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Rosetta stone"7 hours of terror" Philae approaches 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
#67
[move] "Perihelion Cliff" [/move]
Agilkia is no longer the ACTUAL landing site name.


#Rosettawatch: first snaps of Philae's arrival on 67P

15:57 18 December 2014 by Jacob Aron

[Image: dn26718-1_1200.jpg]
(Image: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA)

(11-09-2014, 10:25 PM)EA link Wrote:Mellow
Quote:[8]
8.Jump up ^ Plut. Is. et Osir. p, 359; Diod. i. 22
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philae

Quote:Here's what you see when you bounce off a comet. This blurry picture, the first image snapped by the European Space Agency's Philae lander after its touchdown on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November, was one of the initial warning signs that things hadn't gone as planned.

[Image: dn26718-2_1200.jpg]
(Image: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA)

Philae was travelling at around 3 kilometres an hour when it hit the surface of the comet, but the harpoons and thruster designed to anchor it to the landing spot failed and it bounced a kilometre into the air. The probe came back down around two hours later and after a second, shorter bounce it came to rest in the shadow of a cliff. The team are now calling it "Perihelion Cliff", and it is shown above in an overexposed version of a previously released image.

[Image: dn26718-3_1200.jpg]
Model showing Philae's possible position in relation to Perihelion Cliff(Image: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CNES/FD/CIVA)

These two images from Philae's CIVA camera were presented yesterday at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, California, by lead Philae scientist Jean-Pierre Bibring. He is confident that sunlight will creep over Perihelion Cliff as comet 67P moves closer to the sun, eventually reviving the sleeping probe.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26...n-67p.html

"Perihelion Cliff", Hmm2


I like that!!! Dance2
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#68
Improv:

[move]"It was like we had discovered the 'Rosetta Stone' that connected two different languages,"[/move]
(11-27-2014, 01:01 AM)EA link Wrote:#Rosettawatch: homing in on Philae's resting spot

17:39 25 November 2014 by Jacob Aron


[Image: dn26612-1_1106.jpg]
Philae's possible landing locations

Quote:It has been two weeks since the Philae spacecraft touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, but the European Space Agency still doesn't know if it successfully drilled the comet's surface. They don't even know where it finally came to rest. Meanwhile, its orbiting companion Rosetta is continuing its mission.

Readings from CONSERT, a radar instrument that linked Philae with Rosetta before the lander ran out of power, have narrowed potential landing spots to a 350 metre by 30 metre strip on the comet's head. Scientists at the ESA are now searching images from Rosetta's cameras to see if they can spot Philae, but it is in a region of deep shadow and is only likely to show up when light bounces off its solar panels.

As for Philae's drill, it was one of the last instruments to be activated before the lander switched off. Mission managers know the drill operated as expected, but because the probe was sitting at angle they don't know whether it delivered a sample to the COSAC instrument. This was designed to study molecules from the comet by heating material in an oven and measuring the resulting gas.

Rosetta ramping up
COSAC's data is inconclusive. There may not have been a sample, or the sample may have been too dry, meaning only small amounts of gas were released. "I would have loved to see a clear signal from a clear sample," says COSAC lead Fred Goesmann. "My pessimistic view is we'll never know."



Advertisement:Replay Ad
[Image: Heisenberg%20uncertainy%20principle.jpg]



That could be the case even if the ESA can reconnect with Philae, were it to wake up as more sunlight hits its solar panels . The lander's drill has no direct way of confirming it has taken a sample, and there is no camera in the oven the sample was delivered to, even though other lower-temperature ovens on the probe have such cameras. Goesmann says scientists discussed other sensors to confirm a sample during mission planning, but they discarded the idea because of strict weight limits on the lander.

No more data is expected from Philae any time soon, but having delivered the lander, Rosetta is now ramping up its scientific mission. The ESA has placed the spacecraft back into a higher orbit, 30 kilometres above the comet, but it will dip to 20 kilometres on 3 December for 10 days to gather data on the increasing dust and gas spewing from 67P as it nears the sun. The plan is to stay as close to the comet as possible without putting Rosetta at risk from the comet's increasing activity.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26...-spot.html

Philae:
[Image: schrodingers-cat-is-alive-dead.jpg]
Itz in a Coma... literally.





