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How to dissappear a short runway...
#1
Quote: Dunno [Image: 13416463524_27ea8a8aa7_o_d.gif]  Dunno

[Image: coneofsilence.jpg]
Quote: The NEXRAD antenna cannot point higher than 19.5 degrees above the horizon, so there is a volume above the radar that never gets scanned, called the "cone of silence."

[Image: vcp11.gif]


[Image: 21891005-aerial-view-of-rice-field-terra...ailand.jpg]

An "Aquaplane" landing strip and  natural/artificial tropical camoflague canopy.

[Image: FRIM_canopy.JPG]




Quote:[flash=420,315]http://www.youtube.com/v/KJaoVVNEBDA?[/flash]



Pick an Island any island.

[Image: 52-card-pick-up.jpg]
Pick A Country any country.

Where's the luggage?
Where's the little girl's doll?
The little boy's baseball cap?
Mommy?
Daddy?

[Image: Jungle-Adventure-1.jpg]

A Styrofoam cup???  Dunno

Devil Where's the n u k e? Devil

[Image: 140314-malaysia-lead-plane-6a_dd2c5f25ba...1b7874.jpg]


Rice Paddies...  Hmm2
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#2
Dunno Dunno[Image: Paddy-Planter-Portable-Rice-Paddy-Seeder-Machinery.jpg] Dunno Dunno
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#3
Itz Possible???

4 years ago...


Aircraft makes emergency landing in rice paddy in East Kalimantan

Nurni Sulaiman, The Jakarta Post, Balikpapan, East Kalimantan | National | Thu, February 11 2010, 1:52 PM


Quote:A twin turbo-prop small aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing in a rice paddy in Kutai Kartanegara, East Kalimantan, following engine failure, injuring at least two passengers in the process.

The aircraft, an ATR-42-300 operated by PT Trigana Air, was carrying 46 passengers and five crew from Tanjung Selor City to Samarinda when the engine failed.
Roesmanto, head of flight security and safety at Termindung Airport in Samarinda, told Antara state news agency that the pilot had planned to make an emergency landing at Sepinggan International Airport in Balikpapan, which is bigger than Termindung Airport.

However, the plane was unable to reach the airport and was forced to land in the rice field located near the 45 kilometer marker on the Balikpapan to Samarinda highway at around 11:30 a.m. local time.

Dunno Dunno  http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/...antan.html  Dunno Dunno
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#4
Homegrown art  Reefer Reefer Reefer
 
by Yoko Hani Aug 26, 2007  

[Image: fl20070826x1c-200x169.jpg]
 
When is a paddy not a paddy? When it’s a canvas, of course. But as [size=10pt]staff writer YOKO HANI discovered in northern Aomori Prefecture, what’s nice to look at is rice to eat as well. [/size]

Quote:Mysterious “corn circles” of incredible complexity that appear overnight, or a baseball park as in the 1989 film “Field of Dreams” — who knows what you might come across in your local rural idyll these days.

But travel some 600 km north of Tokyo, then take a drive off the beaten track. There, in a village in verdant Aomori Prefecture, who would ever expect to find exquisite Edo Period artworks sprouting amid a swaying green sea of enormous rice paddies?

It’s neither a dream, a supernatural mystery, nor fiction.

Instead, by precisely planting four varieties of rice with differently colored leaves in fields their ancestors have farmed for centuries, the people of Inakadate Village have this year grown remarkable reproductions of famous woodblock prints by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). And this is no cheap gimmick — the images from the artist’s “Fugaku Sanjurokkei (Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji)” on the 15,000-sq.-meter paddies are nothing if not spectacular in both their scale and detail — even as every day brings them nearer to annihilation in the September harvest.

From ground level, the artistic paddies spread out before the Inakadate Village office building are, like those corn circles that crop up in England at this time of year, invisible. However, by scaling (for free) a 22-meter-high mock castle tower that’s part of the village office and overlooks the fields, visitors are rewarded with a view that takes their breath away. And, as a boon to the local economy, it’s a field of dreams as well, with around 150,000 visitors drawn to the village of 8,700 souls in the last few months alone.

“People who see this for the first time often ask me if we made this by painting colors on green rice plants,” says Akio Nakayama, who leads the rice paddy art project, while viewing the multicolored rice fields from the village office. Nakayama, an official of the office’s industries section, has been working on the art project for more than 10 years.

“This year’s Hokusai design was very challenging,” he says. “We weren’t sure if we could really pull it off — but we did.”

Inakadate Village started to create rice-paddy art in 1993 as a local revitalization project. No one will take credit for the idea, which seems to have just grown out of meetings of the village committee.

In the first nine years, the village office workers and local farmers grew a simple design of Mount Iwaki in Aomori Prefecture every year, accompanied by the words “Inakadate, a village of rice culture.” Then, by planting rice varieties with different colors of foliage on about 2,500 sq. meters of rice paddies, they quite literally brought their designs to life.

But as time went by, the locals’ horizons widened and the pictures they tried to transform into fields of art became more and more complicated. Not surprisingly, over the years more and more people also began to pay attention to their extraordinary endeavors.

Then, in 2005, after agreements between landowners allowed the creation of enormous, 15,000-sq.-meter rice paddies, the villagers painstakingly plotted their planting on paper plans and created huge-scale reproductions of Edo Period ukiyo-e works by Sharaku and Utamaro. That year, around 130,000 visitors sought out this beautiful backwater to marvel at the arable artwork.

Last year another revolution occurred in this creative corner of the northernmost prefecture of the mainland of Japan, when the village organizers of the paddy pictures for the first time used computers to precisely plot planting of the four differently colored rice varieties that bring the images to life. The result was an astonishing set of reproductions of paintings from the famous “Fujin Raijin Zu Byobu (Wind God and Thunder God Screens)” by the early Edo Period artist Tawaraya Sotatsu, and also some 200,000 visitors who went along to see the grass images.

“I feel happy to see many people come to see our rice paddies because, here in Inakadate Village, rice and people’s lives are very closely connected,” Nakayama says.

In fact, he says the idea for this “modern” project came out of the village’s ancient history of rice cultivation.

“In 1981, when we did construction work for a new road, we dug up some rice paddies that archaeologists dated as being about 2,000 years old. That impressed us local people a lot, because we realized how long people have been growing rice in this place.

“So then we thought that we had to do something involving rice to revitalize this area — and that was the origin of this project.”

From that germ of an idea sprang the paddy-art project, which has come to involve not only local farmers but many of their friends and neighbors, too.

So now, every year, the project starts in April, when the pictures to be planted in Inakadate Village’s rice paddies are decided upon at local meetings. After that, six staff at the village office make an elaborate plan of how to plant different colors of rice to create the image. They calculate and plot the precise areas where each different color of rice needs to be planted in the paddies, and produce a printout of the design that at first just looks like a mass of dots.

This year, the six village office workers spent 15 days of their own private time, working until late at night, to complete the planting plan. Their calculations are not just simple painting-by-numbers layouts, but include sophisticated use of perspective so that the paddy pictures appear perfectly proportioned when viewed from the observation “castle.”

“Using computers has greatly shortened the time it takes to calculate the position of one dot on the rice paddies,” Nakayama says, referring to the markers needed to determine where to plant each of the different rice varieties. “At the same time,” he adds, “it has made it possible to calculate many more dots to draw the picture more precisely.

“This year we calculated the location of 6,100 dots for our Hokusai design, compared with 1,500 dots two years ago. If we have more dots for a picture, we can reproduce the original more precisely on the rice paddies.”

Dots on a printout are all very well — but the most sensitive and difficult task is digging reed sticks into the bare spring paddies at exactly the right points so that those who plant the rice know where to position each of the four varieties. This year, five groups of six village-office staff dug some 6,100 reed sticks into the ground, then strung plastic tape between them to create the areas — some large, some only a meter square — in which to plant the rice varieties. Altogether, the task took three full, backbreaking days.

Then, on May 27, a total of 700 people took part in the rice-planting event. They included 50 visitors from outside the prefecture — people from as far afield as Hokkaido, Kanagawa and Osaka — alongside 450 from nearby towns and villages. Divided into teams, they used four kinds of rice: two ancient varieties called ki ine (yellow rice) and murasaki ine (purple rice) that grow into yellow- and brown-leafed plants respectively, and also more modern Beni Miyako (Red Miyako) and Tsugaru Roman, an Aomori variety with a fresh-green color.

After that, the artworks were in the hands of nature as the seedlings began growing in varying hues into Hokusai’s famous wave amid Inakadate Village’s sea of swaying rice plants.

“Late July was the best time to enjoy the art,” Nakayama says, “because now in August, the lengths of each kind of rice are different due to their different growth rates. Now, we cannot clearly see the drops falling off the waves, as the yellow rice for the drops is shorter than Tsugaru Roman. So by now the drops have begun sinking into the green background of the Tsugaru Roman.”

But whatever defects such experienced eyes may detect, the number of visitors flocking for their free view of the paddy-artists’ amazing, living creations just keeps on increasing.

So far this season, with a month to go before the harvest, more than 150,000 visitors have already found their way to Inakadate Village, 10 km east of Hirosaki City, to view Hokusai’s wave in verdant Technicolor. On weekends, especially, locals are outnumbered by the 6,000 to 7,000 visitors.

