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The great Cyprus bank robbery
#1
This is happening as we speak. The shock has hit all Europe. For days, Cypriot banks, electronic transfer and cash machines have been shut down and mass protest has begun. tomorrow, private accounts will start to be plundered. Scary thing is, Cyprus is basically a money laundering front for the Russian mafia, and unless they were tipped off in advance and pulled funds, I guess they wont be too pleased.

http://www.businessinsider.com/cyprus-ba...uns-2013-3

Quote:This Crazy Cyprus Deal Could Screw Up A Lot More Than Cyprus...

You can be forgiven for thinking that you don't need to give a hoot about what's going on in Cyprus this weekend.

After all, it's just a little island somewhere in the Mediterranean.

But what's going on in Cyprus could actually matter — not just to the rest of Europe, but to the rest of the world.

Here's the short version of what's happening:

Cyprus's banks, like many banks in Europe, are bankrupt.

Cyprus went to the Eurozone to get a bailout, the same way Ireland, Greece, and other European countries have.

The Eurozone powers-that-be gave Cyprus a bailout — but with a startling condition that has never before been imposed on any major banking system since the start of the global financial crisis in 2008.

The Eurozone powers-that-be (mainly, Germany) insisted that the depositors in Cyprus's banks pay part of the tab.

Not the bondholders.

When Cyprus's banks reopen on Tuesday morning, every depositor will have some of his or her money seized. Accounts under 100,000 euros will have 6.75% of the funds seized. Accounts over 100,000 euros will have 9.9% seized. And then the Eurozone's emergency lending facility and the International Monetary Fund will inject 10 billion euros into the banks to allow them to keep operating.

Cyprus's government tried to explain this deal by observing that it was better than the alternative: Immediate bankruptcy and closure of the major banks. In that scenario, depositors would lose a lot more of their money. Businesses would go bankrupt. And tens of thousands of people would be instantly thrown out of work.

But, still, not surprisingly, news that deposits in Cyprus's banks would be seized triggered an immediate run on the banks.

Depositors rushed to ATMs and tried to withdraw their money before it could be seized.

But the ATMs weren't working. And the government has now made it impossible to transfer money out of the country.

So, assuming Cyprus's government approves the deal (still pending), depositors will have some of their money seized on Tuesday morning.

Now, half of these depositors are said to be Russian oligarchs and other non-residents. And unless you happen to have the misfortune of having an account in a Cyprus bank, you may not care much whether these depositors have their money seized.

After all, that was the risk they took for storing their money in bankrupt banks, right?

Well, yes, that was the risk they took.

But ever since the Great Depression wiped out a big percentage of the world's banks, vaporizing the bank depositors' savings in the process, banking system regulators have tried to do everything they can to protect bank depositors.

And they are smart to do so.

Because the moment depositors think that there is risk to their savings, they rush to banks to yank their money out.

That's called a run on the bank.

And since no bank anywhere has enough cash on hand to pay off all its depositors at once, runs on the bank cause banks to go bust.

That's what happened to hundreds of banks in the Great Depression.

And it's what happened to Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, and other huge banks during the financial crisis (though, with Bear and Lehman, the folks who yanked their money out weren't mom and pop depositors but other big financial institutions). It's what threatened to bring the entire U.S. financial system to its knees. And it's why the U.S. and European governments have been frantically bailing out banks ever since.

But now, thanks to Eurozone's bizarre decision in Cyprus, the illusion that depositors don't need to yank their money out of threatened banks because they'll be protected has been shattered.

Depositors in Cyprus banks will lose some of their deposits.

They will be furious about this.

And they will, rightly, feel that it is grossly unfair — because depositors in the bailed-out banks in Ireland, Greece, etc. didn't lose their money.

And they will feel like fools for not having taken their money out.

And ... here's the important part ...

Other depositors at weak banks all over Europe, in places like Spain, Italy, and Greece, will rightly wonder whether this is the beginning of a new era of bank bailouts, an era in which bank depositors are going lose some of their money.

What do you think those other depositors in Spain, Italy, Greece, etc., are going to feel like doing when they realize that, if their banks ever need a bailout, they might have their deposits seized?

That's right.

They're going to feel like yanking their money out of their banks.

And if some of them yank their money out of their banks, well — then the financial condition of those banks will go from weak to insolvent.

And the banks will go rushing to their governments and the Eurozone for help.

And if, god forbid, the Eurozone decides to seize the deposits of more bank depositors ...

Well, then, a good portion of Europe is going to suddenly experience a good old-fashioned bank run.

That, to put it mildly, could be a disaster.

It could bring the European financial crisis, which has lurched from one flare-up to another for most of the past five years, to a rather sudden head.

How much would it cost for the powers-that-be to bail out all of Europe's weak banks at once?

A lot.

