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Rosetta stone"7 hours of terror" Philae approaches 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
#34
Like the aurora borealis?    Dunno
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#35
The Philae lander has detected organic molecules on the surface of its comet, scientists have confirmed.

Dr Fred Goessmann, principal investigator on the Cosac instrument, which made the organics detection, confirmed the find to BBC News. But he added that the team was still trying to interpret the results.

It has not been disclosed which molecules have been found, or how complex they are.

Preliminary results from the Mupus instrument, which deployed a hammer to the comet after Philae's landing, suggest there is a layer of dust 10-20cm thick on the surface with very hard water-ice underneath.

The ice would be frozen solid at temperatures encountered in the outer Solar System - Mupus data suggest this layer has a tensile strength similar to sandstone.





Article at: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30097648

Hmm2


Mellow


Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
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#36
Whoa!!!
Thanx for the link alemos!  Dance2

I noted the brevity of the post compared to the link and Realised. 

There were missing parts so eye edited them right into the threads context.

(11-19-2014, 12:04 PM)alemos link Wrote:Comet landing: Organic molecules detected by Philae
18 November 2014 Last updated at 11:48 ET

[Image: _79110193_79108784.jpg]
The Philae lander has detected organic molecules on the surface of its comet, scientists have confirmed.
Carbon-containing "organics" are the basis of life on Earth and may give clues to chemical ingredients delivered to our planet early in its history.

The compounds were picked up by a German-built instrument designed to "sniff" the comet's thin atmosphere.

Other analyses suggest the comet's surface is largely water-ice covered with a thin dust layer.

The European Space Agency (Esa) craft touched down on the Comet 67P on 12 November after a 10-year journey.


Dr Fred Goessmann, principal investigator on the Cosac instrument, which made the organics detection, confirmed the find to BBC News. But he added that the team was still trying to interpret the results.

It has not been disclosed which molecules have been found, or how complex they are.

But the results are likely to provide insights into the possible role of comets in contributing some of the chemical building blocks to the primordial mix from which life evolved on the early Earth.



Preliminary results from the Mupus instrument, which deployed a hammer to the comet after Philae's landing, suggest there is a layer of dust 10-20cm thick on the surface with very hard water-ice underneath.

The ice would be frozen solid at temperatures encountered in the outer Solar System - Mupus data suggest this layer has a tensile strength similar to sandstone...
Article at: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30097648




You left out the best part...
[move]  Scream ...The rest of the story... Pennywise[/move]




Quote:Alemos Linked Article Cont'd...

..."It's within a very broad spectrum of ice models. It was harder than expected at that location, but it's still within bounds," said Prof Mark McCaughrean, senior science adviser to Esa, told BBC News.

"People will be playing with [mathematical] models of pure water-ice mixed with certain amount of dust."

He explained: "You can't rule out rock, but if you look at the global story, we know the overall density of the comet is 0.4g/cubic cm. There's no way the thing's made of rock.

"It's more likely there's sintered ice at the surface with more porous material lower down that hasn't been exposed to the Sun in the same way."

After bouncing off the surface at least twice, Philae came to a stop in some sort of high-walled trap.

"The fact that we landed up against something may actually be in our favour. If we'd landed on the main surface, the dust layer may have been even thicker and it's possible we might not have gone down [to the ice]," said Prof McCaughrean.

Scientists had to race to perform as many key tests as they could before Philae's battery life ran out at the weekend.

On re-charge

A key objective was to drill a sample of "soil" and analyse it in Cosac's oven. But, disappointingly, the latest information suggest no soil was delivered to the instrument.

Prof McCaughrean explained: "We didn't necessarily see many organics in the signal. That could be because we didn't manage to pick up a sample. But what we know is that the drill went down to its full extent and came back up again."

"But there's no independent way to say: This is what the sample looks like before you put it in there."

Scientists are hopeful however that as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko approaches the Sun in coming months, Philae's solar panels will see sunlight again. This might allow the batteries to re-charge, and enable the lander to perform science once more.

"There's a trade off - once it gets too hot, Philae will die as well. There is a sweet spot," said Prof McCaughrean.

He added: "Given the fact that there is a factor of six, seven, eight in solar illumination and the last action we took was to rotate the body of Philae around to get the bigger solar panel in, I think it's perfectly reasonable to think it may well happen.

"By being in the shadow of the cliff, it might even help us, that we might not get so hot, even at full solar illumination. But if you don't get so hot that you don't overheat, have you got enough solar power to charge the system."

The lander's Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), designed to provide information on the elemental composition of the surface, seems to have partially seen a signal from its own lens cover - which could have dropped off at a strange angle because Philae was not lying flat.


http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30097648


Quote:
Quote:
Quote:Philae's solar panels will see sunlight again. This might allow the batteries to re-charge, and enable the lander to perform science once more.

"There's a trade off - once it gets too hot, Philae will die as well. AliveThere is a sweet spotDead," said Prof McCaughrean.

Right where we Left off. Rover


Inside of Comet 67P.

Here is/There was a "Schrödinger's Philae"


Rite where we Lift-off Mellow

[move]http://keithlaney.net/SMF/index.php?topic=15630.0[/move]



Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#37
They still keep saying ice.  The only supporting evidence is the overall density of the comet. They may well be right or they may find some very porous rock.