“Oh, it’s so busy. Visitors have to wait in line for about an hour to go up the observatory, and staff are busy talking to them, seeing that they are all right,” Nakayama says. “But I feel that our efforts are being rewarded when I see so many people enjoying the art.”

While it may be busy now, Inakadate Village is bracing itself for an even bigger influx on Sept. 30. Then, as the cool breezes of autumn bathe the land, it’s anyone’s guess how many will turn up to take part in the annual harvest. Last year, around 900 people from across the country harvested about 2 tons of Tsugaru Roman rice, which was given to those who took part and to those who helped with the spring planting.

Then, as one year’s transient beauty is cut down, Nakayama and other Inakadate Village officials will begin turning their minds to next year’s artistic crop — and to hosting seminars at the request of other farming communities around Japan on the practical details of creating rice-paddy art.

[Image: fl20070826x1b-200x200.jpg]

So what form of art will grow in their rice paddies next year?

“Well, I don’t know yet,” Nakayama says. “But one thing’s for sure: we have more ambitious plans for our rice-paddy art every year.”
























































































Although Rice Paddies require an ankle deep flooding.
Properly dispensed.


A Tsunami is overkill metaphorically,eh? Lefty.  Rofl

[Image: fl20070826x1a-200x188.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#5
Quote: No Snake-Oil Ya'll

Eye can't cure a leper / con.

Leprechaun: Reefer

Quote:[quote][Image: 1979679_10200745555880109_1456206280_n.jpg]

My pot-o'gold that water is cold !!!

Oh yeah... Happy belated SssAin't rice paddie's   Hmm2
(Howz My Spelling? Linke?)    Dunno Dunno Dunno     
[i]
what’s nice to look at is rice to eat as well.

[Image: Paddy-Planter-Portable-Rice-Paddy-Seeder-Machinery.jpg]

[Image: cast.jpg]

[b]Where's the plane that should be plain to see?

[Image: singletubeblack.jpg]

tattoo that in your possibility  Hmm2





Quote:[flash=420,315]http://www.youtube.com/v/KJaoVVNEBDA?[/flash]




Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#6

[Image: malaysia-plane.jpg]

Quote:A Styrofoam cup???  Dunno
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#7
Runway?   Dunno
Oops  I mean. Hmm2
Landing Strip?   Dunno

flooding is relative to rice.
Rice rhymes with dice.

Letz  Roll.

]
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Reply
#8
Malaysian plane drama fuels aviation security rethink

14 hours ago by Bhavan Jaipragas
   
[Image: aviewfromabo.jpg]
view from a Boeing 777 passenger jet, cruising at fourty thousand feet, seen on July 24, 2012


Quote:As the hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 enters a third week, the piecemeal returns from one of the most intense, international searches in living memory have delivered a public and institutional shock that could force a major rethink about aviation security.

The fact that a Boeing-777 equipped with state-of-the-art location tracking technology could vanish for so long, is in itself, aviation experts say, shocking enough to compel changes in the way commercial aircraft are electronically monitored.

One priority would be to enhance tracking coverage for a plane in an emergency situation that forces it beyond the reach of conventional radar systems.

It was modern satellite imagery that pointed MH370 investigators to a remote part of the Indian Ocean 2,500 kilometres (1,500 miles) southwest of Perth, but the physical search for debris in the area had to rely on less sophisticated methods—binoculars held to the windows of spotter planes.

If a crash site is finally located, investigators will have to rush to find the plane's crucial "black box" before it stops emitting its tracking signals.

"There's no doubt that what has gone on is one of the greatest mysteries of modern aviation and it will have an impact on the global aviation and airline industry," Jonathan Galaviz, partner at the US-based travel and aviation consultancy firm Global Market Advisors, told AFP.

"I expect there will be a real examination of the kind of recording technology we have right now in airplanes, a debate on how they are designed and how long they can last," Galaviz said.

Live data streaming?

"There will also be discussion about live satellite streaming of such data so that it can constantly be monitored," he added.

The separate flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder currently send pings for about 30 days—a timespan that could well be reconsidered given the unprecedented length of the search for the Malaysian airliner.

[Image: thearrivalbo.jpg]
The arrival board shows the missing Malaysia Airlines flight (top, in red) as 'cancelled', at Beijing International Airport, on March 8, 2014

The mystery of MH370 owes much to the abrupt nature of its "disappearance".

Nearly one hour into its flight, both its automated signalling systems ceased to function and the plane dropped off civilian radar.

The immediate assumption was of a catastrophic event that plunged the plane into the South China Sea before any distress call could be made.


But sketchy satellite and military radar showed that, in fact, the aircraft had veered sharply off course, backtracked across the Malaysian peninsula, and then flown on—possibly for hours—in a northerly or southerly direction.

Technology already exists for passenger jets to immediately relay the black box data via satellite, but most commercial airlines have baulked at the prospect of investing millions in such systems, as bottom lines come under pressure due to rising fuel costs and increasing competition.

Major airlines, including Malaysia Airlines, have access to the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS), a digital datalink via satellite or VHS radio, for brief text messages from aircraft, but they do not compare with the parameters that the flight data recorder monitors.

In the case of Flight 370, the ACARS, which was supposed to transmit data every 30 minutes, failed to send messages after the aircraft fell off civilian radar.

Minimising upgrade costs

Andrew Herdman, director-general of the Asia Pacific Airlines Association, said costs for satellite-linked black boxes could be minimised by programming them to transmit data to ground controllers only when an in-flight abnormality is detected.


[Image: twomalaysian.jpg]
Two Malaysian Airlines planes are seen obscured by haze on the tarmac at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, on March 9, 2014

Such abnormalities might include the disabling of communications systems or a sudden deviation from the flight plan.

"The idea of live streaming the black boxes would also entail an enormous amount of data being transmitted on any given day and that in itself would also be a huge logistical challenge," he told AFP.

Greg Waldron, the Asia managing editor for aviation industry magazine Flightglobal, said the uptake of such technology by airlines would be a "slow and gradual process".

Airlines may move faster if leading civil aviation regulators including the US Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency decide to make such systems mandatory for their respective jurisdictions within a set deadline, he said.

"There is still a sense of shock that a modern aircraft like the Boeing 777 can just go missing, and I'm sure there will (be) more robust monitoring as we go along," he said.

Galaviz said rekindled debate over aviation security was always an important and constructive by-product of events like the disappearance of MH370.

"Aside from the tragedy of it all and the unanswered questions, perhaps at this point we need to take a step back and acknowledge that despite all of it there may be some positives that come out of it," he said.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-03-malaysian-p...n.html#jCp




"The airlines have a lot of data on what a successful pilot looks like, and the mental aspect is a big part of that," says Brad Tate, a pilot for a leading U.S. airline. He said he's known applicants who were rejected because of their performance on a standardized mental test.

"I have never once flown with somebody who I questioned their mental health," Tate says.

Once a pilot is hired, however, U.S. airlines rarely if ever test a pilot again for mental health, say several experienced pilots. According to Federal Aviation Administration rules, U.S. pilots must pass a physical exam annually or every six months, depending on their age, but there is no specific requirement for a mental-health test. Once a pilot is hired, however, U.S. airlines rarely if ever test a pilot again for mental health, say several experienced pilots. According to Federal Aviation Administration rules, U.S. pilots must pass a physical exam annually or every six months, depending on their age, but there is no specific requirement for a mental-health test.

Buried in 333 pages of instructions, the FAA tells doctors that they should "form a general impression of the emotional stability and mental state" of the pilot.

The FAA does require pilots to report any use of prescription drugs, substance abuse, arrests for drunken driving, "mental disorders of any sort" and if they have attempted suicide. Some conditions disqualify a person from being an airline pilot, including bipolar disease, a "severe" and repeated personality disorder, and psychosis. To a large degree, though, pilots are on the honor system. If they don't tell their doctor or check a box on a government form that they're depressed or suicidal, there is no certainty anyone will ever find out."



Pilots' mental health a concern amid jet mystery

1 hour ago by David Koenig
   
[Image: pilotsmental.jpg]
In this March 23, 2014 photo, a woman walks past a message board for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at a shopping mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. With no answers yet in the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, investigators have said they're considering many options: hijacking, sabotage, terrorism or catastrophic equipment failure. Nobody knows if the pilots are heroes who tried to save a crippled airliner or if one collaborated with hijackers or was on a suicide mission. The mystery has raised concerns about whether airlines and governments do enough to make sure that pilots are mentally fit to fly. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)



Quote:Reinforced doors with keypad entries. Body scanners and pat-downs. Elaborate crew maneuvers when a pilot has to use the restroom. All those tactics are designed to keep dangerous people out of the cockpit. But what if the pilot is the problem?

With no answers yet in the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370; investigators have said they're considering many options: hijacking, sabotage, terrorism or catastrophic equipment failure. Nobody knows if the pilots are heroes who tried to save a crippled airliner or if one collaborated with hijackers or was on a suicide mission.

Whatever the outcome, the mystery has raised concerns about whether airlines and governments do enough to make sure that pilots are mentally fit to fly.

"One of the most dangerous things that can happen is the rogue captain," said John Gadzinski, a Boeing 737 captain and aviation-safety consultant. "If you get somebody who—for whatever reason—turns cancerous and starts going on their own agenda, it can be a really bad situation."