More than the Eurozone has in its emergency lending facilities, certainly. And more than the International Monetary Fund has on hand.

So the U.S. would probably have to get involved.

And, regardless of whether the U.S. needed to get involved, the European economy would likely suffer the equivalent of a heart attack.

That wouldn't be good for the U.S. economy.

Or the Chinese economy.

Or any other economy that sells things to Europe.

So, you can see, this little decision to seize a little money from bank depositors in the little island of Cyprus could be a much bigger deal than you think.

It could conceivably precipitate a run on weak European banks.

And a run on weak European banks could hammer the European economy and then the economy of Europe's trading partners. And it could cause global markets to crash.

So keep an eye on what's going on over there in Cyprus.

It's potentially much more important than it seems.

Given the above, this is either a very, very stupid thing for the banks to do, or there is more than first meets the eye. A trigger move to a global crash perhaps?

Damned
“Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” <br />Sir John Harrington
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#2
A lot of Russian money in those banks.
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#3
http://dailybail.com/home/schiff-banks-a...vency.html
Quote:Great clip.  Schiff battles CNBC bank bailout drones.

Peter Schiff on Closing Bell this afternoon.  Start watching right at 1:00.  Other guests are Jason Pride of Glenmede, and Hank Smith of Haverford Investments.

One of the buy-side tools exclaims:


I think everyone agrees TARP saved the banking system.

Schiff responds:


The banks are in the worst shape they've even been.  They are a just a few interest rate hikes from insolvency.

Maria Buffoonromo and a few other idiots talking book.  Schiff goes off, and Maria, ever the financial media protector of JPMorgan et al., gets killed.  It's more of the same, but the true colors come out for a few minutes. (Hat tip to Josie)
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#4
http://www.prisonplanet.com/banking-chie...vings.html
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#5
http://www.spiegel.de/international/euro...89594.html
German Economist: 'Europe's Citizens Now Have to Fear for Their Money'
Quote:For the first time, bank customers in a crisis-plagued euro-zone country are being forced to contribute to its bailout. In an interview, German economist Peter Bofinger warns the strategy is "extremely dangerous" and could lead to a run on banks.



SPIEGEL ONLINE: Mr. Bofinger, Cyprus will be saved -- and every Cypriot bank customer will have to pay up. Whether that person is Greek or Russian, whether they have €1,000 or €10 million in their account, part of that person's savings will be taken. Is this a good strategy?







ANZEIGE



Bofinger: It is the worst possible. Making small-scale savers pay is extremely dangerous. It will shake the trust of depositors across the Continent. Europe's citizens now have to fear for their money.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Do you expect that despositors in Spain, Italy, Portugal and other crisis-plagued countries will make a run on their accounts because they, too, might have to pay someday?

Bofinger: Yes. These fears will now be stoked. The Spaniards, Italians and Portuguese may not run to the banks today or tomorrow, but as soon as the crisis intensifies in a euro-zone country, the bank customers will remember Cyprus. They will withdraw their money and, by doing so, intensify the crisis.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: The Cypriot government wants to minimize this panic effect. The Wall Street Journal reported today that the latest proposal in Nicosia would include only a 3-percent one-time levy for small-scale depositors rather than the 6.75 percent tax included in the deal reached in Brussels over the weekend.

Bofinger: That wouldn't change anything. If you live in a home, then you expect 100 percent safety. If someone says to you, "Three percent of your roof could cave in," then you still wouldn't want to live there anymore.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: The euro-zone partner countries seeking to provide Cyprus with a bailout view the participation of small-scale depositors as a necessary evil. This is because any aid provided by the long-term euro rescue fund, the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), would be added on top of Cyprus's national debt. Without the contributions of bank customers, the government's debt level would be unsustainable.

Bofinger: Shaking the confidence of depositors across Europe cannot be the solution. Those seeking to save the euro should be contributing true aid during an emergency.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: You mean they should give free money to Cyprus?

Bofinger: At the end of the day, it would be better to take charge and provide a billion euros to rescue the small-scale savers in Cyprus than to risk a collapse of the euro financial system.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: But that would also mean entering into a transfer union and breaking another taboo that is at least as big. Greece, Portugal, Spain and co. would want their money for free in the future, too.

Bofinger: That can be easily avoided. Cyprus is a special case, and it can be communicated as such. No other euro-zone country in Southern Europe has such a bloated financial sector. And there is no other country that could have a comparable domino effect in the euro crisis. Cypriot banks lent some €22 billion to Greek firms and private households, and they have suffered very high losses as a result of the restructuring of Greek bonds.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Nevertheless, it would be almost impossible to justify giving money away to a crisis country for free. How is Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble supposed to explain to parliament that he is giving away German taxpayers' money to a government that is accused of having insufficient controls against money laundering?