This is like the cliffhanger on the season finale of a tv show.  It is next to a cliff ya know.
&quot;Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.&quot; --Aldous Huxley
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#38
Millions of comets out there ... short and long period ...
and they already have wording that sums them all up to their current standard model ...

Quote:Preliminary results from the Mupus instrument,
which deployed a hammer to the comet  Rofl
after Philae's landing,
suggest there is a layer of dust 10-20cm thick on the surface
with very hard water-ice underneath.

yep ... just winky tink the comet on one little spot with a hammer,
and you have the whole comet summed up.


Quote:.."It's within a very broad spectrum Whistle of ice models.
It was harder than expected at that location,
but it's still within bounds,"
said Prof Mark McCaughrean, senior science adviser to Esa, told BBC News.


Quote:"People will be playing with [mathematical] models
of pure water-ice mixed with certain amount of dust."

Don't toss in any hard packed clay like material,
with pebbles, rocks, and boulders
all packed frozen together in some distinct areas of the comet ...
just use dust and water ice in the "mathematical models".


He explained:
Quote:"You can't rule out rock  Bricks
but if you look at the global story,
we know the overall density of the comet is 0.4g/cubic cm.
There's no way the thing's made of rock.

"It's more likely there's sintered ice at the surface
with more porous material lower down
that hasn't been exposed to the Sun in the same way."


... they really don't want to admit to any rock at all do they ....

Comets are still just dust Whip and water ice Whip

One hammer winky tinking the comet surface proves that Rofl

"Organic Molecules" ... are everywhere in the universe.
Some comets have more, some have less,
and some have very special organics.

More likely that areas of the comet are composed of what they say,
and other areas in the images are completely blowing them away
with unexpected possible compositions.


arnik says
Quote:The only supporting evidence is the overall density of the comet.

That, and a hammer that winky tinked the surface for inconclusive data.
Assuming that the data on overall density is correct as well...
Since harpoons failed, and recoil thrusters failed,
it seems that any instrument on board that has been through the tough trip there,
may have been compromised to a degree. 


Reply
#39
Whoa!!!
Thanx for the link alemos!  Dance2

No problem. Organics on the surface are not the only surprises this puppy has in store for us.

Currently working on the comet's signal "song" and have some potentially interesting preliminary results.

In the mean time, from newest released image

ESA_Rosetta_NAVCAM_141018_montage  (Looks like 18 Oct 2014?)


Source:

http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/sites/defaul...4x1024.jpg

Sub-image location:

[Image: surf-e-marked_zps019ed9f2.jpg]


Ya gotta love those piles of ice on the surface of Comet 67P.

Middle of image, guess this was a snowman at one time.  Whistle

[Image: surf-e2_zps01d9c134.jpg]


More later.

Mellow
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
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#40
http://www.classicfm.com/discover/music/...7p-philae/
Music emitted from Comet 67P sounds an awful lot like 20th-century harpsichord masterpiece
By Tim Edwards, 14th November 2014, 12:03

Comet 67P, currently the home of the European space probe Philae, is singing, according to scientists - and it really sounds like Ligeti.
Quote:The mission has already contributed greatly to our understanding of comets – and one discovery is of great interest to music lovers: scientists have revealed that the comet has been singing for four billion years. John Cage's 640-year-long Organ²/ASLSP doesn't come close.

So, how does a comet vocalise? Oscillations in the magnetic field of Comet 67P are creating a sound at a wavelength of around 40-50 millihertz, far below the range of human hearing. ESA scientists have increased the frequency by a factor of 10,000 in order to hear the song.

Karl-Heinz Glaßmeier, head of Space Physics and Space Sensorics at the Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany, says they are still trying to work out what is happening, but adds: "This is exciting because it is completely new to us."

That’s interesting, because after playing it in Classic FM towers, it didn't sound particularly new to us . Have a listen to the comet below – and then listen to Continuum for Harpsichord by 20th-century Hungarian composer Gyorgy Ligeti. In fact, why not go ahead and play both at the same time?
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
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#41
I'd believe there is a singing snake comment before eye had faith in a singing duck comet.

[Image: Space_rubber_duck.jpg]

quack.

Improv is as is was "as you were" now well aware.

[sub]itza[/sub]

[Image: Comet_on_9_August_2014_-_NavCam_zps5d2bb826.jpg]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#42
[Image: easy-pluck-5.jpg]
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#43
I don't know whether Philae had the equivalent of a g-meter or seismograph on-board. If it did, we might get some science out of them. Philae hit three times in three different locations. It might be possible to 'back out' some structural characteristics of the top few feet of the impact-surfaces from them...
Hunter S. Thompson: &quot;When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.&quot;
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#44
It was designed to take a hit.

[Image: Philae_s_instruments_white_background_no...mage_2.jpg]
It kept on hitting.[Image: 300px-Philae_lander_%28transparent_bg%29.png]

There is merit to using Philae itself as a yardstick for itz triple winky tinked quantum linked approach to the surface.

I use Philae as a constant in my approach to discovery.