[Image: dn26718-3_1200.jpg]

Quantum physics just got less complicated

Dec 19, 2014

[Image: 5-quantumphysi.jpg]
Quantum physics says that particles can behave like waves, and vice versa. Researchers have now shown that this 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum uncertainty principle in disguise. Credit: Timothy Yeo / CQT, National University of Singapore

Quote:Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications.

Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one.

"The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you consider them as questions about what information you can gain about a system. Our result highlights the power of thinking about physics from the perspective of information," says Wehner, who is now an Associate Professor at QuTech at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

The discovery deepens our understanding of quantum physics and could prompt ideas for new applications of wave-particle duality.

Wave-particle duality is the idea that a quantum object can behave like a wave, but that the wave behaviour disappears if you try to locate the object. It's most simply seen in a double slit experiment, where single particles, electrons, say, are fired one by one at a screen containing two narrow slits. The particles pile up behind the slits not in two heaps as classical objects would, but in a stripy pattern like you'd expect for waves interfering. At least this is what happens until you sneak a look at which slit a particle goes through - do that and the interference pattern vanishes.

The quantum uncertainty principle is the idea that it's impossible to know certain pairs of things about a quantum particle at once. For example, the more precisely you know the position of an atom, the less precisely you can know the speed with which it's moving. It's a limit on the fundamental knowability of nature, not a statement on measurement skill. The new work shows that how much you can learn about the wave versus the particle behaviour of a system is constrained in exactly the same way.

Wave-particle duality and uncertainty have been fundamental concepts in quantum physics since the early 1900s. "We were guided by a gut feeling, and only a gut feeling, that there should be a connection," says Coles, who is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Quantum Computing in Waterloo, Canada.

It's possible to write equations that capture how much can be learned about pairs of properties that are affected by the uncertainty principle. Coles, Kaniewski and Wehner are experts in a form of such equations known as 'entropic uncertainty relations', and they discovered that all the maths previously used to describe wave-particle duality could be reformulated in terms of these relations.

"It was like we had discovered the 'Rosetta Stone' that connected two different languages," says Coles. "The literature on wave-particle duality was like hieroglyphics that we could now translate into our native tongue. We had several eureka moments when we finally understood what people had done," he says.

Because the entropic uncertainty relations used in their translation have also been used in proving the security of quantum cryptography - schemes for secure communication using quantum particles - the researchers suggest the work could help inspire new cryptography protocols.

In earlier papers, Wehner and collaborators found connections between the uncertainty principle and other physics, namely quantum 'non-locality' and the second law of thermodynamics. The tantalising next goal for the researchers is to think about how these pieces fit together and what bigger picture that paints of how nature is constructed.


Explore further: Duality principle is 'safe and sound': Researchers clear up apparent violation of wave-particle duality

More information: "Equivalence of wave-particle duality to entropic uncertainty" Nature Communications DOI: 10.1038/ncomm6814 (2014) Preprint available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.4687


Journal reference: Nature Communications 

Provided by National University of Singapore
http://phys.org/news/2014-12-quantum-phy...cated.html





(11-30-2014, 01:56 AM)EA link Wrote:Mayito...
What if Philae "Relocates"

Actually loses its tenuos grip and without harpooned cable-tows, repositions itself.

It may yet just jet to a new locale...ya never know since this is a quantum thread.

When the sun enters the scene things may or may not change.
depends on pov. That was my first post after post #5050

[sup] EA
Non Official Cover

Posts: 5051
Mojo: 13

[/sup]
50/50  Reefer
[sub]« Reply #55 on: Today at 09:56:17 PM »[/sub]

Yesterday = day [sup]333[/sup] don't gamble with improv. Rover Today = day [sub]334[/sub]
[move]50 [glow=red,2,300]Here is / There Was[/glow] a "Schrödinger's Cat" 50[/move]

They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one.