Bofinger: Such political failings should be dealt with as quickly as possible. But the main issue here is not Cyprus. It's how we guarantee the euro's stability. That's also in Germany's interest.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: In what sense?

Bofinger: After the election in Italy, the situation within the currency union is once again very unstable. An end of the common currency would be the equivalent of a nuclear meltdown for German industry. The question is this: How can the euro be stabilized as cost-efficiently as possible? If depositors across Europe make a run on their accounts, the rescue will get a lot more expensive than it would if money were raised to save the small-scale depositors in Cyprus.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: The participation of Cypriot bank customers also serves another purpose. The financial institutions are holding a lot of money from wealthy Russians in their accounts. Some believe those accounts contain illicit funds from money laundering. The partial expropriation of depositors is supposed to counter the accusation that the ESM has become a bailout package for Russians.




Bofinger: There are better solutions for that, too. Depositors with up to €100,000 should be able to keep all their money. But richer depositors should be made to pay more. For example, starting at €1 million, 20 percent of an account's savings could be seized. At €10 million, that figure could be 30 percent. One could also review whether it would be legal to tax depositors from non-EU countries in Europe at a greater rate.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: So you're calling for a bigger compulsory levy for Russians than for Europeans?

Bofinger: Why not?

Interview conducted by Stefan Schultz
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#6
http://12160.info/forum/topics/russia-wo...ness-photo
Quote:Russia World Society Science Incidents Opinion Business Photo Advertising sections News » Russia Russia to revise its relations with Cyprus - Medvedev
Posted by mystery on March 18, 2013 at 10:10pm in Current News/Events
View Discussions

Russia will adjust its relations with Cyprus in the event the island nation taxes bank deposits, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said at the meeting of the Supervisory Board of Vnesheconombank, which was held in connection with a possible debit of up to ten percent of the funds from the bank accounts of the country.

Medvedev said that he did not know who the author of the idea was. "This practice, unfortunately, was very well known and is familiar to many Russians from the Soviet period, when money was exchanged with coefficients and never returned. - said the prime minister. - But Cyprus is a country with market economy, a member of the European Union," Medvedev said. As the prime minister said, the move "looks just like confiscation of people' money."

Russian President Vladmir Putin said that the decision on collection was unfair, unprofessional and dangerous. The head of the Russian Ministry of Finance, Mr. Siluanov made it clear that the one-off tax could abolish the debt restructuring of Cyprus to Moscow.

Earlier, the Cypriot authorities stated at the request of the EU that they were going to debit up to 6.75 percent from deposits under 100,000 euros, and from larger deposits - 9.9 percent in profit of state.

Gathered from:  http://english.pravda.ru/news/russia/18-...prus_russi...
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#7
http://mycatbirdseat.com/2013/03/putin-h...osit-levy/
Quote:Putin hits out at “dangerous” Cyprus bank deposit levy
My Catbird SeatMarch 19, 20130

Editor's note : The European Union (EU) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) agreed to bail out Cyprus by granting the island nation in the Mediterranean a EUR 10 billion (USD 13 billion) loan. In return, the government of Cyprus had to agree to levy a minimum 6,75 % one-off tax on all deposits at Cypriot banks.



According to several Russian news agencies and media, Russian banks had approximately USD 12 billion deposited in banks on Cyprus while Russian corporations have another USD 19 billion invested in Cypriot banks.



This means that the EU and the IMF will get USD $3 Billion from Russian banks and corporations immediately for a USD 13 billion loan to Cyprus.



President Vladimir Putin called the imposing a one-off levy on all bank deposits as part of the bailout deal, including the deposits of foreign investors, “unfair, unprofessional and dangerous” and said that it was setting a dangerous precedent.



Using the figures given, Russian banks and Russian corporations apparently have USD $31 Billion in Cypriot banks.  $31 Billion X .0675 = USD $2.0925 Billion. In total, Russian banks, corporations and Russian citizens are thought to have just under half of the USD $91 Billion in Cypriot banks, so in addition to the hit Russian banks and corporations would take, Russian citizens could be hit for ~$11 billion X .0675 = USD $742.5 Million which could put the total at approximately USD $2.835 Billion that Russian banks, corporations and citizens will have to pay to the IMF and the EU so that Cyprus can get this USD 13 billion loan.

The Zionists who control the IMF and the ECB ripping the Russian banks and corporations off for USD $2.0925 Billion ?

________________



Russia has made no decision yet on whether to extend the duration or ease the terms of a sovereign loan to Cyprus, a government source told Reuters earlier on Monday.



By Lidia Kelly and Alexei Anishchuk

Reuters



MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russian President Vladimir Putin criticized on Monday a levy imposed by the European Union on bank deposits in Cyprus as unfair and setting a dangerous precedent.

