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Of mushrooms mice and men ammendments amen meant.
#1
http://www.infowars.com/adam-kokesh-raid...oper-cops/

Low doses of psychedelic drug erases conditioned fear in mice(Sheople)  Sheep

by Anne Delotto Baier http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-07-do...ioned.html

Quote:Psilocybin, which exerts psychoactive effects, has been isolated from certain mushrooms.
(Medical Xpress)—Low doses of a psychedelic drug erased the conditioned fear response in mice, suggesting that the agent may be a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and related conditions, a new study by University of South Florida researchers found.


The unexpected finding was made by a USF team studying the effects of the compound psilocybin on the birth of new neurons in the brain and on learning and short-term memory formation. Their study appeared online June 2 in the journal Experimental Brain Research, in advance of print publication.


Psilocybin belongs to a class of compounds that stimulate select serotonin receptors in the brain. It occurs naturally in certain mushrooms that have been used for thousands of years by non-Western cultures in their religious ceremonies.

While past studies indicate psilocybin may alter perception and thinking and elevate mood, the psychoactive substance rarely causes hallucinations in the sense of seeing or hearing things that are not there, particularly in lower to moderate doses.

There has been recent renewed interest in medicine to explore the potential clinical benefit of psilocybin, MDMA and some other psychedelic drugs through carefully monitored, evidence-based research.


"Researchers want to find out if, at lower doses, these drugs could be safe and effective additions to psychotherapy for treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders or adjunct treatments for certain neurological conditions," said Juan Sanchez-Ramos, MD, PhD, professor of neurology and Helen Ellis Endowed Chair for Parkinson's Disease Research at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine.

Dr. Sanchez-Ramos and his colleagues wondered about psilocybin's role in the formation of short-term memories, since the agent binds to a serotonin receptor in the hippocampus, a region of the brain that gives rise to new neurons. Lead author for this study was neuroscientist Briony Catlow, a former PhD student in Dr. Sanchez-Ramos' USF laboratory who has since joined the Lieber Institute for Brain Development, a translational neuroscience research center located in the Johns Hopkins Bioscience Park.

The USF researchers investigated how psilocybin affected the formation of memories in mice using a classical conditioning experiment. They expected that psilocybin might help the mice learn more quickly to associate a neutral stimulus with an unpleasant environmental cue.


[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQyz3HB1yTPk9euIjFp2BS...n3r_7IZj0g]


Quote:To test the hypothesis, they played an auditory tone, followed by a silent pause before delivering a brief shock similar to static electricity. The mice eventually learned to link the tone with the shock and would freeze, a fear response, whenever they heard the sound.

Later in the study, the researchers played the sound without shocking the mice after each silent pause. They assessed how many times it took for the mice to resume their normal movements, without freezing in anticipation of the shock.

Regardless of the doses administered, neither psilocybin nor ketanserin, a serotonin inhibitor, made a difference in how quickly the mice learned the conditioned fear response. However, mice receiving low doses of psilocybin lost their fearful response to the sound associated with the unpleasant shock significantly more quickly than mice getting either ketanserin or saline (control group). In addition, only low doses of psilocybin tended to increase the growth of neurons in the hippocampus.

"Psilocybin enhanced forgetting of the unpleasant memory associated with the tone," Dr. Sanchez-Ramos said. "The mice more quickly dissociated the shock from the stimulus that triggered the fear response and resumed their normal behavior."

The result suggests that psilocybin or similar compounds may be useful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder or related conditions in which environmental cues trigger debilitating behavior like anxiety or addiction, Dr. Sanchez-Ramos said.