[move]"Perihelion Cliff" [/move]

I like how everthing entered the scene like Dynamic Convergence.
This is getting easier...  Dance2

Yak"We were guided by a gut feeling, and only a gut feeling, that there should be a connection,"

Itza read into it what it reads intuit.  Mellow

Itza Write intuit that gets Rite into it.
Like soft clay if you press a reed into it to read after you baked it. Reefer
[Image: Cuneiform_booklet_thumb.GIF]




Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#69
Farewell ‘J’, hello Agilkia introducing the Third Name where "x" marks the spot.

[glow=red,2,300]"Perihelion Cliff"[/glow]

(11-17-2014, 01:45 AM)EA link Wrote:Farewell ‘J’, hello Agilkia

[Image: rosetta20140915cr_740.jpg]

Quote:Farewell ‘J’, hello Agilkia

4 November 2014
The site where Rosetta’s Philae lander is scheduled to touch down on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 12 November now has a name: Agilkia.

The landing site, previously known as ‘Site J’, is named for Agilkia Island, an island on the Nile River in the south of Egypt. A complex of Ancient Egyptian buildings, including the famous Temple of Isis, was moved to Agilkia from the island of Philae when the latter was flooded during the building of the Aswan dams last century.

The name was selected by a jury comprising members of the Philae Lander Steering Committee as part of a public competition run 16–22 October by ESA and the German, French and Italian space agencies.

Agilkia was one of the most popular entries – it was proposed by over 150 participants. The committee selected Alexandre Brouste from France as the overall winner. As a prize, Mr Brouste will be invited to ESA’s Space Operations Control Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, to follow the landing live.

Although perhaps not quite as complicated as navigating Rosetta and Philae towards the comet, the task of choosing a name was by no means simple. More than 8000 entries from 135 countries were received in one week, showing great creativity and cultural diversity.

“The decision was very tough,” says Prof. Felix Huber of the DLR German Aerospace Center, chair of the Steering Committee.

“We received so many good suggestions on how to name Site J, and we were delighted with such an enthusiastic response from all over the world. We wish to thank all participants for sharing their great ideas with us.”

Participants proposed names in a variety of languages, both ancient and modern; some were even in Esperanto. There were also some interesting acronyms, curious sequences of digits, and onomatopoeiac words.

The entries covered a tremendous range of themes, from abstract concepts to the names of places on Earth. As with the winning entry, many suggestions echoed the Egyptian origins of Rosetta and Philae, named in recognition of milestones in decoding hieroglyphics, the sacred writing system of ancient Egypt.

Many names dated back to the history of our planet’s exploration, as those journeys into the unknown are the natural forebears of Rosetta and Philae. Mythological names from all over the globe were also proposed, including gods and goddesses of water, fertility, life and creation, relating closely to the fundamental themes investigated by the mission.

Other names were drawn from ancient history and prehistory, while others recalled milestones in the history of science, particularly the history of our understanding of comets.


The progress of the Space Age was also honoured by many entries. There were many references to science fiction, celebrating the work of Jules Verne, Arthur C. Clarke and Douglas Adams, among others.

Fictional characters from films, television shows, literary and musical works were also proposed. Some even referred to the virtual astronauts of the Kerbal Space Program, a popular online space exploration game. 

Several entries acknowledged the Rosetta mission as an endeavour achieved through the cooperation of many European countries, while others referred to its groundbreaking technical and scientific achievements.

And, of course, there was no shortage of more humorous entries, many referring to the resemblance of the comet’s nucleus to a rubber duck, a potato or even the cartoon dog, Snoopy.

But the final choice is Agilkia, which is how the landing site on the comet will be referred to by ESA and its mission partners.

“And it couldn’t be a more appropriate name,” comments Fred Jansen, ESA Rosetta mission manager. “The relocation of the temples of Philae Island to Agilkia Island was an ambitious technical endeavour performed in the 1960s and 1970s to preserve an archaeological record of our ancient history.

“In eight days’ time, Philae will be deployed from the orbiter onto Agilkia. On 12 November, we’ll be attempting a unique comet landing, an even more ambitious endeavour to unlock secrets of our most remote origins.”