"While assessing the proposed additional levy on bank accounts in Cyprus, Putin said that such a decision, should it be made, would be unfair, unprofessional and dangerous," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told journalists.

Russian citizens account for the majority of the billions of euros held in Cypriot banks by foreign depositors, and Russian banks are heavily exposed to the island as a favored offshore centre for big business.

The levy, imposed as part of a 10 billion euro bailout, sparked panic among Cypriots over the weekend and hit Russian and other European financial markets on Monday.

As the Cyprus parliament prepares to vote on the measure on Monday, the government in Nicosia was working on a plan to soften the blow for smaller savers.

Russian Deputy Finance Minister Sergei Shatalov earlier said the tax would be acceptable if it was levied only on interest earned by savers.

There are almost 70 billion euros in deposits held in Cyprus. A little less than half that is held by non-residents, most believed to be Russian.

At the end of last year, Russian banks had around $12 billion on deposits with Cypriot banks and corporate deposits accounted for another $19 billion, according to Moody's credit-rating agency.

That figure is more than twice the size of the bailout, which had been repeatedly delayed amid concerns from other EU states that the close business and banking ties with Russia made Cyprus a conduit for money-laundering.

It ranks as the largest source of foreign direct investment into Russia – money that is largely Russian in origin.

NO DECISION ON RUSSIAN LOAN

Russia has made no decision yet on whether to extend the duration or ease the terms of a sovereign loan to Cyprus, a government source told Reuters earlier on Monday.

European Union officials have said they expect Russia to extend the 2.5 billion euro ($3.27 billion) loan by five years, until 2021, and refinance terms.

Cyprus' Finance Minister Michael Sarris had planned to travel to Moscow on Monday for meetings to try to pin down new loan terms. A second Russian government source said Sarris would now travel on Wednesday.

The levy on savers, meanwhile, should not alter domestic capital flows, the news agency Prime quoted Deputy Economy Minister Andrei Klepach as saying.

Officials have also said Russian investors are interested in buying a majority stake in Cyprus Popular Bank and increasing their holdings in Bank of Cyprus – the two biggest banks on the Mediterranean island.

The involvement of any Russian investors – private or state – in recapitalization of the island's struggling banks is still a matter for discussion, the first government source said.

"There has been no decision yet," the source said.

($1 = 0.7654 euros)

(Moscow Newsroom; Editing by John Stonestreet)
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#8
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/new...llion.html
FURY erupted yesterday as it emerged that rich Russians withdrew £2billion BEFORE a tax raid on bank savings in Cyprus was announced.
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#9
Italy next at 15% rate? Then New Zealand? (read to bottom of article)

http://www.activistpost.com/2013/03/eu-r...ts-to.html
“Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” <br />Sir John Harrington
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#10
http://www.prisonplanet.com/banking-chie...vings.html

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122460155879054331.html
Argentina Makes Grab for Pensions Amid Crisis
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#11
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/201...-americans
Quote:March 19, 2013 5:07 PM
Group: Banks closing accounts of Arab-Americans
By Associated Press

An Arab-American advocacy group has asked the federal government to investigate banks for closing accounts of community members.

The Arab-American Civil Rights League in Dearborn said Tuesday that it sent a letter to the U.S. Justice Department after learning about a half-dozen closures in the past month.

Executive Director Rana Abbas said the customers are from the area’s large Arab community and most are professionals. She said several banks haven’t explained why they closed the accounts.

The Michigan Bankers Association said it lacks specific information about the complaints on which to comment.

The league says the banks’ silence could be related to the issue of secret national security letters. The FBI sends thousands annually to banks and other businesses demanding customer information.

A federal judge last week declared the letters unconstitutional.
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#12
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/...41335.html
Quote:Inside parliament, the opposition party leader echoed the sentiment of the crowds. “Why should we accept our entry into a vicious circle of uncertainty which will lead to worse measures? Why accept a measure that has never been accepted anywhere else?” asked Communist leader Andros Kyprianou.

He also demanded a list of all the names of depositors who had withdrawn their savings from bank accounts in the run-up to the controversial Eurogroup summit that decided on the stringent deal. Rumours had been spreading on the island that a number of politicians and foreign dignitaries had removed their assets from financial institutions in recent weeks.

Earlier in the day, the Cypriot Finance Minister was landing in Moscow to explore alternative options with the island’s long-time Russian allies. Many Cypriots fear losing their close links with the Russian expat community should an eventual bailout deal come down hard on those with the largest bank balances on the island. An increasing number of Russians are now resident in Cyprus and their activities provide work to many: from large companies to small shops. Imposing mansions and fancy designer shops in the capital are evidence of this recent financial boom.

One of the island’s most important law firms deals largely with Russians. Vassiliades & Co said its clients had almost all said they will move their deposits as soon as financial institutions in Cyprus open again.