Malaysia Airlines said this week that its pilots take psychological tests during the hiring process.

"We will obviously look into all these and see whether we can strengthen, tighten all the various entry requirements and examinations," CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said. He did not describe the tests.

Many U.S. airlines also perform mental health screenings when pilots and crew apply for jobs.

"The airlines have a lot of data on what a successful pilot looks like, and the mental aspect is a big part of that," says Brad Tate, a pilot for a leading U.S. airline. He said he's known applicants who were rejected because of their performance on a standardized mental test.

"I have never once flown with somebody who I questioned their mental health," Tate says.

Once a pilot is hired, however, U.S. airlines rarely if ever test a pilot again for mental health, say several experienced pilots. According to Federal Aviation Administration rules, U.S. pilots must pass a physical exam annually or every six months, depending on their age, but there is no specific requirement for a mental-health test.
Buried in 333 pages of instructions, the FAA tells doctors that they should "form a general impression of the emotional stability and mental state" of the pilot.

The FAA does require pilots to report any use of prescription drugs, substance abuse, arrests for drunken driving, "mental disorders of any sort" and if they have attempted suicide. Some conditions disqualify a person from being an airline pilot, including bipolar disease, a "severe" and repeated personality disorder, and psychosis. To a large degree, though, pilots are on the honor system. If they don't tell their doctor or check a box on a government form that they're depressed or suicidal, there is no certainty anyone will ever find out.





About 400,000 U.S. pilots—from the airlines to private aviation and student pilots—apply for a medical certificate each year. From 2008 through 2012, only 1.2 percent were rejected, according to the FAA, which did not say how many failed due to mental-health issues.

In 2010, the FAA lifted a 70-year-old ban on pilots taking antidepressants. Randy Babbitt, then the FAA administrator, said one reason for dropping the ban was a belief that pilots were secretly taking the drugs but just not telling anyone. Federal health officials estimate that nearly 10 percent of the adult population suffers from mood disorders, and aviation officials assume that the rate among pilots is about the same.

The FAA declined to make an official available for an interview.

Gregory Ostrom, a doctor in Elgin, Illinois, estimates that he has seen 200 pilots a month for the past 13 years and calls them "great people." The most common mental issue he sees is obsessive-compulsive behavior—pilots are perfectionists. But he admits that his examinations aren't psychiatric in nature.

"Nobody sits down and says, 'Tell me about your home life,'" he said.

Ostrom said he relies on his experience observing patients to know whether to question a pilot's emotional state. About once every three years he is concerned enough to refer somebody to the FAA for a decision on mental fitness, and those are almost always student pilots, he said. Even if there was a formal psychiatric review, Ostrom is not sure that it would make flying any safer. People can snap months after seeming normal during an exam.

"A person who is suicidal today may not have been for the last 10 years, but his circumstances may have changed dramatically," he said.

Doctors who issue medical clearances must be approved by the FAA. Most are generalists, not psychiatrists, and that troubles New York attorney Jonathan Reiter. He sued JetBlue Airways and reached a confidential settlement on behalf of 35 passengers after a pilot had a nervous breakdown in the middle of a cross-country flight in 2012. He said the pilot got his medical clearance from an osteopath in Florida.

"They hand this off to someone who's not trained in psychiatric investigation, and there's no requirement to conduct a psychiatric interview, even a rudimentary one," Reiter said. "The whole vetting process is paying lip service to the issue of mental illness."

There are about 72,000 airline pilots in the U.S. There have been no fatal accidents on a so-called mainline U.S. airline since 2001, and none on a regional carrier since a Colgan Air plane hired by Continental Airlines crashed in 2009 near Buffalo, New York, killing all 49 people on the plane and one on the ground. That crash was blamed on pilot error. The largest pilots' union says the safety track record validates the screening system.

"You're sitting down with a doctor twice a year, going through a series of questions related to a lot of matters," said Lee Moak, president of the Air Line Pilots Association. "We have the safest airspace in the world. This is another indicator that our members are healthy physically and mentally."

It is rare for the public to hear about a pilot having a mental breakdown, but not unprecedented:

— The JetBlue pilot who left the cockpit and ran through the cabin, ranting about Jesus and al-Qaida. Passengers tackled him, and the co-pilot made an emergency landing in Texas. The 49-year-old pilot had passed his medical exam three months earlier. He was charged with interfering with a flight crew but found not guilty due to insanity. A later psychiatric evaluation was sealed by the court.

— On a cargo flight in 1994, an off-duty FedEx pilot facing a disciplinary hearing attacked the cockpit crew with a hammer and a spear gun before being subdued.

Pilot suicide is suspected in some deadly crashes in other countries:

— A top aviation official in Mozambique said that a preliminary investigation into a November 2013 crash that killed 33 people pointed to a deliberate act by the pilot, who apparently locked the co-pilot out of the cockpit. The investigation is continuing.

— In 1999, U.S. investigators determined that the co-pilot of an EgyptAir plane deliberately crashed into the Atlantic shortly after takeoff from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. All 217 people on board died.

— In 1997, SilkAir Flight 185 plunged into a river in Indonesia, killing all 104 aboard. U.S. investigators said that the pilot probably crashed on purpose, but an Indonesian investigation was inconclusive.

— In 1982, a Japan Airlines jet plunged into Tokyo Bay while approaching Haneda Airport. The captain, who had previously been grounded for mental illness, reversed some of the engines. Twenty-four of the 174 people on board were killed.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-03-mental-heal...y.html#jCp




Quote:
Quote:
Quote: Band


[flash=420,315]http://www.youtube.com/v/XAJKgqezNMc?[/flash]
[Image: fl20070826x1a-200x188.jpg] 


Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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#9
"'I was walking towards the rear of my house when I saw the light, and wondered where it was heading to,' he said. 'The airspace here is like a highway for aircraft and they usually travel in routine patterns.
'However, the light I saw was moving towards a completely different direction. It was going towards the sea, near Bachok (which lies to the south of Mr Alif's home).'
His description tends to indicate that if the light he saw was on the doomed aircraft, it had turned north instead of continuing on its regular north-easterly flight path.

Mr Alif said the aircraft he usually sees fly across the sky for as far as his eyes could see but the light he saw in the early hours of Saturday vanished from view behind a line of coconut trees.
"



Web sleuths claim to have spotted missing Flight MH370:

Student posts 'satellite' image showing a jet over the jungle as thousands join online search for planeImages from map search site show potential 'sightings' of plane and debris

The authenticity of the photos has not yet been verified
Investigators believe plane most likely flew into southern Indian Ocean
News comes as villagers in Malaysia report seeing flight at low altitude


By Sam Webb and Richard Shears
PUBLISHED: 21:44 GMT, 18 March 2014 | UPDATED: 16:30 GMT, 19 March 2014


Quote:Web sleuths from across the world have joined in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 by turning to the map search website Tomnod.
The online community has added to the confusion surrounding the 12 day mystery of the missing jetliner as people post possible sightings and new theories.
Even celebrities have taken to poring over satellite images uploaded to the website and offering up their suggestions as to where the plane might be.
Investigators meanwhile probing the disappearance of the plane believe it most likely flew into the southern Indian Ocean, a source close to the investigation said today.

Courtney Love appears to be the most famous user of Tomnod after she posted a photograph of satellite imagery from the site on her Facebook page on Monday, and suggested: 'I'm no expert but up close this does look like a plane and an oil slick.'
Elsewhere, users of social networking site Reddit have posted an image which they claim appears to show debris from the plane in the Strait of Malacca.
[Image: article-2583807-1C68CD7B00000578-946_634x425.jpg]
Users of social networking site Reddit have posted an image which they claim appears to show debris from the plane on the surface of the Strait of Malacca, along with an overlay which shows the scale of the Boeing 777 (left)Users of social networking site Reddit have posted an image which they claim appears to show debris from the plane on the surface of the Strait of Malacca, along with an overlay which shows the scale of the Boeing 777 (left)



[Image: article-2583807-1C60ADBE00000578-636_634x762.jpg]

[Image: article-2583807-1C3A26DC00000578-374_634x388.jpg]


The area highlighted the same place where crew on a Greek-flagged oil tanker on Sunday responded to radio reports of suitcases found floating on the surface.
Users of Reddit have also suggested the scale of the potential debris matches that of the missing aircraft.