Using Philae itself as a CONSTANT structurally may indeed unearth a new clue or two(or three). Whistle

[move]Watching from above:The probe is named after the Rosetta Stone, a stele of Egyptian origin featuring a decree in three scripts.[/move]


As a caveat to your excellent falcon eyed thought-post goshawk:
is that Philae may be Sonically/accoustically vibrated/levitated into relocation or destruction by the Duck- Song of 67p.
Or it may Be jetted out and relocated or destroyed by plasmatic/spasmatic outbursts as it approaches step by step SOL.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#45
Why the Rosetta mission is this generation's moon landing

Nov 21, 2014 by Sadie Jones, The Conversation

[Image: 2-whytherosett.jpg]
Robot on a comet, that’s all. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS, CC BY


Quote:The thing everyone seems to talk about with the moon landings is the idea of the whole world stopping to watch. It was a mission that overcame nationalism, it wasn't "America" putting a man on the moon, it was "Us" – humankind. With Rosetta, the whole world not only watched but they were part of a real-time conversation with mission control.

Over the next few months as scientists analyse the data sent back by Philae and Rosetta it might tell us many new things about our early solar system. The detailed pictures of the comet are our first look at this strange world. The data and pictures definitely have a place in inspiring people to become more interested in science, but there will always be something incredible about humans beings, or robots that humans have engineered, going out into space and actually touching down on worlds beyond our Earth.

didn't witness the moon landings, but despite that there has always been something about the subject of space that has totally entranced me. I am sure they have inspired many young and old to take an interest in science. In fact, I was so inspired during my primary education that when my teacher informed the class that for the last week of term we could do our own project, which could be on any subject, I chose, what I assumed to be, the most exciting and obvious choice: a project on space.

I remember researching as much as I could find in all the books my school library had to offer on the subject and then writing out my discoveries about the planets, the moon and astronauts onto multi-coloured A4 pages with a pencil, in my neatest handwriting and sticking them together to make a book. I even remember doing an elaborate drawing of an astronaut, which included a cutaway into his astronaut suit so you could see all the tubes inside the suit that helped him breathe and go to the toilet. My project workbook was one of the thickest in the class.

[Image: 3-whytherosett.jpg]
The leap for humanity. Credit: NASA, CC BY

I really think the buzz surrounding the Rosetta mission will generate this kind of excitement and I think it has actually provided us with a greater awareness of possible science careers. Now, after watching interviews with many of the scientists, engineers and control-room operatives, it is not just the astronauts or the landers that are the stars of the show.

The Rosetta mission gave the public an insight into something that was happening right now. They could feel the emotions of every minute and track the spacecraft in real time from wherever they were. They could put themselves in the place of the scientists in the control room, who were nervously waiting for news from Philae. They even had up-to-date information on what little Philae was "feeling" as he descended to the comet surface.

They could see that scientists and engineers all just looked like normal people, they weren't superhero-genius types with crazy hair. They even made mistakes. The public became part of this enormous community and through social media they could talk with people all over the world about the next stage in the mission and the science that would come out of it.

To quote my mother: "They landed on the moon, and that's big! But a comet, well, that's mind blowing! That's just a bit of rock flying through space!"

http://phys.org/news/2014-11-rosetta-mission-moon.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#46
I watched the Moon landings 'live'. I was glued to the screen when I was not taking classes or studying. I watched others not being interested in the slightest, even when the TV was in the same room...
              Dunno
Hunter S. Thompson: &quot;When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.&quot;
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#47
I'm sure this'll interest you.

As the Philae probe made its dicey landing, Rosetta was watching from afar. Now it has sent back what it saw
National Post Staff and Associated Press |
November 17, 2014 | Last Updated: Nov 17 2:50 PM ET

[Image: 2-whytherosett.jpg]
[From left to right, the images show the Philae lander descending towards and across the comet before touchdown.esa.

Quote:The European Space Agency released images of the Rosetta comet landing Monday, giving the most detailed glimpse yet at the historic touchdown. With the Philae lander now dormant and its exact location unknown, scientists are hoping the bird’s-eye images will help them find the probe.

Taken from the Rosetta mothership roughly 15 kilometres from the comet’s surface, the new photo sequence shows Philae “descending towards and across the comet before touchdown,” the ESA said in a blog post Monday.

During the landing Wednesday on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a harpoon meant to anchor Philae to the surface failed to deploy. So the washing machine-size probe rebounded after the initial touchdown, floating as high as kilometre above the surface. Scientists believe it touched down about a kilometre away from the initial site, in the shadow of a cliff — rendering its solar panels useless.

The final photo released Monday shows the probe heading east after it bounced from the first touchdown spot, ESA said. The Rosetta team is “confident” the new photos, when paired with close-up photos Philae took of its surroundings and other data, will help “soon reveal the lander’s whereabouts.”

Since the landing last week, Philae performed a series of scientific tests and sent reams of data back to Earth before depleted batteries silenced it on Saturday.

The lander was lifted on Friday by about 4 centimetres and rotated about 35 degrees in an effort to pull it out of a shadow so that solar panels could recharge the batteries, ESA’s blog said. It’s still unclear whether it succeeded in putting the solar panels out of the shade.