“We have the exact same amount of Russian interests in Cyprus as in the South of France, but the EU doesn’t seem to be that preoccupied by that,” said Chris Vassiliades. He added that most of his Russian clients are thinking of transferring their funds to France. “We are trying to appease them as at the moment nobody really knows what will happen.”

“If Russians leave Cyprus, the island will be destroyed,” said 40-year-old George.

Elias, a Cypriot who owns a mini market in the heart of Nicosia, sells products that range from Vodka to jams and sausages to the Russian community. “If they leave, I might as well close my shop. What’s the point of buying this stuff if I can’t sell it, other than outright catastrophe?”
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#13
Yay, the board is back! it was down till before i left for holiday.

The banks are closed, they may not reopen, this is amazing.

If they don't rob the people's accounts they have to come up with the money out of thin air.

Everyone says "the bond holder's should suffer not the account holders", morally i agree but there is a catch:

The bond holders are the other nations banks who are also barely above being totally bankrupt.

If Cyprus stands their ground and the Russians don't bail them out then the Euro is toast here and now. In the long run it is toast period.
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards...
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#14
Hi
http://www.wnd.com/2013/03/analyst-russi...4qSDFPq.99
Quote:Recent events have underscored the prospect due to the firing of Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov, who served under then-President Dmitry Medvedev, who now is the Russian prime minister.

Russian President Vladimir Putin replaced Serdyukov with Sergei Shoigu, who is more in line with Putin’s outlook on the future role and capabilities of the military.

Under Medvedev, Serdyukov had a different approach, which was to more closely work with the West in an effort to obtain Western technologies and know-how to modernize not only Russian infrastructure but also the military.

All of that went away with Putin’s more confrontational approach with the U.S. and his efforts to blunt American nfluence in Central Asia, which Moscow claims is in its sphere of influence.

Putin also aims to recreate a post-Soviet empire by incorporating the former Soviet republics into a Eurasian Union, a duty-free zone that he sees rivaling the European Union in years to come.

According to Arbatov, Russia’s defense and foreign policies now reflect that Russia is surrounded by enemies led by the U.S. Moscow is concerned that the U.S. and its NATO allies will invade Russia at any time.

Arbatov said the U.S. is using the pro-democracy opposition inside Russia to subvert Putin’s regime and intends to use that opposition to invade Russia.

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#15
Quote:Blood In The Streets

By Jim Kirwan
3-20-13



 

The global-clock of deadlines is coming tomorrow. Even at this late hour the world is still taking serious notice of real options that have previously not even been considered. Banks & Governments have become the hugely-bloated pigs that sit at the center of every financial and legal problem facing virtually every country in the world right-now.

“A bank is first of all a bank, and nothing more. Greed has led many countries to allow banks to enter into every conceivable scam, to illegally “profit” from institutions that are essentially criminal in nature. All that the world has to do is follow the international-example set by Iceland and we can all begin to free-ourselves of everything that is financially-threatening every man woman and child on the earth.” (1)

What is finally being ‘looked-at’ are the essential-governmental-structures in every country. Most have too many banks and too much government. This diet of monetary junk-food created overweight-criminal-organizations along with private-corporatized-interests, which are supported by mercenary-armies. This insures that the world will supposedly stay on the wrong-course which will take us all back to the time before the wheel was even invented.

“(Reuters) - A small island on the edge of Europe teetering under the weight of its bust banks. Sound familiar?

Like Iceland and Ireland before it, Cyprus is battling to prevent an outsized and overextended banking sector from dragging the country into the ground.

Cyprus's parliament has overwhelmingly rejected a proposed levy on deposits as a condition of a European bailout, throwing the country's future into disarray.

But the experiences of Iceland and Ireland show that however Cyprus decides to deal with its crisis, pain is in store.

While Reykjavik let banks fail and introduced capital controls, making financing its economy difficult, Dublin nationalized most of its financial sector, helping to quadruple its debt burden and ensuring years of austerity.

Both countries are growing again, but underlying problems remain with households in both nations still swamped in housing debt, Irish unemployment stuck at 14 percent and Iceland fearful of lifting its capital controls for fear of a damaging outflow of foreign funds.”… (2)

Iceland set the course and tone for the only ‘track’ available to end the international-bloodshed that’s about to begin. The world has been altered by outlaws from individually-designed polices to satisfy foreign-needs. The result has been pre-packaged slave states that are run on separate tracks that cannot be deviated from.

Ireland has begun to make some progress. But every major nation must take this course seriously. If formerly viable nation-states are to survive, unlike the already nation-state-free EU: We must directly destroy what’s already been built and what “THEY-SAY” is the only option. To end global-slavery we must get off “their track”. Think about it for a moment…!