Another image to have gained attention appears to show a plane flying over a jungle, discovered by  a university student in Taiwan, according to Taiwan's China Times.
More...Pictured: The distraught captain fiancée who was about to marry missing Malaysian co-pilot after nine year relationship
Has there been a military cover-up over missing jet? Thai air force says its radar spotted MH370 heading to Strait of Malacca MINUTES after it vanished (but didn't say anything)
Search for missing Malaysia plane narrows to an area the size of Australia
'You are traitors to us... you have let us down. Tell us the truth': Screaming family members of missing MH370 passengers are dragged out of press conference demanding answers as Malaysian officials say Maldives plane sighting 'not true'

DigitalGlobe has uploaded high-resolution satellite and aerial images to its Tomnod site that let people explore the seas for clues about the crash, as well signs of a wreckage or oil slick.
The authenticity of the photo by the Taiwanese student, also posted to Reddit on Sunday, has not yet been verified and online commentators have raised questions over the veracity of the image, with some pointing out it appears to be a different model to the missing Boeing 777. The plane also appears to have been painted white.
The image surfaced at the same time as news emerged that Malaysian villagers claim to have seen the missing jet flying over the north east of the country at around the time the aircraft is thought to have made a 'U-turn'.
Courtney Love posted a snapshot of an area of the ocean she believed could contain the remains of the missing flight MH370 on her Facebook page on MondayCourtney Love posted a snapshot of an area of the ocean she believed could contain the remains of the missing flight MH370 on her Facebook page on Monday
DigitalGlobe has uploaded high-resolution satellite and aerial images to its Tomnod site that let people explore the seas for clues about the crash, as well signs of a wreckage or oil slickDigitalGlobe has uploaded high-resolution satellite and aerial images to its Tomnod site that let people explore the seas for clues about the crash, as well signs of a wreckage or oil slick

At least nine people - tuna fishermen, farmers and villagers - in Kelantan in Malaysia have made reports to police about seeing lights in the sky and some said they heard the loud noise of an engine.
Similarly, residents of a tiny island in the Dhaalu Atoll in the Maldives say they saw a plane with Malaysia Airlines markings in the early hours of Saturday March 8.
HAS THERE BEEN A MILITARY COVER-UP OVER MISSING JET?Asian military officials may be staging a mass cover-up over missing flight MH370, because they do not want to expose gaping holes within their countries' air defences, a leading aviation expert has suggested.

The Malaysian Airlines jet went missing 1.30am on Sunday, March 9. But it was not until the following Tuesday that the Malaysian Air Force reported they had spotted the aircraft on radar over the Strait of Malacca at 2.15am.

Now Thailand's military say they detected a plane at 1.28am, eight minutes after MH370's communications went down, heading towards the Strait but did not share the information because they were not asked for it.

Intensive background checks on everyone aboard had turned up no-one else with a political or criminal motive to crash or hijack the plane.

Writing on his blog, Aviation expert David Learmount said: 'Maybe these states’ air defences, like Malaysia’s, are not what they are cracked up to be. And maybe they wouldn’t want the rest of the world to know that.'

Mr Learmount, a former pilot and now operations and safety editor at the respected Flight Global publication, points out that MH370 might have flown over several Asian countries including Thailand, Burma, China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Turkmenistan and Afghanistan.

He said they may be withholding vital radar data about Flight MH370 for fear it would expose gaping holes in their multi-billion pound air defences.
One said: 'I've never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We've seen seaplanes but I'm sure this was not one of those.'
Malaysia's Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein however told a daily news conference today that the reports had been investigated by police in the Maldives and were determined to be untrue.
Investigators earlier told the New Straits Times that they were now convinced the aircraft flew low over the village, which is in the north east - exactly the same area where the villagers and fishermen in Malaysia who saw bright lights in the sky and heard noises on the night the jet vanished are living.
Investigators told a Malaysian newspaper that the Boeing 777 had dropped to a lower altitude - under 5,000ft - to avoid ground radar, using the surrounding terrain as a sonar barrier.
This type of flying is considered to be dangerous and risky, because it places tremendous pressure on the frame of the aircraft - and flying low at night without radar assistance could lead to the plane crashing into trees or mountains.

The first report of a 'bright light descending at high speed' came from Mr Alif Fathi Abdul Hadi, 29 who said he saw the light heading towards the South China Sea at 1.45am on the night the aircraft disappeared.
Businessman Mr Alif lives in Kampung Kadok, in the far north west of the Malaysian mainland, close to the southern border of Thailand - and the light he witnessed would have been several miles to the north of the flight path the jet was on before it vanished.
Lending credibility to the account by Mr Alif is the claim by fisherman Azid Ibrahim, 55, who saw a bright light streaking overhead at 1.30am on Saturday, about 100 miles south of where Mr Alif had seen the light.
Mr Alif told said the bright light was the type that aircraft use when taking off and landing at night - like a car uses its headlights.
[Image: article-2583807-1C655E2800000578-43_634x399.jpg]
The satellite image from Tomnod, the online map site used by millions in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, shows a passenger plane over a jungleThe satellite image from Tomnod, the online map site used by millions in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, shows a passenger plane over a jungle
Mystery: The image was found by an university student in TaiwanMystery: The image was found by an university student in Taiwan

'I was walking towards the rear of my house when I saw the light, and wondered where it was heading to,' he said. 'The airspace here is like a highway for aircraft and they usually travel in routine patterns.
'However, the light I saw was moving towards a completely different direction. It was going towards the sea, near Bachok (which lies to the south of Mr Alif's home).'
His description tends to indicate that if the light he saw was on the doomed aircraft, it had turned north instead of continuing on its regular north-easterly flight path.

Mr Alif said the aircraft he usually sees fly across the sky for as far as his eyes could see but the light he saw in the early hours of Saturday vanished from view behind a line of coconut trees.

The Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) has expanded their search area for the missing flight into the Indian OceanThe Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) has expanded their search area for the missing flight into the Indian Ocean
Hope: A message of support is displayed at Kuala Lumpur International AirportHope: A message of support is displayed at Kuala Lumpur International Airport

While he thought nothing of it at the time, when he learned about the missing aircraft MH370 the following day he lodged a report with police.
Mr Alif's account tended to coincide with that of fisherman Mr Azid who told the New Straits Times: 'Usually, lights from an airplane look like distant stars at night but the one that I saw was big, as the aircraft was flying below the clouds.
'I followed the light for about five minutes before it disappeared.'
A Royal Australia Air Force pilot in an AP-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft scans the surface of the sea during a search operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 to the west of Peninsula MalaysiaA Royal Australia Air Force pilot in an AP-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft scans the surface of the sea during a search operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 to the west of Peninsula Malaysia
Investigators probing the disappearance of the plane believe it most likely flew into the southern Indian Ocean, a source close to the investigation said today.
An unprecedented search for the Boeing 777-200ER is under way involving 26 nations in two vast search 'corridors', one arcing north overland from Laos towards the Caspian Sea, the other curving south across the Indian Ocean from west of Indonesia to west of Australia.

'The working assumption is that it went south, and furthermore that it went to the southern end of that corridor,' said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The view is based on the lack of any evidence from countries along the northern corridor that the plane crossed their airspace, and the failure to find any trace of wreckage in searches in the upper part of the southern corridor.
Read more: Malaysia Airlines MH370 / TomNod crowd-search


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...z2wvw0PQr2
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#10
Quote:Where's the Other n u k e?

[Image: Jungle-Adventure-1.jpg]

Weather experts baffled by mystery plume on New Mexico radar near 1945 nuclear bomb test site

There is speculation that the cloud could be the result of a weapons test
But the U.S. has not done A-bomb tests since the Test Ban Treaty in 1992
Plume originated from White Sands Missile Range in Socorro county



By Daily Mail Reporter

PUBLISHED: 16:57 GMT, 19 March 2014  | UPDATED: 18:46 GMT, 19 March 2014 


Quote:A mystery 'storm cloud' caught on weather radar after erupting off a U.S. military missile testing ground in New Mexico has left weather experts baffled.

Conspiracy theorists have speculated that the plume-like cloud, which seems to appear out of nowhere, could have been kicked up by the explosion from an unreported weapons test.

Deepening the mystery, U.S. National Weather Service offices in Albuquerque and El Paso have confirmed the reading, but say they have no idea where it could have come from.




 




The mysterious plume as it appeared on the radar at Plymouth State Weather Centre as it headed toward Cannon Air Force Base. Weather experts are baffled about where it could have come from

[Image: plume.gif]
The mysterious plume as it appeared on the radar at Plymouth State Weather Centre as it headed toward Cannon Air Force Base. Weather experts are baffled about where it could have come from




The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border

+4
The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border


The plume first appeared at sunset on Monday evening over the part of the vast White Sands Missile Range in east Socorro county, close to the 'Trinity Site' where the first atomic bomb was detonated in 1945.

It was spotted in publicly accessible radar data by a blogger, who tracked its progress and has published his findings in two YouTube videos and a blog post.




More...
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Edward Snowden makes bizarre appearance at TED talk as a robot on a TV screen as he claims governments want him dead
Cannibal killing finally revealed: The gruesome details of how Rockefeller heir was gutted and cooked by the Asmat tribe of New Guinea


He showed how the Weather Channel's storm identification system had detected the plume as a strong storm cell which seemingly emerged out of nowhere on a clear night.

A second view of the plume, on the College of DuPage's NeXt Generation Weather Lab service, showed how it appeared to burst out of a small point, like the aftermath of a massive explosion.

The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border, where it appeared to dissipate.

 




Conspiracy theorists baffled by plume near nuclear bomb site






 




The moment conspiracy theorists first noticed the mystery cloud






A closer look at the whereabouts of the beginning of the apparent weather event showed that it emerged from the White Sands Missile Range, a site which extends to some 3,200 sq/miles across New Mexico that is used as a proving ground for the U.S. military's ballistic missiles.

In its previous incarnation as the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range, the site played host to the 'Trinity' test of the world's first atomic bomb on July 16, 1945.

In that test scientists from the Manhattan Project exploded a 20 kiloton plutonium bomb of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, killing 40,000 people instantly.

There is as yet no evidence of a nuclear explosion. The U.S. has not officially tested any atomic weapons since signing the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in 1992.