About the landing
Rosetta will release Philae at 08:35 GMT/09:35 CET on 12 November at a distance of 22.5 km from the centre of the comet, with a scheduled landing about seven hours later at Agilkia.

Taking into account the signal travel time from Rosetta on 12 November, confirmation of landing is expected on Earth at around 16:00 GMT/17:00 CET.

Live coverage of the key Go/No-Go decisions during the night of 11–12 November and of events through the day on 12 November will be provided by ESA TV, on the homepages of all partners, and on Twitter (#CometLanding). Press briefings each day either side of landing day will also be streamed live on the Internet at www.esa.int/rosetta and www.dlr.de

More about Rosetta
Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its Member States and NASA. Rosetta’s Philae lander is provided by a consortium led by DLR, MPS, CNES and ASI. Rosetta is the first mission in history to rendezvous with a comet. It is escorting the comet as it orbits the Sun and will deploy a lander to its surface.


Farewell Agilkia  Dunno  hello whom  Hmm2  Agilkia | | |  Dunno

Wiki:
Three: symbol of plurality[edit]The basic symbol for plurality among the ancient Egyptians was the number three: even the way they wrote the word for "plurality" in hieroglyphics consisted of three vertical marks ( | | | ).
Triads of deities were also used in Egyptian religion to signify a complete system. Examples include references to the god Atum "when he was one and became three" when he gave birth to Shu and Tefnut, and the triad of Horus, Osiris, and Isis.[2]




http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_...lo_Agilkia

Agilkia | [sup]Bounce[/sup] | [sup]Bounce[/sup] |

?????\????? ?? ????\???? ?????? ?? ?????? (xaragna/Tili3na min Hofra/no'ra wa wi'i3na fi daHdiira)
We jumped out of the frying pan and into the fire (lit. we got out of a hole and fell down a slope)

http://arabic.desert-sky.net/colloq.html



Recall:
Land.
Not Land.




Quote:Three: symbol of plurality[edit]The basic symbol for plurality among the ancient Egyptians was the number three

It Sites itself.
Site: ‘J’

It Cites Itself.
Agilkia

Itza SIGHT itself.
Perihelion Cliff

Whatz in a name by any other Rosetta? Hmm2
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#70
Comet 67P is an odd Duck.

It not only may not be a comet at all, but it may not even be from our neck of the woods.


First measurements of comet’s water ratio

Article at:

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/...ater_ratio


Rosetta’s measurement of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio (D/H) measured in the water vapour around Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The measurements were made using ROSINA’s DFMS double focusing mass spectrometer between 8 August and 5 September 2014.

Deuterium is an isotope of hydrogen with an added neutron. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in water is a key diagnostic to determining where in the Solar System an object originated and in what proportion asteroids and/or comets contributed to Earth’s oceans.



[Image: D-Graph_zps49044547.jpg]


67P is on the extreme right on the graph and indicates characteristics unlike any other objects in the solar system.
It even appears to have been a stranger to our observed place of  its origin, a Jupiter family comet.







Mellow
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.<br />Aldous Huxley
Reply
#71
Rosetta’s Comet Really “Blows Up” in Latest Images

by Jason Major  on February 9, 2015

[Image: Comet67P_NavCamFeb3-580x305.jpg]
Jet activity on Comet 67P/C-G imaged on Jan. 31 and Feb. 3, 2015. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0. Edit by Jason Major.

Quote:First off: no, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is not about to explode or disintegrate. But as it steadily gets nearer to the Sun the comet’s jets are getting more and more active and they’re putting on quite a show for the orbiting Rosetta spacecraft! Click the image for a jeterrific hi-res version.

The images above were captured by Rosetta’s NavCam on Jan. 31 and Feb. 3 from a distance of about 28 km (17 miles). Each is a mosaic of four separate NavCam acquisitions and they have been adjusted and tinted in Photoshop by yours truly to further enhance the jets’ visibility. (You can view the original image mosaics and source frames here and here.)