The cost of doing business has massive pre-costs attached. The heaviest costs for any start-up are in the front-end. For example: Farmers need to clear the land, buy seeds and plant. At every step there are expenses. Once the crops have been harvested, initial profits will off-set the costs and lead directly to larger-profits in the future. In that process duplication and excess must be eliminated in order to maximize available funds. To make success possible in this world our lands must first be freed from the weeds of corruption!

There are duplications. Continued global-mafia criminalization and collusion do produce changes: Nothing from that change is positive! ‘Success for countries’ was never the point. The supposed ‘powers’ only pay lip-service to their promises. There is never any real profit produced by any government policy. Government polices allow profits to be stolen from us, which are then sent straight back to the banksters; while all our needs get dumped. None of the original needs or loans are met! Farmers or investors are forced to pursue new loans, again. Meanwhile the outlaws keep the profits: The public is forced to pay all costs, plus interest and penalties. And that is where we are!

The overblown-banks & the feral governments are feeding their outsized-greed and global-addictions to control every human field of endeavor. This is called Full Spectrum Dominance.

Criminally-designed-theft contains an added bonus, for the traitors, trapping the citizens of the world under colossal mountains of debt. This debt is so huge that it exceeds the combined-totals of all the current-deposits in the world. Debt-of-that-size must be written-off!

The world is facing a choice between real PASSION and the killer-form of DENIAL that can only embrace SURRENDER.

There is no question that anything as catastrophic as $1.2 to $2 Quadrillion dollars of DEBT could ever be dealt with: Except by canceling it.

The N.W.O. insists that every cent of this fraudulent money be repaid. Yet banks are the only part of every society that must be protected, according to them—while everyone else must go straight to hell!

Choices: The depth of choice has been out there long enough to demand the chance to be reviewed. This should begin by emulating what Iceland did and continues to do.

“There is another choice and Iceland decided to pursue it. Back in 2008 they also had an epic collapse and in fact their banks defaulted on $85 billion dollars: And especially for a country the size of Iceland that is gigantic… Their debt to income ration, back in 2008 was an unbelievable 240%. So the size of their problem was even larger than our problem when you look at it per-capita and proportionally. Huge problem. Well then obviously you need to make sure that the banks are afloat—right? Otherwise they can’t take the action that they need to take. Here’s what the people of Iceland decided instead—

Ah NO, We’re coming for you.

And not only did they have protests, when they were starting to throw rocks at the Parliament Building, and saying “We’re not going to take this crap.”

Instead this is the route that they went. They indicted their former prime-minister, in September of 2009, for his role in the crisis. And then they decided that’s not enough so let’s go let’s go ahead and arrest the former chief-executives of the three biggest banks. …Over two hundred criminal charges for the bankers. Now wait: We were told here in the United States that


“You can’t do that! ­ these are the BANKERS! ­ you’ll destroy the economy!”


In fact not only did they do that but a former CEO of one of their top banks …got stints in solitary confinement. They “Bradley-Manninged him” We Bradley Manning people that are trying to expose what the government is doing wrong: They do it for people who actually destroy their economy—who is more logical?” More at the link below (3).


What the USA must-do is go after the retired people from Goldman-Sachs, the Federal Reserve and the top six banks in this country. We need to begin with Henry Kissinger; all ex-presidents beginning with George H.W. Bush, all the way through to Bush junior.

Barry Soweto presents additional problems. Seizing his predecessors will go a long way toward solving this. This corrective action, by itself, will create the metaphorical “Blood in the Streets”. More importantly, this will set this nation on exactly the opposite track from this ‘Down-Bound-Train that is taking ‘us’ into total Oblivion - which is just days away if we don’t act now!

In reality the Criminal U.S. Congress & US Court system will balk at any attempt to alter US policy when it comes to the banks or the government: The time for tolerating these Traitors is long-gone. This is put-up or shut-up time for any who have not yet grown ‘a pair’!

Either the American people follow the example set by Iceland and chose FREEDOM and financial-recovery - or this place will crumble to the global-cabal that wants nothing more than to include the USA in the EU-GLOBAL-SURRENDER; together with all other nations, to their damnable polices of one-world-government.

The United States needs to adopt Iceland’s clear response:

HELL NO TO SURRENDER!