The Trinity Site, where the world's first atomic bomb was detonated in July 1945, which is close to the source of the unexplained plume on the White Sands Missile Range

[Image: article-2584235-1C6BB63A00000578-96_634x633.jpg]
The Trinity Site, where the world's first atomic bomb was detonated in July 1945, which is close to the source of the unexplained plume on the White Sands Missile Range




The Trinity test explosion pictured 0.016 seconds after detonation. The 20 kiloton plutonium bomb was of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki

[Image: article-2584235-1C69780400000578-151_634x386.jpg]
The Trinity test explosion pictured 0.016 seconds after detonation. The 20 kiloton plutonium bomb was of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki


Nevertheless the bizarre 'weather' event's appearance over a military site has led to speculation that some kind of massive weapon has been exploded at white sands, propelling a huge amount of particulate debris into the atmosphere.

With the Carrizozo volcanic field just east of the site, another possible explanation could that a volcanic eruption - which has gone unreported for whatever reason - could be the source of the plume.

There have been been no eyewitness reports or photographs of the plume, and no official statements from agencies involved in either missile testing or geology.


Weather experts told KOB Eyewitness News 4 that they have no idea what it could be. So, whatever the source of the reading, the consensus appears to be that it was not weather related.



Read more: LARGE EXPLOSION AT NEW MEXICO BASE SENDS PLUME TOWARDS AMARILLO, TX | Dutchsinse
Strange plume appears on local radar | KOB Eyewitness News 4


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...z2ww1DsIkI

[Image: aviewfromabo.jpg]
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Reply
#11
Where's the luggage?
Where's the little girl's doll?
The little boy's baseball cap?
Mommy?
Daddy?


[Image: MysteryofMH370new1003.ashx]


A Styrofoam cup???  Dunno




Data not debris shows Malaysia plane crashed into sea

Updated 14:26 25 March 2014 by Paul Marks


Quote:Update 25/03/2014: Since this story was published on 24/03/2014, more information about how Inmarsat calculated the flight's path has emerged.The article has been changed to reflect this.

The Boeing 777 airliner that has been missing for more than two weeks crashed into the southern Indian Ocean, killing all 239 passengers and crew, according to a fresh analysis of the satellite data broadcast by the stricken Malaysia Airlines plane.

The news that relatives had dreaded came in an announcement by Malaysia's prime minister Najib Razak, who said an analysis by the UK's Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) and the London-based satellite services provider Inmarsat was of a type never before performed on air incident data. But he is confident in its conclusions.

"It is therefore with deep sadness and regret that I must inform you that, according to this new data, flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean, west of Perth. This is a remote location far from any landing sites," Razak said.

In a message to relatives, Malaysia Airlines said: "We have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and none of those on board survived."

Vanished from radar

The plane took off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing on 8 March. Less than an hour later, its radar transponder was disabled as it headed out over the South China Sea towards Vietnam, and the plane disappeared from radar. Its flight path after that was unclear and search efforts were launched in the South China Sea and Indian Ocean, where land-based radar had suggested it may have headed.

Many types of aircraft transmit technical data about things like engine health to the airline. Although, in this case, the airline did not subscribe to an Inmarsat service offering satellite transmission of that data, the Boeing 777 had an Inmarsat satellite transceiver fitted that still pinged an hourly data-free signal to an Inmarsat satellite.

On 15 March those signals were used to calculate how far the plane was from a geostationary satellite above the Indian Ocean. That led to the calculation that the plane was flying in either a broad northern corridor towards Kazakhstan, or a southern one headed deep into the open reaches of the Indian Ocean.

Satellite sighting

None of the nations on the northern track spotted the plane on radar, so most search efforts this week were concentrated on the empty southern corridor. And in recent days French, Australian and Chinese satellites spotted potential aircraft debris on the ocean surface. Today, both Chinese and Australian aircraft spotted debris on the ocean surface, too. None has yet been identified as being aircraft-related, however.

It is now clear that Inmarsat believed other details hidden in the pinged signal gave away the plane's flight path – and its probable crash point – rather than merely its distance either side of the geostationary satellite. But to calculate that path it needed a methodology not used in aircraft tracking before, one that had to be peer reviewed for accuracy by a so-far unnamed rival satellite company, as well as by Boeing.

The method uses the physics of the Doppler effect. It is this effect that makes an ambulance siren go up in pitch as it approaches you and then lower as it passes and travels away. The same happens to radio waves as they are compressed and expanded by a moving source. It meant that the recorded frequency of the jet's pings changed as it approached or moved away from the geostationary satellite. After comparing these changes with those from previous 777 flights in the region, Inmarsat is now certain the plane took the southerly route and flew at steady altitude until it ran out of fuel 2000 kilometres west of Perth, Australia.

"Previous flights gave us the pattern and that pattern – flying to the south – is virtually what we got. It is a very good fit," Chris Mclaughlin, vice-president of Inmarsat, told Sky News.

Patient approach

Meanwhile, the US Navy is readying for an underwater search. It is sending a ship-towed device to its fleet in the Indian Ocean – one that can listen out for the ultrasonic signal from the downed aircraft's flight recorders. Called the Towed Pinger Locator System the device can detect signals through 6000 metres of seawater – the Indian Ocean averages 4000 metres deep. But the cockpit voice and flight data recorders only have enough battery to broadcast a signal for 30 days after immersion, so time is getting tight.

In addition, it is not always easy to find deeply submerged devices, says John Powis, a former commanding officer of the British navy submarines HMS Unseen, HMS Resolution and HMS Victorious. "The range at which a ping can be heard depends on many environmental factors like background noise, changes of water density that cause ping refraction and shielding by seabed features including the wreckage itself," he warns.

"Now it is confirmed that the aircraft went down in the ocean, a painstaking and patient approach is needed to try to establish the cause of this tragic incident," says Jim McAuslan, general secretary of the British Airline Pilots Association.

"This approach will take time but lead to the detailed facts, which will enable pilots to push for any improvements to make every single flight a safe one and stop this type of event happening in future," he says.



http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25...zII9xRzZ1t




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#12
Data not debris shows Malaysia plane crashed into sea

Then, as one year’s transient beauty is cut down, Nakayama and other Inakadate Village officials will begin turning their minds to next year’s artistic crop — and to hosting seminars at the request of other farming communities around Japan on the practical details of creating rice-paddy art.



So what form of art will grow in their rice paddies next year?

“Well, I don’t know yet,” Nakayama says. “But one thing’s for sure: we have more ambitious plans for our rice-paddy art every year.”


[Image: 13416463524_27ea8a8aa7_o_d.gif]


[move] Dunnomaybe we'll never know... Dunno[/move]





[flash=140,105]http://www.youtube.com/v/XAJKgqezNMc?[/flash]

Whistle  :Abomb:


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#13
Devil What The Hell? Devil
Dunno Dunno Dunno

[Image: mh370-possible-positions.jpg]

Damned  Diego Garcia???  Damned

[Image: China-SLOCs.jpg]

Oh yeah... Happy belated SssAin't rice paddie's  Hmm2
(Howz My Spelling? Linke?)    Dunno Dunno Dunno     


Backdated: March 17,2014

[flash=720,960]http://www.youtube.com/v/yfsYIdqvhg4?version=3[/flash]



data  Naughty  not  Naughty  debris in the MIDDLE of the Indian Ocean...




Ping that one with Doppler. Hmm2 Hmm2 Hmm2

Or...

It can Ping SIMULATING Doppler  Smoke


Letz Rollz Royce
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#14
A Doppelganger in a Hangar??? Dunno

[flash=560,315]http://www.youtube.com/v/wWYANJzVJvY?[/flash]

ANU c l e a r  sin spin twin  Hmm2
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#15
Of course 19.5
[Image: coneofsilence.jpg]
Off course mh370


Quote: The NEXRAD antenna cannot point higher than 19.5 degrees above the horizon, so there is a volume above the radar that never gets scanned, called the "cone of silence."

but the light he saw in the early hours of Saturday vanished from view behind a line of coconut trees.


All Eye saw was a Queen a Ten and two Eights.

[Image: 52-card-pick-up.jpg]

It all depends how your radar screen attenuates. Dunno


[Image: vcp11.gif]





[Image: darwin-shh.jpg]
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#16
Diego Garcia needs the world's affection.

If you don't feel for these victims... fake it.


half full  Dunno half empty


More Wine?

[flash=840,630]http://www.youtube.com/v/Nd9gfPnW8o4?[/flash] 
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#17
[Image: 10171301_10202093780771671_1699733622_n....e=53993EB4]

Dance2
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#18
Quote:Of course 19.5
[Image: coneofsilence.jpg]
Off course mh370



[Image: najib-mh370-obama.jpg]
Najib Razak says nothing was done to identify or intercept aircraft because link was not known at the time

Adam Withnall  Sunday 27 April 2014


[flash=640,360]http://www.youtube.com/v/Lf2db4hD6zI?[/flash]

[Image: 13416463524_27ea8a8aa7_o_d.gif]
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#19
Dunno Where's the  n  u  k  e  ?  Hmm2

[Image: plume.gif]
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#20
Malaysia Airlines flight MH370: Air search called off as new area of focus on ocean floor announced

Kashmira Gander,Kathy Marks. Monday 28 April 2014

[move]Abbott also acknowledged it was possible that no debris from the plane would ever be found.[/move]

[Image: australia.jpg]
Prime Minister Tony Abbott's announcement comes as the aerial search comes to an end

Quote:The search area for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 will be expanded to include a large new part of the ocean floor, in an operation that may take eight months to complete, Australia’s Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced on Monday.

