ages before us. Ecc 1: 9-10
Reply
#93
They should
[Image: 49e5990c50dc3_24767n.jpg]
formulate a plan
[Image: Mad-scientist-duck.jpeg]
to capture the li'l devils
[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRnudf_kz65NP_P3u-MaBL...C6lDjrXvzu]
and put them in a farady cage
[Image: b0c8198bf248cb1d2c46dbebd153e1ce.jpg]
and transport them back to their natural habitat.
[Image: anas_rubr_AllAm_map.gif]

reset set them with Jet-Lag and they may stray instead of stay and hybridize?

Ninja
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#94
Quote:"I could have had a lot of nice things," the 53-year-old said. "I don't want nice things. I want to see a pink-headed duck."
This time, he is backed by the Global Wildlife Conservation group, which launched a hunt for "lost species "—25 quirky and elusive plants and animals beginning with the duck. A sports optic company and cheesemaking company are also helping pay.
Thorns and three others plan to head to the wetlands north of the vast Indawgyi Lake during the rainy season where they believe they have a better chance of spotting the duck. And Thorn thinks he has a secret weapon: elephants.
He used canoes in the past and thinks he probably spooked the shy birds. Now he plans to bring elephants stomping through the wetlands.  
"Clearly a bird isn't going to hunker down if there are 2-ton elephants," said Thorn.
As crazy as it may seem, Thorns may be onto something, 
youareaducksaid ornithologist Kevin McGowan at Cornell University who isn't part of the expedition.
"Fairly regularly birds get rediscovered," says McGowan, who has gone on unsuccessful expeditions for the ivory-billed woodpecker. "We don't see all the world that is in front of our eyes."


Not so cold duck? Man keeps looking for bird thought extinct
October 23, 2017 by Seth Borenstein

[Image: notsocoldduc.jpg]
This October 2017 photo provided by the Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates shows a specimen of a pink-headed duck in Ithaca, N.Y. Because of the age of the specimen, the head has changed colors. In October 2017, Richard Thorns plans to launch a seventh expedition into the inaccessible wilds of Myanmar to search for the pink-headed duck that hasn't been seen alive since 1949, and that was in India. No one has seen the bird alive in Myanmar in more than a century. (Marilu Lopez Fretts/Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates via AP)
Hope is the thing with feathers, poet Emily Dickinson wrote. For Richard Thorns, the feathers are pink.



Thorns' hope? To prove that a colorful duck is not extinct. This week, he launches a seventh expedition into the inaccessible wilds of Myanmar to search for the pink-headed duck that hasn't been seen alive since 1949, and that was in India. No one has seen the bird alive in Myanmar in more than a century.
Thorns, a British writer who quit his shop clerk job 20 years ago after reading about the pink-headed duck in the book "Vanishing Birds," has spent $20,000 of his own money on previous fruitless trips. His birder brother called him mad.
"I could have had a lot of nice things," the 53-year-old said. "I don't want nice things. I want to see a pink-headed duck."
This time, he is backed by the Global Wildlife Conservation group, which launched a hunt for "lost species "—25 quirky and elusive plants and animals beginning with the duck. A sports optic company and cheesemaking company are also helping pay.
Thorns and three others plan to head to the wetlands north of the vast Indawgyi Lake during the rainy season where they believe they have a better chance of spotting the duck. And Thorn thinks he has a secret weapon: elephants.
He used canoes in the past and thinks he probably spooked the shy birds. Now he plans to bring elephants stomping through the wetlands.
"Clearly a bird isn't going to hunker down if there are 2-ton elephants," said Thorn.
As crazy as it may seem, Thorns may be onto something, said ornithologist Kevin McGowan at Cornell University who isn't part of the expedition.
"Fairly regularly birds get rediscovered," says McGowan, who has gone on unsuccessful expeditions for the ivory-billed woodpecker. "We don't see all the world that is in front of our eyes."
A Cornell student found Bermuda petrels, rare seabirds thought to be extinct for 300 years. Other rediscovered animals include a crow species in Asia and a nocturnal parrot in Australia. These birds survive by not being noticed "so what's your certainty that it's gone?" said McGowan.
One thing that keeps Thorns going is the thought that someone else might find the pink-headed duck first.
Every time he goes out, the bird "breaks my heart," he said. "Sometimes I wish I hadn't seen that picture."
___
Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter at @borenbears . His work can be found here.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Extinct pink-headed duck derived its unique color from carotenoids


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-cold-duck-bird-thought-extinct.html#jCp[url=https://phys.org/news/2017-10-cold-duck-bird-thought-extinct.html#jCp][/url]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#95
Rare Mandarin Duck Makes A Splash In Central Park

October 31, 2018 at 4:44 pm
Filed Under:Central ParkJohn DiasLocal TVManhattanNew York



NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – A rare duck is going viral online after finding a new home in New York City.
[Image: dsc01252-mandarin-duck-close-up.jpg?w=420&h=245](credit: Pat Dubren)
The Mandarin duck, known for its multicolored feathers and hot pink bill, is native to East Asia. The big question: Why is it here, in the middle of Manhattan?

ADVERTISING

[size=undefined]
[img=0x0]https://cbsnewyork.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/duck2.jpg?w=420&h=420[/img]A Mandarin Duck at Central Park New York City
(credit: Dennis Newsham @TouristPicsNYC)

Photographer Dennis Newsham can’t get enough of the duck.
“I took a couple hundred [pictures] because it’s a rare bird and I was trying to get some action shots, and I got some of it flying,” Newsham said.
[img=0x0]https://cbsnewyork.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/duck1.jpg?w=420&h=420[/img]A Mandarin Duck and Wood Duck at Central Park New York City
(credit: Dennis Newsham @TouristPicsNYC)

The Harlem man isn’t the only one flocking to the park to get a glimpse.
The bird was first spotted on Oct. 10th and videotaped in a now viral video.
Since then, New Yorkers and tourists are swarming to the pond in the southeast corner of the park near 59th and Fifth.
[Image: dsc01232-mandarin-duck-preening.jpg?w=420&h=315](credit: Pat Dubren)
“It’s just an incredible gift to New York,” said bird watcher Yovanna Davinci.
“This is a wonderful opportunity to see a beautiful animal,” said Michelle Ashkin, co-director of education at the Wild Bird Fund.
The reason why the bird is causing such a buzz? It’s native to East Asia. It shouldn’t be in the middle of Manhattan.
[Image: dsc01270-mandarin-duck-wood-duck.jpg?w=420&h=210](credit: Pat Dubren)
“It’s just enjoying some sunlight and taking it easy,” said bird watcher Dave Barrett.
Barrett says it’s one of the most colorful ducks you can find.
“It’s beautiful. That’s the thing that is getting people’s imaginations fired… It’s the most beautiful duck, probably in the world,” Barrett said.
Barrett says he’s checked with every zoo in the city, and none are missing a duck. It leads the bird watching community to believe it was a domestic pet, which is illegal in New York City.
[Image: dsc00935-mandarin-duck-at-pond.jpg?w=420&h=280](credit: Pat Dubren)
“It might have got away or someone might have got tired of it and dumped it,” Barrett said.
It also may have flown here from a neighboring town.
Whatever the reason, it’s here. And it’s no chicken. This duck isn’t afraid to take on New York.
Bird experts say they don’t think the duck will migrate for the winter, but it should survive here in New York.
The city doesn’t plan on removing the duck unless it appears to be unhealthy or in danger.
Right now, neither seem to be the case.[/size]


https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2018/10/31/...tral-park/
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)