We Must Go After the Bankers & the Politicians!




kirwanstudios@sbcglobal.net

1) Reversing Structures ­ Ending Global Banks

http://rense.com/general95/revers.html




2) Cypriot banks on brink in Icelandic flashback

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/2...0K20130320




3) Ron Paul: Iceland Dismantles Corrupt Gov't Then Arrests All Rothschild Bankers ­ 6min 26 sec VIDEO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pla...t4Z3rm4r-4
http://rense.com/general95/blood.html
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#16
and as a added bouns
Dance2
Germany wants Their Gold.
http://12160.info/video/germany-wants-it...e=activity
Larry Lindsey and the Squawk Box team discuss why Germany is moving some of its gold out of storage at the New York Federal Reserve. Fair Use Disclaimer: Thi...
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#17
http://sherriequestioningall.blogspot.co...-port.html

Cyprus Article: Russians want Naval Port, German Navy could be out with 3 months notice.
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#18
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...es-EU.html
Quote:Cyprus says No to bank raid and turns to Russia: Two in three islanders now want to leave the eurozone
Islanders want to turn for Russia for help as economic crisis deepens
Russia has vast cash reserves in Cypriot banks
Distrust in Germany grows over cash confiscation fears



By James Chapman

PUBLISHED:04:37 EST, 21 March 2013| UPDATED: 20:58 EST, 21 March 2013

Cyprus was on the brink of going bust last night as its teetering government faced a growing clamour to ditch the euro.

As horrified islanders faced new limits on cashpoint withdrawals and a ban on taking money out of the country, a poll showed more than two-thirds now want to leave the single currency and turn to Russia for help.


Last night, as one bank was said to have just a ‘few hours’ left before it runs out of cash, politicians were scrambling to cobble together a ‘Plan B’ to avoid a bankruptcy that would send shockwaves through the European banking system.

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
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#19
US banks you are next!!! This sequester is the excuse the government needs to do the same here.
Seek and ye shall find. JESUS
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I am a recovering vegetarian   Hi
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#20
http://xrepublic.tv/node/2682
"NO BANK ACCOUNT ANYWHERE IN THE EUROZONE IS SAFE"
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#21
It wouldn't surprise me if somebody challenged this in the European Court of Human Rights, although they could be waiting a long time for a verdict.
UK left the Euro system and this will not increase the popularity of rejoining. Could also deter other countries from joining it: this short term answer is not going to improve the Euro's long term prospects.
It's killed Cyprus's long term prospects - no more Russians, a lot less jobs and the only other moneyspinner is British tourists, most of them young and only there for cheap booze who will probably try Spain this year.
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#22
Let's keep our eyes open for a wave of strange deaths among the politicians who just took all that money from the Russians.  I saw an interview with a pissed off Russian billionaire and my impression was he is exactly what my stereotype was of a Russian Mafia King.  Yikes.  He was mad and looked like he wanted to hurt someone, and that he was going to hurt someone.  If I was a Cypriot politician's bodyguard, I'd be looking for new work
&quot;Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.&quot; --Aldous Huxley
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#23
seems like lately
many are going out of their way to piss off "Ivan"/ Russia
on many fronts
Whistle
Not good for a lot of Banker's futures
Ninja
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#24
(03-26-2013, 11:19 PM)ArniK link Wrote:Let's keep our eyes open for a wave of strange deaths among the politicians who just took all that money from the Russians.  I saw an interview with a pissed off Russian billionaire and my impression was he is exactly what my stereotype was of a Russian Mafia King.  Yikes.  He was mad and looked like he wanted to hurt someone, and that he was going to hurt someone.  If I was a Cypriot politician's bodyguard, I'd be looking for new work
Well not that only. Alot of hackers come out of that region. Major spam bot networks are operated from Russia. I think instead of physical hits, they would do electronic hits and drain a few bank accounts or something.
Quote:No mountain is too tall if your first step is belief. -Anonymous
...Because even if there were no artifacts anywhere, not studying things of interest is an extreme disservice to science. -Tarius
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#25
It's the precedent that is scary.  I don't feel too bad about some Russian billionaires losing money, but my mom lives off the interest in her nest egg and it would have been hit if that stuff came over here.  So they take from the little old lady to rescue JP Morgan Chase?  Screw that.
&quot;Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.&quot; --Aldous Huxley
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#26
(03-27-2013, 11:40 PM)ArniK link Wrote:It's the precedent that is scary.  I don't feel too bad about some Russian billionaires losing money, but my mom lives off the interest in her nest egg and it would have been hit if that stuff came over here.  So they take from the little old lady to rescue JP Morgan Chase?  Screw that.

Worship

Amen, screw that.

Truth is the Russian Oligarchs got their money out through foreign branches which remained open.

It was the little old ladies they were targeting all along, they can take 100% of the rich people's money but it won't help because there are not many of them.

They need to fleece the masses, roll back the industrial revolution, just as they have the Magna Carta and a thousand years of civil rights progress.
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards...
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#27
http://investmentwatchblog.com/new-brics...-bank-imf/

New BRICS bank to rival World Bank, IMF… China and Brazil Ditch US Dollar

Quote:The BRICS group of emerging economies has unveiled a new development bank, which is aimed at breaking the monopoly held by Western-backed institutions.

“It’s done,” said Pravin Gordhan, South African Finance Minister, on Tuesday, adding that “we made very good progress” on the formation of a World Bank-analogue development agency.