For over two weeks, a US Navy Bluefin 21 submarine has been scouring the remote Indian Ocean search area off Australia’s west coast for weeks, but the whereabouts of the aircraft remain unknown since it veered off course on 8 March.

The unmanned submarine has created a 3D sonar map of the ocean floor near where signals consistent with aeroplane black boxes were heard on 8 April.

Meanwhile, the six-week-long aerial search for the plane will officially end on Monday, the search coordination centre confirmed, and the team will introduce new equipment that can analyse a larger patch of the seabed for the plane and its missing 239 passengers and crew.

Mr Abbott told reporters on Monday: “It is highly unlikely at this stage that we will find any aircraft debris on the ocean surface. By this stage, 52 days into the search, most material would have become waterlogged and sunk.

“Therefore, we are moving from the current phase to a phase which is focused on searching the ocean floor over a much larger area.”

Since the focus of the hunt switched to the Indian Ocean 41 days ago, search teams have trawled more than 4.5 million square kilometres of ocean, with 10 civil aircraft , 19 military planes and 14 ships carrying out visual searches for debris bobbing on the ocean surface.

The next stage of the search – already the most expensive in aviation history – will cost at least A$60m (£33m) and could take six to eight months. But Mr Abbott pledged that Australia would “do everything we humanly can, everything we reasonably can, to solve this mystery”.

Crews will now begin searching the plane's entire probable impact zone, an area 430 miles long and 50 miles wide, Mr Abbott said.

But Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, the head of the search effort, cautioned that the search will take time.

"If everything goes perfectly, I would say we'll be doing well if we do it in eight months,"Houston said, adding that weather and technical issues could prolong the search well beyond that estimate.

Officials will now look to recruit private companies to supply additional sonar mapping equipment that can be towed behind boats, to search the expanded area at an estimated cost of $60million.

As it make take several weeks to organise the contracts, the Bluefin will continue to search the seabed in the meantime, Mr Abbott said.

While each country involved in the search has so far been bearing its own costs, Mr Abbott said Australia would now seek contributions from other countries to help pay for the new equipment.

Read more: • Cyclone halts MH370 search
• Grieving families to start lawsuits

Two weeks after Mr Abbott said officials were “very confident” that a series of underwater ‘pings’ were from the flight’s black-boxes, he admitted: “We're still baffled and disappointed that we haven't been able to find undersea wreckage based on those detections, and this is one of the reasons why we are continuing to deploy the Bluefin 21 submersible — because this is the best information that we've got."

“It may turn out to be a false lead, but nevertheless it's the best lead we've got," he added.

Abbott also acknowledged it was possible that no debris from the plane would ever be found.

[Image: _74275286_ocean_depths_624_14_04_14.jpg]

“Of course it's possible, but that would be a terrible outcome because it would leave families with a baffling uncertainty forever,” he said.

"The aircraft plainly cannot disappear — it must be somewhere — and we are going to do everything we reasonably can, even to the point of conducting the most intensive undersea search which human ingenuity currently makes possible of some 60,000 square kilometers under the sea.”

“We are going to do all these things because we do not want this crippling cloud of uncertainty to hang over these families and the wider traveling public,” he said.

Additional reporting by AP

[move]A Styrofoam cup???  Dunno [/move]



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#21
[Image: 7778433.jpg]

Holy Minnie mouse and mickey mantle!

[Image: autographed-mickey-mantle-new-york-yanke...ll-cap.jpg]

Missing flight MH370: Relatives told to return home




1 May 2014 Last updated at 11:10 ET

Where's the luggage?
Where's the little girl's doll?
The little boy's baseball cap?
Mommy?
Daddy?







[Image: _74575152_74575151.jpg]
Nurlaila Binti Ngah, wife of chief steward Wan Swaid Wan Ismail: "We just wanted our husbands back"

A Styrofoam cup???  Dunno

Quote:Malaysia Airlines has asked relatives of passengers on board flight MH370 to leave the hotel accommodation it is providing and return to their homes.

It is closing the family assistance centres set up after the plane vanished on 8 March with 239 people on board.

The airline promised to keep relatives up to date on the search operation.

Meanwhile, a report by Malaysia's transport ministry has recommended the introduction of real-time tracking of commercial air transport.

The ministry's air accident investigation bureau said there had now been two occasions over the past five years when large passenger planes had gone missing and their last position was not accurately known - MH370 and Air France Flight 447 in 2009.

"This uncertainty resulted in significant difficulty in locating the aircraft in a timely manner," the report noted.

[Image: _73712466_73712465.jpg]

Flight MH370: Audio recording reveals final cockpit communications

There is no requirement from the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), the UN body that oversees global aviation, for real-time tracking.

Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein also released for the first time the recordings of conversations between MH370's pilots and air traffic controllers. A transcript was published earlier this month.

The plane's cargo manifest and seating plan was also published by Mr Hussein, along with a summary of events from the disappearance of the plane's radar blip until activation of the Rescue Co-ordination Centre.

'Prolonged process'

MH370 disappeared while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

The search initially took place in the South China Sea and the Malacca Straits, but moved to the southern Indian Ocean after about three weeks when satellite data was reanalysed.

No wreckage from the plane has been found, and an aerial search of the ocean 1,670km (1,040 miles) north-west of the Australian city of Perth ended on Monday.

An unmanned submarine is continuing to search a 314-sq km (121-sq mile) area of the ocean floor where acoustic signals consistent with a plane's flight recorder were detected earlier this month.

[Image: _74275286_ocean_depths_624_14_04_14.jpg]
Ocean off the coast of Australia
[Image: _74582054_74582049.jpg]
Relatives of Chinese passengers who were on board Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 cry outside the Malaysian embassy in Beijing (25 April 2014) The families have been critical of the initial search process and the way they have been kept informed

[Image: _74583908_5879f433-1d87-4eab-b384-46814ccadb7c.jpg]
Chinese Maritime Safety Administration (MSA) vessel Hai Xin 01 is seen from a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P-3K2 Orion aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean (13 April 2014) The Australian head of the search operation has said it could take as long as a year



On Thursday, Malaysia Airlines said in a statement: "Despite such an intensified search operation, probably the largest one in human history, we have to face the hard reality that there is still no trace of the aircraft, and the fate of the missing passengers and crew remains unknown.

"Malaysia Airlines is acutely conscious of, and deeply sympathetic to the continuing unimaginable anguish, distress and hardship suffered by those with loved ones on board the flight."

But it warned that the continuing search and investigation would probably be a "prolonged process" and that it would be "adjusting the mode of services and support" for the relatives.

"Instead of staying in hotels, the families of MH370 are advised to receive information updates on the progress of the search and investigation and other support by Malaysia Airlines within the comfort of their own homes, with the support and care of their families and friends."

All family assistance centres would be closed on 7 May, but the relatives would be given news updates through telephone calls, messages, the internet and face-to-face meetings, Malaysia Airlines said.

Centres will be established in the capitals of Malaysia and China, where most of those on board MH370 were from, to provide "follow-up support and services".

The families have been critical of the initial search process and the way they have been kept informed.

Many have told the BBC that they believe Malaysian officials know more than they are revealing.

Last week, 10 Malaysia Airlines staff were reportedly held against their will for more than 10 hours at a hotel in Beijing by angry relatives.

Malaysia Airlines also said it would soon make "advanced compensation payments" to their nominated next-of-kin, "in order to meet their immediate economic needs". The payments would not affect their rights to claim further compensation at a later stage, it added.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-27242522 

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Show's over.
You can all go home nowBump Bump Bump

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#22
“What do I think of this new twist? I think it is consistent with the tangled mass that is this supposed investigation,” Sarah Bajc, whose partner Philip Wood was on MH370, wrote in an email.

[Image: 52-card-pick-up.jpg]

“It is a sad commentary on the situation that family members are rejoicing that there is still a chance that our loved ones are being held hostage by hijackers. It is a better option than dead at the bottom of the ocean.”

[Image: coneofsilence.jpg]




MH370: Australia rules out main search zone  Bricks


Government announces plane is not in part of Indian Ocean where searchers previously reported 'pings' from black box


Michael Safi in Sydney and Tania Branigan in Beijing
The Guardian, Thursday 29 May 2014 07.50 BST


The Australian government says pings in the Indian Ocean that it believed were from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 were not from the aircraft's black box recorder

Quote:The missing Malaysia Airlines plane is not in the Indian Ocean search zone where underwater “pings” were detected, the Australian search authorities have announced, after a US navy officer cast doubt on whether the signals were from a plane's black box flight recorder.


On a day of dramatic developments, the Australian Transport Safety Buereau (ATSB) said it had finished searching the area and declared that it “can now be discounted as the final resting place of MH370”.


An underwater search vehicle, Bluefin-21, has scoured more than 850 square kilometres of the Indian ocean west of Perth since four acoustic signals – thought to have been emitted by the missing aircraft’s black box flight recorders – were detected by a towed pinger locator in April.


But the search has failed to turn up any sign of the plane, which went missing on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to beijing on 8 March with 239 people on board.