These dramatic views are just a hint at what’s in store; 67P’s activity will only be increasing in the coming weeks and months and, this weekend, Rosetta will be swooping down for an extreme close pass over its surface!

[Image: Comet67P_NavCamFeb3-crop-250x250.jpg]
Detail of 67P from the Feb. 3 NavCam image

This Saturday, Feb. 14, Rosetta will be performing a very close pass of the comet’s nucleus, soaring over the Imhotep region at an altitude of only 6 km (3.7 miles) at 12:41 UTC. This will allow the spacecraft to closely image the comet’s surface, as well as investigate the behavior of its jets and how they interact with its developing coma.

“The upcoming close flyby will allow unique scientific observations, providing us with high-resolution measurements of the surface over a range of wavelengths and giving us the opportunity to sample – taste or sniff – the very innermost parts of the comet’s atmosphere,” said Rosetta project scientist Matt Taylor.

Read more about Rosetta’s Valentine’s Day close pass here and watch an animation of how it will be executed below.
[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/dxF2wE24hCI[/flash]





The rest of the story...so far

Rosetta swoops in for a close encounter

[Image: Rosetta_s_closest_approach_medium.jpg]
Rosetta’s closest approach

Quote:4 February 2015
ESA’s Rosetta probe is preparing to make a close encounter with its comet on 14 February, passing just 6 km from the surface.

Yesterday was Rosetta’s last day at 26 km from Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, marking the end of the current orbiting period and the start of a new phase for the rest of this year.

Today, Rosetta is moving into a new path ahead of a very close encounter next week. First, it will move out to a distance of roughly 140 km from the comet by 7 February, before swooping in for the close encounter at 12:41 GMT (13:41 CET) on 14 February. The closest pass occurs over the comet’s larger lobe, above the Imhotep region.


“The upcoming close flyby will allow unique scientific observations, providing us with high-resolution measurements of the surface over a range of wavelengths and giving us the opportunity to sample – taste or sniff – the very innermost parts of the comet’s atmosphere,” says Matt Taylor, ESA’s Rosetta project scientist.

The flyby will take Rosetta over the most active regions of the comet, helping scientists to understand the connection between the source of the observed activity and the atmosphere, or coma.


In particular, they will be looking for zones where the outflowing gas and dust accelerates from the surface and how these constituents evolve at larger distances from the comet.

The comet’s surface is already known to be very dark, reflecting just 6% of the light that falls on it. During the close flyby, Rosetta will pass over the comet with the Sun directly behind, allowing shadow-free images to be collected. By studying the reflectivity of the nucleus as it varies with the angle of the sunlight falling on it, scientists hope to gain a more detailed insight into the dust grains on the surface.

“After this close flyby, a new phase will begin, when Rosetta will execute sets of flybys past the comet at a range of distances, between about 15 km and 100 km,” says Sylvain Lodiot, ESA’s spacecraft operations manager.

It was always planned to change from ‘bound orbits’ to flyby trajectories at this point in the mission, based on predictions of increasing cometary activity. The range of flyby distances also balances the various needs of Rosetta’s 11 instruments in order to optimise the mission’s scientific return.

During some of the close flybys, Rosetta will encounter the comet almost in step with the rotation, allowing the instruments to monitor a single point on the surface as it passes by.

Meanwhile, the more distant flybys will provide the broader context of a wide-angle view of the nucleus and its growing coma.http://www.universetoday.com/118901/rosettas-comet-really-blows-up-in-latest-images/



“We’re in the main science phase of the mission now, so throughout the year we’ll be continuing with high-resolution mapping of the comet,” says Matt.

“We’ll sample the gas, dust and plasma from a range of distances as the comet’s activity increases and then subsides again later in the year.”

Perihelion, closest approach to the Sun, occurs on 13 August when the comet and Rosetta will be 186 million kilometres from the Sun, between the orbits of Earth and Mars.

[Image: Comet_on_22_January_2015_NavCam_medium.jpg]
Comet on 22 January 2015 – NavCam

In the month before perihelion, as activity is reaching a peak, the team are planning to study one of the comet’s jets in greater detail than ever.