Even if the lander was rotated successfully and is able to recharge its batteries with sunlight, it may take weeks or months until it will send out new signals. Regular checks for signals will continue.

[Image: correction_comet_landing.jpg?w=620&h=464]
The combination photo of different images taken with the CIVA camera system released by the European Space Agency ESA on Thursday Nov. 13, 2014 shows Rosetta’s lander Philae as it is safely on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, as these first CIVA images confirm...

[Image: screen-shot-2014-11-13-at-10-33-18-am.jpg?w=620&h=377]
Landing manager Stephan Ulamec points to the area (in blue)  where scientists believe Philae landed after bouncing one kilometre into space. The red square marks the initial landing spot.

[Image: unknown.png?w=300&h=1052]


http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/11/17/...at-it-saw/
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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#48
  For all we know...

'Couple space plankton?
'Couple Crick And Watson hitchikers too?
'Couple BUZZ ALDRIN molecules three...etc.

Improv must dispense with the possible moments before the actual like shaking a x-mas present to guess what's inside.

shake...shake...shake...yahtzee!!!


[Image: dnasurvivesc.jpg]
http://phys.org/news/2014-11-dna-survive...earth.html

(11-10-2014, 01:07 AM)Wook link Wrote:just a couple
Whistle
Rofl

A Couple UZH scientists should do the trick. Koolaid

[Image: 1-dnasurvivesc.jpg]

DNA survives critical entry into Earth's atmosphere

2 hours ago


The experiment called DARE (DNA atmospheric re-entry experiment) resulted from a spontaneous idea: UZH scientists Dr. Cora Thiel and Professor Ullrich were conducting experiments on the TEXUS-49 mission to study the role of gravity in the regulation of gene expression in human cells using remote-controlled hardware inside the rocket's payload. During the mission preparations, they began to wonder whether the outer structure of the rocket might also be suitable for stability tests on so-called biosignatures. "Biosignatures are molecules that can prove the existence of past or present extraterrestrial life," explains Dr. Thiel. And so the two UZH researchers launched a small second mission at the European rocket station Esrange in Kiruna, north of the Arctic Circle.
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
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#49
Oxford team shed light on ancient Egyptian obelisk

Nov 25, 2014

[Image: oxfordteamsh.jpg]

Quote:History was made this month as the robotic Philae lander completed the first controlled touchdown on a comet. The European Space Agency-led project was set up to obtain images of a comet's surface and help scientists to understand what a comet is made of.

The lander and the Rosetta probe which transported it were named after two of the objects which were crucial in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs: the Rosetta stone and the Philae obelisk. Back on earth, a team from the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents in Oxford's Classics Faculty are using a powerful digital imaging system, Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), to study the inscriptions on the obelisk more closely than ever before.

'The Centre is home to an exciting new study of Ptolemaic inscriptions (a Hellenistic kingdom based in Egypt in the fourth to first centuries BC) and the Philae obelisk and Rosetta stone are the jewels of the crown of that corpus,' said Dr Jane Masséglia of the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents (CSAD). Both include inscriptions in Egyptian hieroglyphs and ancient Greek, but while the Rosetta stone's inscriptions are direct translations of one another, the inscriptions on the obelisk are different.

'Both ancient Greek and Egyptian scripts on the obelisk mention the names 'Ptolemy' and 'Cleopatra' which helped nineteenth-century scholars to use their knowledge of ancient Greek to translate some of the Egyptian hieroglyphs.'

The obelisk is one of two found at Philae in Upper Egypt in 1815. It was acquired by William John Bankes, who brought it to his estate at Kingston Lacy in Dorset, now owned by the National Trust.

'After 200 years being battered by the English weather in Dorset, and because of the naturally speckled pink and black granite, it's difficult for the human eye to read all of the inscriptions,' said Dr Masséglia.

'RTI has let us take images of the obelisk in such a way that can remove the colour. It produces a computer reconstruction of the surface of the object, based on reflections of light, so we have been able to produce clearer images of the inscriptions than ever before.'

The Oxford team is currently analysing the images taken from the obelisk but they have already made some findings about the inscriptions. 'We have an early nineteenth-century drawing of the obelisk, made just before it was announced that hieroglyphs had been deciphered,' said Dr Masséglia. 'Now that we have the high-quality RTI images, we can say that whoever produced that drawing really knew what they were doing. It's a very good record for such an early date and may even be the very document that was sent by Bankes to Champollion, the man credited with the eventual decipherment of hieroglyphs.

'Our next project is to complete the reading of the ancient Greek inscription on the base, which has never been entirely legible, not even when Bankes first saw it in Philae. We can see that it records a petition from the priests of Philae to Ptolemy VIII and his two wives, asking to be exempted from tax. But large sections of the text are badly worn, and RTI is the technology to help us complete the picture. It's very exciting.'

CSAD hosts several research projects that are using RTI to investigate important areas of classical scholarship. Projects include studying Roman letters from Vindolanda near Hadrian's Wall, ancient curse tablets from Roman Gloucestershire, and a new study of the Latin inscriptions in the Ashmolean Museum.