“The joint agency co-ordination centre can advise that no signs of aircraft debris have been found by the autonomous underwater vehicle since it joined the search effort,” search authorities said.


“The search in the vicinity of the acoustic detections can now be considered complete and, in its professional judgment, the area can now be discounted as the final resting place of MH370.”


Australia's deputy prime minister, Warren Truss, told parliament in Canberra on Thursday that the search would move into a new phase beginning in August that could take 12 months.

"The pings were the best information available at the time and that is all you can do," he said.

"We are still very confident that the resting place of the aircraft is in the southern [Indian] Ocean and along the seventh ping line," he added, refering to an arc identified by analysis of satellite communications data from UK company Inmarsat. The search area would now be extended to a 60,000sq km zone along the arc. The ocean floor would be mapped to help the search.

The team was "still confident" that the plane would be found and were "determined" to do so, he said.

The statements came after claims by a senior US navy officer earlier in the day that the four acoustic signals may have been produced by the search vessel and wrongly identified as black box signals.


“Our best theory at this point is that [the pings were] likely some sound produced by the ship [the Ocean Shield] ... or within the electronics of the towed pinger locator,” the US navy’s deputy director of ocean engineering, Michael Dean, told CNN.


The US navy said later that Dean’s comments had been “speculative and premature” but the statement by Australian search authorities did not address these new doubts.

The ATSB said the next stage of the search would be to map the ocean floor near where the plane is thought to have crashed, a process which a Chinese ship, the Zhu Kezhen, has begun. The mapping is expected to take three months.


A private contractor is expected to begin an exhaustive 12-month search of the mapped area in August.


At the time the signals were picked up, the Australian prime minister, Tony Abbott, said he was “confident that we know the position of the black box flight recorder to within some kilometres”.


The flight, which went missing shortly after leaving Kuala Lumpur on 8 March, has been the subject of an unprecedented multinational search effort. It was destined for Beijing but investigators say it was diverted from the flight path deliberately.

The latest announcement has fuelled the suspicions of friends and relatives who refuse to believe that the flight can simply have disappeared and insist that passengers may still be alive.

“What do I think of this new twist? I think it is consistent with the tangled mass that is this supposed investigation,” Sarah Bajc, whose partner Philip Wood was on MH370, wrote in an email.

“It is a sad commentary on the situation that family members are rejoicing that there is still a chance that our loved ones are being held hostage by hijackers. It is a better option than dead at the bottom of the ocean.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/ma...rities-say 
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#23
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#24
French ex-airline boss claims cover-up on MH370

France 24  4 hrs ago

[Image: BBgXYjk.img?h=351&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=775&y=290]

Quote:Former airline boss and famous French author Marc Dugain argued Thursday that there had been a cover-up in the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, speculating that the passenger jet could have been hacked and then shot down by the US.

Dugain, a well-respected French author, argues that the Boeing 777 carrying 239 people crashed near Diego Garcia, a British island in the middle of the Indian Ocean used as a strategic air force and intelligence base by the US military, in the six-page article in Paris Match.

The US has always officially denied that flight MH370 came anywhere near Diego Garcia.

The latest theory into the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 on March 9, 2014 has all the ingredients of a spy thriller and has grabbed the French public’s attention.

The former boss of Proteus Airlines travelled to the neighbouring Maldives where residents told local media on March 9th that they had seen an airliner fly in the direction of Diego Garcia. Their claims were promptly dismissed by the authorities.

“I saw a huge plane fly over us at low altitude,” a fisherman on Kudahuvadhoo island told Dugain. “I saw red and blue stripes on a white background” – the colours of Malaysia Airlines. Other witnesses confirmed the sighting.

Fire on board?

Dugain speculates – adding to the numerous other existing hypotheses about what happened to flight MH370 – that a modern aircraft such as Malaysia Airlines' Boeing 777 could have been hijacked by a hacker.

“In 2006, Boeing patented a remote control system using a computer placed inside or outside the aircraft,” he noted. This technology lead Dugain to the idea of a “soft” remote hijacking.

But the writer also suggests that a fire could have led the crew to deactivate electrical devices, including transmission systems.

Whatever the initial reasons for leaving its flight path, Dugain suspects that the plane then headed to Diego Garcia, where a number of scenarios may have played out – including the US Air Force shooting it down for fear of a September 11-style attack.

Dugain met the mayor of neighbouring Baarah island, who showed him pictures of a strange device found on a beach two weeks after the plane had disappeared and before the Maldives military seized it. Two aviation experts and a local military officer concluded that the object was a Boeing fire extinguisher. Dugain points out that for the extinguisher to have floated, it must have been empty, having been automatically triggered by a fire. He adds that precedent exists in which fires on board aircraft caused all passengers and crew to die of asphyxiation, while the plane’s automated systems extinguished the blaze and kept it in the air.

Cover-up

The rest of his article draws more conclusions from the information that has remained buried than from new facts.

The writer notes that the search operation in the southern Indian Ocean was based on satellite data from UK-based Inmarsat – the last organisation to receive a signal from the airliner – which is "very close to intelligence agencies".

For Dugain, the suppression of testimonies from the Maldives, the unlikely event that Diego Garcia’s US intelligence officers “equipped with the best technology in the world may have ‘lost’ a 63-metre-long object”, and the secrecy surrounding the cargo in the plane’s hold all point towards a large-scale cover-up.

So does the friendly advice of a “Western intelligence officer” – a British one, Dugain said in a radio interview on Thursday – who cautioned him against the “risks” of investigating the flight’s disappearance and suggested that he “let time do its work” instead.
[Image: coneofsilence.jpg]
The writer’s conclusion is that “the only firm belief left from this investigation is that someone knows”.http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/fren...?ocid=iehp

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#25
Quote:For Dugain, the suppression of testimonies from the Maldives, the unlikely event that Diego Garcia’s US intelligence officers “equipped with the best technology in the world may have ‘lost’ a 63-metre-long object”, and the secrecy surrounding the cargo in the plane’s hold all point towards a large-scale cover-up.

Yep. And if you look on a map, there is no reason for an airliner in trouble to head out into 'empty ocean' when there is ample landmass nearby to scout for setdown points. The only logical reason for the airliner to be seen in the Maldives is that it is heading for Diego Garcia...

Quote:Dugain met the mayor of neighbouring Baarah island, who showed him pictures of a strange device found on a beach two weeks after the plane had disappeared and before the Maldives military seized it. Two aviation experts and a local military officer concluded that the object was a Boeing fire extinguisher.

Yep, and they 'found' an unburnt Passport of one of the hijackers just lying on the street below the Tower wreckage in NYC. Two weeks was plenty of time to lay a plausible 'backtrail' if the original Maldives eyewitness-testimony went viral...
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#26
(03-23-2014, 01:06 AM)EA link Wrote:Runway?   Dunno
Oops  I mean. Hmm2
Landing Strip?
  Dunno

[flash=420,315]http://www.youtube.com/v/XAJKgqezNMc?[/flash]

Notice how the thread title is constructed to confuse the syntax of any machine learning bots so we can fly under the radar and discuss this without Homies landsec yer it! y snupes.
Abstract Thread headers stay off of google.
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#27
[quote='EA link' dateline='1398656587']
[quote]Of course 19.5

Off course mh370
[/quote]

[move]US intelligence officers “equipped with the best technology in the world may have ‘lost’ a 63-metre-long object”,[/move]


[Image: najib-mh370-obama.jpg]
Najib Razak says nothing was done to identify or intercept aircraft because link was not known at the time

Adam Withnall  Sunday 27 April 2014


[flash=640,360]http://www.youtube.com/v/Lf2db4hD6zI?[/flash]

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#28
There was more than one Genius aboard mh370.
So Smart that they can be invisible to r a d a r and also fly by wire gamers using an ultra cool jame's bond app.

[flash=888,666]https://www.youtube.com/v/zryqLR-nqxw[/flash]

Child's play to the see eye eh? Hmm2
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#29
Where's the luggage?
Where's the little girl's doll?
The little boy's baseball cap?
Mommy?
Daddy?



No plane, many discoveries in yearlong search for Flight 370

15 hours ago by By Nick Perry
   
[Image: noplanemanyd.jpg]
In this April 13, 2014 file photo, taken from the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P-3K2-Orion aircraft, co-pilot Squadron Leader Brett McKenzie looks out of a window while searching for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, over the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia. The yearlong search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has turned up no sign of the plane, but that doesn't mean it's been unproductive. It has yielded lessons and discoveries that could benefit millions, including coastal Australians, air and sea travelers and scientists trying to understand ancient changes to the earth's crust. (AP Photo/Greg Wood, Pool, File)

Quote:AP)—The yearlong search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has turned up no sign of the plane, but that doesn't mean it's been unproductive. It has yielded lessons and discoveries that could benefit millions, including coastal Australians, air and sea travelers and scientists trying to understand ancient changes to the earth's crust.

The knowledge gained so far is of little comfort to family and friends of the 239 people still missing from the plane, which vanished last March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing. While finding the plane remains the top priority for searchers and investigators, what they're learning along the way may prove valuable long after the search ends.

Benefits of the work so far include:

NEW UNDERWATER MAPS

In the Indian Ocean west of Australia, where experts believe the plane crashed, scientists have been mapping the sea floor to aid in the search for wreckage.