Explore further: The potential of psilocybin to alleviate psychological distress in cancer patients is revealed


[Image: 1306221_w160_h90.jpg]

Quote:More information: "Effects of psilocybin on hippocampal neurogenesis and extinction of trace fear conditioning," Briony J. Catlow, Shijie Song, Daniel A. Paredes, Cheryl L. Kirstein and Juan Sanchez-Ramos; Experimental Brain Research, published online June 2, 2013; DOI 10.1007/s00221-013-3579-0


Provided by University of South Florida

Caught in a room with some shrooms he behaves in his man-cave/office like the ancients did.
He sees spirals from the past.
Only to be raided by an enemy tribe.

just sayin'  ... maybe shrooms alleviates his fear of tyranny.
There are precedents for this behavior.

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#2
We have a study where a man asked a populace to march in peace together.

That man decided to walk alone.

studies clearly demonstrate that this route to the mystical is not to be walked alone.

The settings of both experiments are similar.
Yet note the response from the lab to the real world.


Dare to:

Quote:Caught in a room with some shrooms he behaves in his man-cave/office like the ancients did.
He sees spirals from the past.
Only to be raided by an enemy tribe.

just sayin'  ... maybe shrooms alleviates his fear of tyranny.
There are precedents for this behavior.

compare to:

Quote:For Griffiths’ current experiment, participants were housed in a living room-like setting designed to be calm, comfortable and attractive. While under the influence, they listened to classical music on headphones, wore eyeshades and were instructed to “direct their attention inward.”
Each participant was accompanied by two other research-team members: a “monitor” and an “assistant monitor,” who both had previous experience with people on psychedelic drugs and were empathetic and supportive. Before the drug sessions, the volunteers became acquainted enough with their team so that they felt familiar and safe. Although the experiments took place in the Hopkins hospital complex in order to ensure prompt medical attention in the event that it was needed, it never was.

Adam Kokesh's case:

I think Mushrooms are a legal pursuant to the 'pursuit of happiness!' clause.
Mice and Men?  Hmm2 is he alone?  Dunno




‘Magic Mushrooms’ Can Improve Psychological Health Long Term
11:10 PM Consciousness, Health Leave a Comment By: Maia Szalavitz

The psychedelic drug in magic mushrooms may have lasting medical and spiritual benefits, according to new research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
[Image: magiccc.jpg]