'The technology is so exciting because we can apply it to so many different ancient artefacts which cannot be fully understood by the human eye,' said Dr Masséglia. 'Our RTI expert, Ben Altshuler, has also been working with colleagues in the Beazley archive to study microscopic marks on ancient gems and even Greek vases.

'It's so good, it can even show which line was painted over which, and see the marks of preparatory drawings underneath the glaze. You can imagine what a difference this could make to someone's experience of archaeology. Whether at the museum or sitting at home, they could use the RTI software to examine an object in minute detail, and see more than they ever could with the naked eye.'


Explore further: Historical comet-landing site is looking for a name

Provided by Oxford University
http://phys.org/news/2014-11-oxford-team...elisk.html
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#50
MUPUS broke???  Scream

(11-22-2014, 04:14 AM)goshawks link Wrote:I don't know whether Philae had the equivalent of a g-meter or seismograph on-board. If it did, we might get some science out of them. Philae hit three times in three different locations. It might be possible to 'back out' some structural characteristics of the top few feet of the impact-surfaces from them...





[move]Incomming!!! ...can a Duck comet Duck???  Dunno Dunno Dunno[/move]

Listen to the thump of Philae landing on comet 67P


14:53 20 November 2014 by Jacob Aron

[Image: dn26593-1_1200.jpg]

Quote:So that's what landing on a comet sounds like. Researchers at the German Aerospace Centre have just released a short clip recorded by the European Space Agency's Philae probe as it first made contact with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last week.

Hear the moment it landed
https://soundcloud.com/dlrde/touchdown-p...-comet-67p

The recording, made by the lander's Cometary Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE), is just 2 seconds long, but contains a lot of scientific information. CASSE detects vibrations through the lander's feet, which can be converted into sound. It suggests that the comet's surface has soft layer several centimetres thick on top of a much harder, icy layer. That is in line with the findings of another of Philae's instruments, MUPUS, which broke while attempting to hammer through the surface

Philae landed on the comet three times on 12 November. This recording is from the first landing, and confirms that the spacecraft did not immediately return to the surface of the comet after bouncing.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26...t-67p.html
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#51
#Rosettawatch: homing in on Philae's resting spot

17:39 25 November 2014 by Jacob Aron


[Image: dn26612-1_1106.jpg]
Philae's possible landing locations

Quote:It has been two weeks since the Philae spacecraft touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, but the European Space Agency still doesn't know if it successfully drilled the comet's surface. They don't even know where it finally came to rest. Meanwhile, its orbiting companion Rosetta is continuing its mission.

Readings from CONSERT, a radar instrument that linked Philae with Rosetta before the lander ran out of power, have narrowed potential landing spots to a 350 metre by 30 metre strip on the comet's head. Scientists at the ESA are now searching images from Rosetta's cameras to see if they can spot Philae, but it is in a region of deep shadow and is only likely to show up when light bounces off its solar panels.

As for Philae's drill, it was one of the last instruments to be activated before the lander switched off. Mission managers know the drill operated as expected, but because the probe was sitting at angle they don't know whether it delivered a sample to the COSAC instrument. This was designed to study molecules from the comet by heating material in an oven and measuring the resulting gas.

Rosetta ramping up
COSAC's data is inconclusive. There may not have been a sample, or the sample may have been too dry, meaning only small amounts of gas were released. "I would have loved to see a clear signal from a clear sample," says COSAC lead Fred Goesmann. "My pessimistic view is we'll never know."



Advertisement:Replay Ad
[Image: Heisenberg%20uncertainy%20principle.jpg]



That could be the case even if the ESA can reconnect with Philae, were it to wake up as more sunlight hits its solar panels . The lander's drill has no direct way of confirming it has taken a sample, and there is no camera in the oven the sample was delivered to, even though other lower-temperature ovens on the probe have such cameras. Goesmann says scientists discussed other sensors to confirm a sample during mission planning, but they discarded the idea because of strict weight limits on the lander.

No more data is expected from Philae any time soon, but having delivered the lander, Rosetta is now ramping up its scientific mission. The ESA has placed the spacecraft back into a higher orbit, 30 kilometres above the comet, but it will dip to 20 kilometres on 3 December for 10 days to gather data on the increasing dust and gas spewing from 67P as it nears the sun. The plan is to stay as close to the comet as possible without putting Rosetta at risk from the comet's increasing activity.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26...-spot.html

Philae:
[Image: schrodingers-cat-is-alive-dead.jpg]
Itz in a Coma... literally.
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#52
Me:
Quote:I don't know whether Philae had the equivalent of a g-meter or seismograph on-board. If it did, we might get some science out of them. Philae hit three times in three different locations. It might be possible to 'back out' some structural characteristics of the top few feet of the impact-surfaces from them...

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26...t-67p.html
Quote:The recording, made by the lander's Cometary Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE), is just 2 seconds long, but contains a lot of scientific information. CASSE detects vibrations through the lander's feet, which can be converted into sound. It suggests that the comet's surface has soft layer several centimetres thick on top of a much harder, icy layer. That is in line with the findings of another of Philae's instruments, MUPUS, which broke while attempting to hammer through the surface

Philae landed on the comet three times on 12 November.
(My Bolding.)