Previous maps relied on satellite data, which gave only rough estimates of the ocean's depth. Now, using sonar readings from ships, scientists have mapped an area the size of Nebraska and have discovered previously unknown trenches and underwater mountains that rival the height of any on Australia's surface.

Searchers are getting even more detailed sonar readings using small underwater vehicles called "towfish" that are towed just above the sea floor.

Scientists from around the world are eagerly anticipating the release of the three-dimensional maps and data once the search is completed.

BETTER TSUNAMI PREDICTION

Stuart Minchin, a divisional chief at Geoscience Australia, said that when the maps are released and further analyzed, they will give scientists a better understanding of areas that during earthquakes are susceptible to underwater landslides, which can create or exacerbate tsunamis.

He said the information will help scientists pinpoint areas along Australia's west coast that are particularly vulnerable to tsunamis and enable better warnings and predictions for coastal residents.

IMPROVED SEARCH AND RESCUE

Knowing the topography of the ocean floor also helps scientists predict ocean currents, said Minchin. That can help with everything from predicting where a disabled boat might drift in a search-and-rescue mission to understanding how marine species spread to new areas.

He said it can even help scientists understand how heat is distributed through the ocean, which could be used by meteorologists to help fine-tune weather forecasts.

BETTER PLANE TRACKING

One thing the airline industry learned from Flight 370 is that more tracking is needed, even for planes expected to fly over land for their entire journeys.

The International Civil Aviation Organization, which is part of the United Nations, has proposed that airlines be required to get position updates from each of their planes every 15 minutes. That requirement is expected to be in place by November 2016.

A more stringent requirement would seek updates every minute if a fire is detected or the plane makes an unusual move, such as suddenly dropping or climbing in elevation. That would apply only to jets manufactured after 2020.

Australian Transport Minister Warren Truss said Sunday that his government's airspace agency will work with Malaysia and Indonesia to test a new method, which would enable planes to be tracked every 15 minutes, rather than the previous rate of 30 to 40 minutes. However, even if such a system had been in place for Flight 370, it would not have made it possible to track the plane because transponder and other equipment were switched off.

Because investigators still don't know what happened to Flight 370, airlines have no information to help them update their mechanical systems or flight-training techniques.

IMPROVED MULTINATIONAL SEARCHES

Capt. Chris Budde, maritime operations director for the U.S. Navy 7th Fleet, said that when it helped out on a multinational search for another missing plane in December, things went more smoothly thanks to lessons learned from the hunt for Flight 370.

The latter search was for AirAsia Flight 8501, which plunged into the Java Sea near Indonesia, killing all 162 people aboard.

Budde said tasks like establishing common radio frequencies between nations and determining who to contact onshore for search assignments were completed more efficiently after Indonesia studied and learned from Malaysia's experience.

"These events are tragic, but they do help build cooperation and regional stability as militaries work together," he said.

He said the U.S. Navy fleet also managed to modify its technology on the fly in the search for Flight 370, by tweaking its sonar equipment to detect, at short range, pings from an airplane's black boxes. It was able to use that tweak a second time in the search for the AirAsia plane, he said, albeit without success in either instance.

POSSIBLE SATELLITE IMPROVEMENTS

The search exposed some of the limitations of satellite images, said Joseph Bermudez Jr., the co-founder of Longmont, Colo.-based AllSource Analysis. Over the long term, he said, it may prompt companies to improve the technical capabilities of their satellites—for instance, by having them detect different and enhanced light wavelengths.

Many people assumed that, like in the movies, they could scour satellite images to see the plane veering off course or spot its wreckage. In reality, Bermudez said, commercial satellites aren't generally aimed to take images over remote stretches of ocean and when they do, the images are often unclear and need experts to decipher them.

He said there was such high interest in the plane's disappearance that amateurs around the world studied satellite images on crowd-sourcing websites to identify between 2 million and 3 million possible sightings of the plane or its debris.

"Not one of them was correct," he said. He added that people need to be better trained in reading such images before they are turned loose on the task. Improved image quality, he added, could also help.

A WINDOW INTO HISTORY

Robin Beaman, a marine geologist at Australia's James Cook University, said the underwater maps will help show scientists how Earth's crust stretched and pulled apart millions of years ago, a process that is continuing today and is slowly pushing Australia away from Antarctica.

"It's fitting the pieces of the puzzle back together. And it's not just an academic exercise," Beaman said. "The great gas resources for Australia are in the west, and if you fit that jigsaw back, you get more of a picture of how those gas resources were created."

Dave Gallo, the director of special projects at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, said less than 8 percent of the underwater world has been explored.

"It's more daunting than looking on Mars because there's no light," he said. "So we're in a completely unknown world in mountains that are the most rugged on earth. There's no maps, so it's all basic, pure exploration with a mission that not only are we exploring, but we're also looking for an aircraft."

Minchin said that everybody involved in the search continues to hope the plane will be found.

"If not, there is a silver lining," he said. "The data will be useful to science for many years to come."

Explore further: MH370: Seabed images to support inch-by-inch plane search
http://phys.org/news/2015-03-plane-disco...t.html#jCp
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#30
phys.org/news:
Quote:However, even if such a system had been in place for Flight 370, it would not have made it possible to track the plane because transponder and other equipment were switched off.

Good article, but the above is a lie or at best a half-truth. They are combining two systems into one. There is, and has been since the Battle of Britain, a system of radio transmitters that bounces signals off of airframes and back to receivers: "Skin paint" radar. Entirely independent of the aircraft. Malaysian military used it to track MH370, even when the second system was turned off. The second system, a transponder, is an 'addition' to the data, and originates at the aircraft. It used for the convenience of air traffic controllers and includes aircraft 'designation', etc. It does not effect "skin paint" radar at all.

Just another controlled-media way to discredit the Malaysian military ("skin paint") radar return, which showed MH370 doing a near 180[sup]o[/sup] and heading roughly southwest. (Which, curiously, happens to be the direction to Diego Garcia...)
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#31

Remote islanders saw 'low-flying jumbo jet' on the day MH370 disappeared

Sophie McIntyre

17 hrs ago


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Quote:Remote islanders saw 'low-flying jumbo jet' on the day MH370 disappeared© Independent Remote islanders saw 'low-flying jumbo jet' on the day MH370 disappeared  Inhabitants of a remote island in the Indian Ocean sighted a low flying passenger jet on the morning the MH370 plane dropped out of sight.

Over a year after the Malaysia Airlines MH370 disappeared with 239 people on board on the 8 March 2014, residents of the island of Kudahuvadhoo, in the Maldives, have reported seeing a plane with red and blue markings similar to those of the lost aircraft.

Villagers from the 3500-strong community, in the Southern area of the Dhaalu Atoll in the Indian Ocean, also heard a loud noise as the plane flew low over head, according to a local news source.

  “I've never seen a jet flying so low over our island before.

"We've seen seaplanes, but I'm sure that this was not one of those.

"I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly,” said one villager. Passenger aircraft crashes in last twelve months

Several residents reported seeing exactly the same thing.

"I'm very sure of what I saw on a very clear and bright day, and what I saw was not normal- the plane was very big, and low.

"I did not know until later that other people saw it too.

"I don't know if it's the Malaysia plane', said 34  year-old IT manager, Ahmed Shiyaam.

Whilst Abdu Rasheed Ibrahim said: "I didn't know that a plane was missing.

"I went straight home and told my wife about it.

"I told my family, "I saw this strange plane".

"This is the biggest plane I have ever seen from this island...I have seen pictures of the missing plane- I believe I saw the plane...I strongly felt those people who were searching should come here."

Witnesses have also suggested that the plane was travelling north to south-east, towards the southern tip of the Maldives, when it was sighted.

The islanders claims are not in line with recent approximations as to where the MH370 plane went down.

Calculations based on satellite connections currently suggest that the plane crashed within a 180km arc southwest of Perth.

However, acoustic scientists have suggested that a high energy sound measured around the time the plane was thought to have crashed, could place the aircraft's final destination as near to the Maldives.

[Image: kuda-huvadhoo.jpg?itok=UfG5T6gd]
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#32
Interesting, the first time I've seen a loud bang mentioned. Also the only one year anniversary report that mentions the Maldives sighting. These acoustic engineers are the first experts I've seen comment on it.
A crash would fit with MH370 having been low on fuel by the time it got there, although it could be argued it was an explosion after it was hit by a missile from a Diego Garcia fighter.
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#33

http://www.theweek.co.uk/flight-mh370/57...t-took-off

scroll down to "fly past theory" for another pilot's ideas

Quote:But analysis by a British pilot,
who believes the plane performed a final "fly-past" of Penang island
before intentionally landing in the sea Whip
suggests the search team might be looking in the wrong place.


Quote:spent six months analysing Inmarsat's satellite communication
"handshake" arcs and using mathematical "reverse engineering"  Dunno


assuming the possibility above suggested,
... "intentionally landed in the sea"  ... by a seasoned pilot,
assumes that the intention,
was to land on the water with as little damage as possible to the jet,
and just sink,
and to take the whole kitchen sink down to Davy Jones locker?


from EA's link
Quote:However, acoustic scientists have suggested
that a high energy sound
measured around the time the plane was thought to have crashed ...

 
Nowhere is there a direct quote from an islander to this effect.


Quote:Witnesses have also suggested that the plane was travelling north to south-east

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