Quote:The psychedelic drug in magic mushrooms may have lasting medical and spiritual benefits, according to new research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
The mushroom-derived hallucinogen, called psilocybin, is known to trigger transformative spiritual states, but at high doses it can also result in “bad trips” marked by terror and panic. The trick is to get the dose just right, which the Johns Hopkins researchers report having accomplished.
In their study, the Hopkins scientists were able to reliably induce transcendental experiences in volunteers, which offered long-lasting psychological growth and helped people find peace in their lives — without the negative effects.
“The important point here is that we found the sweet spot where we can optimize the positive persistent effects and avoid some of the fear and anxiety that can occur and can be quite disruptive,” says lead author Roland Griffiths, professor of behavioral biology at Hopkins.
Giffiths’ study involved 18 healthy adults, average age 46, who participated in five eight-hour drug sessions with either psilocybin — at varying doses — or placebo. Nearly all the volunteers were college graduates and 78% participated regularly in religious activities; all were interested in spiritual experience.
Fourteen months after participating in the study, 94% of those who received the drug said the experiment was one of the top five most meaningful experiences of their lives; 39% said it was the single most meaningful experience.
Critically, however, the participants themselves were not the only ones who saw the benefit from the insights they gained: their friends, family member and colleagues also reported that the psilocybin experience had made the participants calmer, happier and kinder.
Ultimately, Griffiths and his colleagues want to see if the same kind of psychedelic experience could help ease anxiety and fear over the long term in cancer patients or others facing death. And following up on tantalizing clues from early research on hallucinogenic drugs like LSD, mescaline and psilocybin in the 1960s (which are all now illegal), researchers are also studying whether transcendental experiences could help spur recovery from addiction and treat other psychological problems like depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.
For Griffiths’ current experiment, participants were housed in a living room-like setting designed to be calm, comfortable and attractive. While under the influence, they listened to classical music on headphones, wore eyeshades and were instructed to “direct their attention inward.”
Each participant was accompanied by two other research-team members: a “monitor” and an “assistant monitor,” who both had previous experience with people on psychedelic drugs and were empathetic and supportive. Before the drug sessions, the volunteers became acquainted enough with their team so that they felt familiar and safe. Although the experiments took place in the Hopkins hospital complex in order to ensure prompt medical attention in the event that it was needed, it never was.
As described by early advocates of the use of psychedelics — from ancient shamans to Timothy Leary and the Grateful Dead — the psilocybin experience typically involves a sense of oneness with the universe and with others, a feeling of transcending time, space and other limitations, coupled with a sense of holiness and sacredness. Overwhelmingly, these experiences are difficult to put into words, but many of Griffiths’ participants said they were left with the sense that they understood themselves and others better and therefore had greater compassion and patience.
“I feel that I relate better in my marriage. There is more empathy — a greater understanding of people and understanding their difficulties and less judgment,” said one participant. “Less judging of myself, too.”
Another said: “I have better interaction with close friends and family and with acquaintances and strangers. … My alcohol use has diminished dramatically.”
To zero in on the “sweet spot” of dosing, Griffiths started half the volunteers on a low dose and gradually increased their doses over time (with placebo sessions randomly interspersed); the other half started on a high dose and worked their way down.
Those who started on a low dose found that their experiences tended to get better as the dose increased, probably because they learned what to expect and how to handle it. But people who started with high doses were more likely to experience anxiety and fear (though these feeling didn’t last long and sometimes resolved into euphoria or a sense of transcendence).
“If we back the dose down a little, we have just as much of the same positive effects. The properties of the mystical experience remain the same, but there’s a fivefold drop in anxiety and fearfulness,” Griffiths says.
Some past experiments with psychedelics in the ’60s used initial high doses of the drugs — the “blast people away with a high dose” model, says Griffiths — to try to treat addiction. “Some of the early work in addictions was done with the idea of, ‘O.K., let’s model the ‘bottoming-out’ crisis and make use of the dark side of [psychedelic] compounds. That didn’t work,” Griffiths says.
It may even have backfired: other research on addictions shows that coercion, humiliation and other attempts to produce a sense of “powerlessness,” tend to increase relapse and treatment dropout, not recovery. (And the notorious naked LSD encounter sessions conducted with psychopaths made them worse, too.)
Griffiths is currently seeking patients with terminal cancer to participate in his next set of experiments (for more information on these studies, click here); because psychedelics often produce a feeling of going beyond life and death, they are thought to be especially likely to help those facing the end of life. Griffiths is also studying whether psilocybin can help smokers quit.
Griffiths and other researchers like him are hoping to bring the study of psychedelics into the future. They want to build on the promise that some of the early research showed, while avoiding the bad rep and exaggerated claims — for example, that LSD was harmless and could usher in world peace — that became associated with the drugs when people started using them recreationally in the 1960s. The resulting negative publicity helped shut down the burgeoning research.
This time around, caution may be paying off. Dr. Jerome Jaffe, America’s first drug czar, who was not involved with the research, said in a statement, “The Hopkins psilocybin studies clearly demonstrate that this route to the mystical is not to be walked alone. But they have also demonstrated significant and lasting benefits. That raises two questions: could psilocybin-occasioned experiences prove therapeutically useful, for example in dealing with the psychological distress experienced by some terminal patients?
“And should properly-informed citizens, not in distress, be allowed to receive psilocybin for its possible spiritual benefits, as we now allow them to pursue other possibly risky activities such as cosmetic surgery and mountain-climbing?”
Source: healthland.time.com

 


[sub]If you knew that every breath you took could save hundreds of lives in the future, had you walked down this path of knowledge, wouldn't you run down that path of knowledge as fast as you could?

-paul stamets[/sub]
[sup]Mushroom mycelium represents rebirth, rejuvenation, regeneration. Fungi generate soil that gives life.