EA, thanks for the update on the CASSE instrument. If CASSE shows similar 'vibrations' on the other two 'landings', that might be a good 'characterization' of at least the local surface. It will be interesting to see what scientists can pull out of those 'vibrations'...

Also, I wonder if some really-precise Doppler measurements on landing(s) might give some sense of 'instantaneous' g-forces on touchdown (by changes in velocity) - and thus indirectly 'structure'...
Hunter S. Thompson: &quot;When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.&quot;
Reply
#53
There  is no evidence for a hard icy layer.  It could be a rocky layer. It could be something else.  They gave speculation as fact.
&quot;Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.&quot; --Aldous Huxley
Reply
#54
Comet 67P's "Song"

19 August 2014, Posted previously (3 months ago)

Re: Rosetta pursuit - did we get there first ?
« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2014, 05:28:29 PM »

[Image: email_zps912f1b35.jpg]

Basic info:

NASA detected radio bursts from this "Comet".
Can change trajectory at will.
Shows signs on the outside of machine like parts.
Being disguised as a comet.

Sounds like crap.......until

11 November 2014, ESA announces that comet is singing a "song":

On the night of November 11, 2014, ESA announced that the Rosetta spacecraft
carrying the Philae lander had recorded a “song” emanating from Comet
67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta’s Plasma Consortium – a suite of five
instruments used to study 67P – detected the sound, which cannot be heard by
the human ear at 40 to 50 millihertz (outside the range of human hearing).

Article at:

http://earthsky.org/space/as-philae-deta...comet-song


Download actual MP3 audio file from here:

http://www.classicfm.com/discover/music/...7p-philae/

The following screenshots were produced using a program called Raven. The
program allows the user to examine sound files (in this case WAV files), while
producing both a graphical signal window, and a graphical spectrogram window.

The original file was in MP3 format and was converted to WAV format which is
one of the required formats for this particular software.

The program (RAVEN Lite) is available (free) from Cornell University here:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp/raven/r...rview.html

Now to the signal itself.

The signal occurs on two channels, and is slightly different.



[Image: 2-channels-marked_zps9f6705ac.jpg]

From the beginning, I suspected this to have more data than just what was
observed from this original capture.

It reminded me of a possible compressed data signal. So the following examples
were generated for the entire signal at 1 minute, at 10 seconds, at 1 second
and at 3/10ths of a second.

As is evident, this process revealed what appears to be an actual analog
signal.

Signal is on top, Spectrogram on the bottom in each frame.


[Image: sig-at-1-minuteduration_zps127958a6.jpg]

[Image: 67P-10-sec_zps5cd23023.jpg]


[Image: 67P-1-sec_zps824a81fe.jpg]


[Image: sig-3-tenths-of-sec_zpsf1bd3abd.jpg]



If you listen to the sound at a slower speed, it sounds just like (to me) a
motor running at slow speed and then increasing and decreasing its speed at
various points in the file, due to (perhaps) a load on the motor.

There may be additional information other than the "motor" sound which seems to be a background event. At this point Dunno
Still examining the file using various other software.

You can use the cited program (RAVEN) to listen to the file at a RATE value of .3 or locate another program which will allow you to slow down the playback.




Mellow
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
Reply
#55
Reminds me of an airplane getting ready to take off.
Seek and ye shall find. JESUS
------------------------------------------
I am a recovering vegetarian   Hi
Reply
#56
Mayito...
What if Philae "Relocates"

Actually loses its tenuos grip and without harpooned cable-tows, repositions itself.

It may yet just jet to a new locale...ya never know since this is a quantum thread.

When the sun enters the scene things may or may not change.
depends on pov. That was my first post after post #5050

[sup] EA
Non Official Cover

Posts: 5051
Mojo: 13

[/sup]
50/50  Reefer
[sub]« Reply #55 on: Today at 09:56:17 PM »[/sub]

Yesterday = day [sup]333[/sup] don't gamble with improv. Rover Today = day [sub]334[/sub]
[move]50 [glow=red,2,300]Here is / There Was[/glow] a "Schrödinger's Cat" 50[/move]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#57
(11-27-2014, 11:02 PM)ArniK link Wrote:There  is no evidence for a hard icy layer.  It could be a rocky layer. It could be something else.  They gave speculation as fact.


Exactly.
And they know that with conditions of the lander where it is,
and the rest of the mystery of drill samples unconfirmed,
and the MUPUS breakdown, etc.,
they can maintain the ice model indefinitely now.

Quote: The lander's drill has no direct way of confirming it has taken a sample,
and there is no camera in the oven the sample was delivered to,
even though other lower-temperature ovens on the probe have such cameras.

then

Quote:That is in line with the findings of another of Philae's instruments,
MUPUS, which broke
while attempting to hammer through the surface


They had to send a "hammer" expecting .... some ice .... actually they call it a "penetrator"


Quote: The PEN (penetrator) is basically a hollow rod of 35 cm length ....
.... an electromagnetic hammering mechanism.


Comet surface -- Wall <---- MUPUS  Whip



Reply
#58
EA:
Quote:What if Philae "Relocates"? Actually loses its tenuous grip and without harpooned cable-tows, repositions itself.