Finance ministers of the BRICS countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – met in Durban, South Africa for the opening of the fifth BRICS summit this week as leaders are expected to make an official announcement on Wednesday.

“Not long ago we discussed the formation of a developmental bank…Today we are ready to launch it,” said South African President Jacob Zuma on Monday.
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#28
http://www.foxbusiness.com/industries/20...tax-study/
Quote:The top House Republican on energy policy criticized a new proposal from the International Monetary Fund to raise gasoline taxes to help reduce carbon emissions and fix other problems like budget deficits--and even traffic congestion and accidents.

In a new study on global energy and climate change Wednesday, the IMF suggested the U.S. consider $1.40 a gallon in higher gas taxes. If adopted, the increase would triple gas taxes in the U.S. – local, state and federal combined -- and send the price of gas higher than $5 a gallon.
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#29
Banks opened again.
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#30
http://12160.info/page/cyprus-president-...-to-london-
Quote:Cyprus President's Family Transferred Tens Of Millions To London Days Before Deposit Haircuts.
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 03/31/2013 15:11 -0400

A day after former Cypriot President Vassilou was found to be among many elite Cypriot (politicians and businessmen) who had loans written-off by the major (now insolvent) banks; it appears the rot is far fouler than expected. In a somewhat stunning (or purely coincidental) revelation, ENETEnglish reports that Cypriot newspaper Haravgi claims that current President Nicos Anastasiades' family businesses transferred 'dozens of millions' from their Laiki Bank accounts to London just a week before the devastating depositor haircuts were unleashed upon his people. Of course, the denials are loud and Anastasiades has demanded an investigation into the claims; we are sure the government-selected 'independent' committee will be as thorough as the Libor anti-trust investigators. As a reminder, as we noted yesterday, here are Cyprus' gun control laws.

MORE @  zerohedge

Whistle
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#31
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pla...pcBMpbuG0Q
Fr Coughlin Warns of Warmonger Propagandists and their Financial Control
Quote:Uploaded on Oct 30, 2011


Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939: Father Charles E. Coughlin warns of the war propagandists, their system of financial control and their evil "blood business"

http://libertyfight.com/Father_Charles_E_Coughlin.html

Dunno

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#32
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-01...cation-day
Quote:List Released With 132 Names Who Pulled Cyprus Deposits Ahead Of "Confiscation Day"
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 04/01/2013 12:51 -0400

EurozoneUnited Kingdom


With every passing day, it becomes clearer and clearer the Cyprus deposit confiscation "news" was the most unsurprising outcome for the nation's financial system and was known by virtually everyone on the ground days and weeks in advance: first it was disclosed that Russians had been pulling their  money, then it was suggested the president himself had made sure some €21 million of his family's money was parked safely in London, then we showed a massive surge in Cyprus deposit outflows in February, and now the latest news is that a list of 132 companies and individuals has emerged who withdrew their €-denominated deposits in the two weeks from March 1 to March 15, among which the previously noted company Loutsios & Sons which is alleged to have ties with the current Cypriot president Anastasiadis.

From Sigma:

Money transfers made within 15 days, namely from 1 until March 15. On Friday, March 15, had met the Eurogroup, which officially decided to impose a tax on deposits by companies and individuals in all financial institutions in Cyprus.



These 132 companies and individuals have withdrawn all deposits in euros, dollars and rubles, which were transferred to other banks outside Cyprus.



The disclosure of the list, which shows that the outflow of deposits from local banks other financial institutions outside Cyprus became massively raises suspicion that some had inside information about the decisions taken by the other 16 eurozone countries in exchange for financing deficits of the economy.



In listings, and the company is Loutsios & Sons Ltd, which carried 21 million deposit in a UK bank, while the owner of the company is alleged to have family ties with the President of the Republic, Nikos Anastasiadis.



The first column are names of companies and individuals in the second record of the amounts withdrawn in the third column refers to the amount withdrawn in the same currency, the currency in the fourth and the fifth and last column refers to the date of transfer.
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#33
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-31...d-solution
Quote:Just last week Yiannakis Omirou, Cypriot House of Representatives President, was calling for the nation to accept it is "time for responsibility" as they progressed towards a final solution; and yet today, as Cyprus' Famagusta reports, he believes the 'Troika-imposed' responsibility will, "turn Cyprus into a colony of the worst possible type." His 'Icelandic' solution is to "leave the Troika and EMS behind," to ensure "national independence, national sovereignty, moral integrity, and economic independence." He may have a point; judging from the chart below of the Troika's poster-child Greece, relative to Iceland, things are not going so well. As Omirou ominously concludes, "if we remain bound by the Troika and the memorandum Cyprus’ destiny is already foretold and there will be no future."
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