The task that we face today is to understand the language of nature. My mission is to discover the language of nature, of the fungal networks that communicate with the ecosystem. And I in particular believe that nature is intelligent. The fact that we lack the language skills to communicate with nature does not impugn the concept that nature is intelligent; it speaks to the inadequacy of our skillset for communication.

We have now learned that there are these languages that are occurring, and communication between each organism. If we don't get our act together, and come into commonality and understanding with the organisms that sustain us today, not only will we destroy those organisms but we will destroy ourselves.

We need to have a paradigm shift in our consciousness. What will it take to achieve that?

If I die trying, but I'm inadequate to the task, to make a course change in the evolution of life on the planet...okay, I tried. But the fact is: I tried. How many people are not trying?

If you knew that every breath you took could save hundreds of lives in the future, had you walked down this path of knowledge, wouldn't you run down that path of knowledge as fast as you could?

I believe nature is a force of good. Good is not only a concept, it is a spirit - and so, hopefully, the spirit of goodness will survive.

[/sup]
http://www.dailygrail.com/videos/2008/5/...Save-World



Quote:“The Hopkins psilocybin studies clearly demonstrate that this route to the mystical is not to be walked alone.

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQyz3HB1yTPk9euIjFp2BS...n3r_7IZj0g]

But they have also demonstrated significant and lasting benefits. -Dr. Jerome Jaffe

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#3

Sanjay Gupta: Actually, Weed’s Fine Health-Wise  Reefer

[Image: cnn+-+sanjau+gupta+2.jpg]

Quote:Sanjay Gupta changed his opinion on marijuana on Wednesday in light of research for his documentary "Weed" premiering on Sunday. Gupta now says the health effects are negligible. CNN's chief medical correspondent apologized for "misleading" the public and now supports medical use of the substance.
Date: 3 hrs ago Views: 2
http://video.ca.msn.com/watch/video/sanj...%257c%257c

Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#4
Improv is... as now was... yesteryear.

This thread began at first post with one man attending his post.

Walking tall on the mall.
Armed by his rightful self determination.

Before this current  situation was a future-past.

One man walks away from his past post.
Unarmed by his rightful self ascertation.

Of Mice and Men...

Let the mushrooms only be psychedelic clouds and metaphor not real war.


Quote:From the moment the father of Bowe Bergdahl took the stage with President Barack Obama, it was clear the Bergdahls were not an average US military family.


Sporting a long, bushy beard that he refused to trim since his son went missing in 2009, Bob Bergdahl spoke Pashto, Afghanistan's main language, and also a few words of Arabic at the White House press conference announcing his son's release.


Some critics of the deal to free the only remaining American prisoner of war have shifted their attention to Mr Bergdahl and his controversial statements.

Just a few days before his son was released in a trade for five Guantanamo detainees, Mr Bergdalh tweeted at a Taliban spokesman saying, 'I am still working to free all Guantanamo prisoners.'

'God will repay for the death of every Afghan child, ameen.'


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...child.html

Of mushrooms mice and men ammendments amen meant.

[move]'God will repay for the death of every Afghan child, ameen.'[/move]

I Am just as unsure as I'm sure he Meant Amen.

The Power of Improv stands by that statement.

In fact it is part and parcel and acts grammaticaly and psychodramaticaly as a past particible of this present thread as well as the titles main point.

[Image: article-2646764-1E5EA54700000578-503_634x358.jpg]


Amen ...was...Meant.

Improv is an  Never-Ending "Ammending".

Kinda like a continuum but not really.
More like an anonymous script.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#5
Quote:« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 10:20:44 PM »

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We have a study where a man asked a populace to march in peace together.

That man decided to walk alone.

studies clearly demonstrate that this route to the mystical is not to be walked alone.

The settings of both experiments are similar.
Yet note the response from the lab to the real world.


Dare to: 

[Image: article-2646764-1E6B338C00000578-245_634x462.jpg]

[move]Improvise[/move]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply


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