I am curious about whether 'blowouts' around Philae on the way towards the sun will have enough 'pressure' to offset the ultra-weak gravitational field and cause a 'takeoff'...
Hunter S. Thompson: &quot;When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.&quot;
Reply
#59
Many anomalous surface features!

Down load this puppy and closely examine it.

Rotate it left or right.

If it's so black, how are color images possible?

Is Rosetta's comet really red? First true-color shot of 67P

    Up until now, images of the comet seen by the public have been taken in the grey-scale using Navcam
    The image will be released at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco on December 15
    Esa has yet to confirm if this is 'true colour' or if the colours were used to highlight geographical features
    Scientists had previously said comet was 'blacker than charcoal' following data from the Alice instrument
    There has been some controversy over why such colour images of the comet have been kept a secret


(Color images kept secret? Cause it's not a comet)

(Red, cause it's rust)

[Image: xO7GlOj.png]


Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...black.html


Mellow
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
Reply
#60
Mars is red from rust
which come from water & life.
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#61
It will be interesting to see the results of the radar penetration scans when (if) they are released.  Hmm2
Reply
#62
(12-01-2014, 12:56 AM)goshawks link Wrote:EA:
Quote:What if Philae "Relocates"? Actually loses its tenuous grip and without harpooned cable-tows, repositions itself.

I am curious about whether 'blowouts' around Philae on the way towards the sun will have enough 'pressure' to offset the ultra-weak gravitational field and cause a 'takeoff'...


I think I can aide you there...
ESA said at philae press conferences that philae weighed Approximately 1 Gram.  Mellow
Also recall that the Gravity is zoned around the singing rubber duck in odd and uneven ways and a barycenter is fowled/fouled as it loses mass as a constant to jettisoned gas and plasmonics over time.


The "Potsdam gravity potato" shows variations in Earth's gravity

11 hours ago by Matt Williams, Universe Today

[Image: thepotsdamgr.jpg]
The Earth’s gravitational model (aka the “Potsdam Potato”) is based on data from the LAGEOS, GRACE, and GOCE satellites and surface data. Credit: GFZ


Quote:People tend to think of gravity here on Earth as a uniform and consistent thing. Stand anywhere on the globe, at any time of year, and you'll feel the same downward pull of a single G. But in fact, Earth's gravitational field is subject to variations that occur over time. This is due to a combination of factors, such as the uneven distributions of mass in the oceans, continents, and deep interior, as well as climate-related variables like the water balance of continents, and the melting or growing of glaciers.

And now, for the first time ever, these variations have been captured in the image known as the "Potsdam Gravity Potato" –  a visualization of the Earth's gravity field model produced by the German Research Center for Geophysics' (GFZ) Helmholtz's Center in Potsdam, Germany.

And as you can see from the image above, it bears a striking resemblance to a potato. But what is more striking is the fact that through these models, the Earth's gravitational field is depicted not as a solid body, but as a dynamic surface that varies over time.This new gravity field model (which is designated EIGEN-6C) was made using measurements obtained from the LAGEOS, GRACE, and GOCE satellites, as well as ground-based gravity measurements and data from the satellite altimetry.

Compared to the previous model obtained in 2005 (shown above), EIGEN-6C has a fourfold increase in spatial resolution.

"Of particular importance is the inclusion of measurements from the satellite GOCE, from which the GFZ did its own calculation of the gravitational field," says Dr. Christoph Foerste who directs the gravity field work group at GFZ along with Dr. Frank Flechtner.

[Image: 1-thepotsdamgr.jpg]
The 2005 model, which was based on data from the CHAMP and GRACE satellites and surface data, was less refined than the latest one. Credit: GFZ

The ESA mission GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) was launched in mid-March 2009 and has since been measuring the Earth's gravitational field using satellite gradiometry – the study and measurement of variations in the acceleration due to gravity.

"This allows the measurement of gravity in inaccessible regions with unprecedented accuracy, for example in Central Africa and the Himalayas," said Dr. Flechtner. In addition, the GOCE satellites offers advantages when it comes to measuring the oceans.

Within the many open spaces that lie under the sea, the Earth's gravity field shows variations. GOCE is able to better map these, as well as deviations in the ocean's surface – a factor known as "dynamic ocean topography" – which is a result of Earth's gravity affecting the ocean's surface equilibrium.

Long-term measurement data from the GFZ's twin-satellite mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) were also included in the model. By monitoring climate-based variables like the melting of large glaciers in the polar regions and the amount of seasonal water stored in large river systems, GRACE was able to determine the influence of large-scale temporal changes on the gravitational field.

[Image: 2-thepotsdamgr.jpg]


Given the temporal nature of climate-related processes – not to mention the role played by Climate Change – ongoing missions are needed to see how they effect our planet long-term. Especially since the GRACE mission is scheduled to end in 2015.

In total, some 800 million observations went into the computation of the final model which is composed of more than 75,000 parameters representing the global gravitational field. The GOCE satellite alone made 27,000 orbits during its period of service (between March 2009 and November 2013) in order to collect data on the variations in the Earth's gravitational field.

The final result achieved centimeter accuracy, and can serve as a global reference for sea levels and heights. Beyond the "gravity community," the research has also piqued the interest of researchers in aerospace engineering, atmospheric sciences, and space debris.

But above all else, it offers scientists a way of imaging the world that is different from, but still complimentary to, approaches based on light, magnetism, and seismic waves. And it could be used for everything from determining the speed of ocean currents from space, monitoring rising sea levels and melting ice sheets, to uncovering hidden features of continental geology and even peeking at the convection force driving plate tectonics.
source:Universe Today
http://phys.org/news/2014-12-potsdam-gra...earth.html



Coma means hair.  :hrm:


Splitting hairs on the possibility of corpereal relocation is rather an uncertain quantative thought-experiment like Alive/Dead.

But if Philae only weighs a gram it better be redhair. Reefer Rofl Reefer Rofl Reefer Rofl



Astronaut Uses Single Strand of Hair to Propel Herself

Date:October 23, 2013

Quote:Source:Buzz60 / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:During conversations in preparation for the movie 'Gravity,' NASA astronaut Cady Coleman told actress Sandra Bullock all it takes to propel oneself in zero-gravity is a single strand of hair. Jen Markham has the video of one astronaut aboard the International Space Station demonstrating the power of hair in space.

[flash=560,315]https://www.youtube.com/v/jA2l-EDLNH4[/flash]

Gravity nodes will change in due course from mass waste to the coma tail.

Coma means hair.

[sub]English[edit]Wikipedia has an article on:
ComaWikipedia

Pronunciation[edit](UK) IPA(key): /?k??m?/
(US) enPR: k??m?, IPA(key): /?ko?m?/
Homophone: comber (in non-rhotic accents)
Etymology 1[edit]From Ancient Greek ???? (kôma, “deep sleep”).

Noun[edit]coma (plural comas)

1.A state of sleep from which one may not wake up, usually induced by some form of trauma.
Related terms[edit]comatose
See also[edit]persistent vegetative state
brain death
Translations[edit]Deep sleepArabic: ?????? f (ghibuuba)Bulgarian: ???? f (kóma)Catalan: coma mChinese: Mandarin: ?? (zh) (h?nmí), ?? (zh) (h?nshuì)Czech: bezv?domí (cs) n, kóma nDanish: komaDutch: coma (nl) nFinnish: kooma (fi), tajuttomuus (fi)French: coma (fr) mGerman: Koma (de) nGreek: ???? (el) n (kóma), ???????? (el) m (líthargos) (means "deep sleep" but it's better translated as "lethargy")Hebrew: ????? (he) f (tardemet)Icelandic: dá (is) n, svefndá n, dauðadá (is) nItalian: coma (it) f  Japanese: ?? (????, konsui)Korean: ?? (ko) (honsu) (?? (ko))Lithuanian: koma (lt) fLuxembourgish: Koma mPolish: ?pi?czka f, koma (pl) fPortuguese: coma (pt) mRomanian: com? (ro) fRussian: ????? (ru) f (kóma)Serbo-Croatian: Cyrillic: ???? fRoman: koma (sh) fSlovak: bezvedomie n, kóma fSpanish: coma (es) mSwedish: koma (sv)Turkish: koma (tr)Welsh: côma m
Etymology 2[edit]From Latin coma (“hair of the head”), from Ancient Greek ???? (kóm?, “hair”).

Noun[edit]? coma (plural comae)
1.(astronomy) A cloud of dust surrounding the nucleus of a comet.
2.(optics) A defect characterized by diffuse, pear-shaped images that should be points.
3.(botany) A tuft or bunch, such as the assemblage of branches forming the head of a tree, a cluster of bracts when empty and terminating the inflorescence of a plant, or a tuft of long hairs on certain seeds.
Translations[edit]Cloud surrounding a comet nucleus[/sub]





Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#63
Let's face it.

Philae needs to:


(11-09-2014, 10:25 PM)EA link Wrote:Mellow
Quote:[8]
8.Jump up ^ Plut. Is. et Osir. p, 359; Diod. i. 22
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philae
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#64
The quest for organic molecules on the surface of 67P/C-G:

From: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/12/02/...of-67pc-g/




a slightly different experiment was also conducted on 14 November, which was completed only 45 minutes before Philae went into hibernation as its primary battery was exhausted.

For this “last gasp” experiment, the team used a specialised oven, the so-called “CASE” oven, to determine the composition of volatiles (and perhaps any particulates) that had accumulated in it. The Ptolemy team also used the same opportunity to reconfigure their analytical procedures, to see if they could make some isotopic measurements. Unfortunately, there was no chance to use Ptolemy in conjunction with SD2, as this was confined to the sister instrument, COSAC, given the limited power and time available.

Results released by ESA Rosetta

[Image: Ptolemy_table-1024x605_zpsbb9433bb.png]


Water AND Organics. Dance2



Mellow
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
Reply
#65
Dance2
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#66
http://www.universetoday.com/117363/a-st...z3MBPqePC7
[Image: ciffs2-754x1024.jpg]
The Cliffs of Churyumov-Gerasimenko: an enhanced and procosessed crop of an image from Rosetta’s navcam. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, processing by Stuart Atkinson.
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
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