“We hope to target one of these regions for a fly-through, to really get a taste of the outflow of the comet,” adds Matt.

After perihelion and once the comet’s activity begins to subside, the mission team will determine if and when to return to a bound orbit around the comet, and how long Rosetta might be able to operate beyond the end of 2015.
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_..._encounter

Osiris is making a pass @ a 67P's Ices/ISIS on valentines day. Rotatingheart

Can a Comet turn red??? and blush  Hmm2







Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#72
Rosetta space probe takes sharp, close-up images of comet

2 hours ago

[Image: rosettaspace.jpg]
Four-image montage of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comprising images taken on 14 February 2015 during the first dedicated close flyby. This image set was taken at 10:32 GMT from a distance of 12.6 km from the comet centre, or about 10.6 km from the surface seen in the foreground. Using the surface distance, the image scale is 0.9 m/pixel and the montage measures about 1.8 km across. Closest approach of about 6 km from the comet’s surface took place at 12:41 GMT.

Quote:The European Space Agency says high-resolution images the Rosetta space probe took during a swoop close to a comet it's been tracking for months show boulders on the comet's surface as well as "stunning details of the contrasting terrain."

The agency said Monday the boulders ranged in size from a few meters (yards) to a few tens of meters, and lie "scattered across the whole surface of the comet." It says the sun was directly behind Rosetta as the pictures were taken, providing optimal light conditions.

While swooping in as close as 6 kilometers (under 4 miles) Saturday to take the pictures, Rosetta's instruments also sampled the innermost parts of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's atmosphere.

Rosetta, which has been alongside the comet since August, is now moving out to take far-view images.

[Image: 1-rosettaspace.jpg]
Four-image mosaic of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comprising images taken on 14 February 2015 during the first dedicated close flyby. This image set was taken at 14:15 GMT from a distance of 8.9 km from the surface. The image scale is 0.76 m/pixel and the mosaic measures 1.35 × 1.37 km. Closest approach of about 6 km from the comet’s surface took place at 12:41 GMT. Credit: ESA

[Image: 2-rosettaspace.jpg]
Four-image montage of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comprising images taken on 14 February 2015 during the first dedicated close flyby. This image set was taken at 4:32 GMT from a distance of 35.0 km. The image scale is 3.0 m/pixel and the montage measures about 6.1 km across. Closest approach of about 6 km from the comet’s surface took place at 12:41 GMT. Credit: ESA

Where's Waldo? ...I mean Philae? Dunno
http://phys.org/news/2015-02-rosetta-spa...se-up.html
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#73
Damned Damn I nearly forgot about Philae!!!

[b]The mission teams soon discovered that Philae not only touched down once at Agilkia, but also came into contact with the comet's surface four times in fact – including a grazing collision with a surface feature that sent it tumbling towards the final touchdown point at Abydos.
[/b]

Abydos

That is the name of Philae's resting place  Mellow


Comet springs surprise: Rosetta and Philae find Comet 67P not magnetised

5 hours ago

[Image: 552cef8434c63.jpg]
Magnetic field data collected by Philae’s ROMAP instrument immediately before (top) and after (bottom) the cliff collision at 16:20 GMT on 12 November 2014 (onboard spacecraft time), between the first and second touchdowns. Height above the surface is plotted on the x-axis and magnetic field strength on the y-axis. Therefore time runs left-to-right for the ascent (lower) plot, but right-to-left for the descent (upper) plot. The measurements (crosses) are compared with a hypothetical model (solid line) assuming a slightly magnetized surface. Also included is the strength of and variation in the external field, namely the influence of the solar wind interplanetary magnetic field near the comet nucleus. At distances of 10 m or greater from the surface, the surface component would be very weak, leaving just the external field, as measured. But closer to the surface, the comet’s own field should increase and dominate. That is not seen, therefore the data suggest that at scales of greater than one meter (the resolution of the instrument), the comet is not magnetized. Credit: ESA / Data: Auster et al. (2015) / Background comet image: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

Quote:Measurements made by Rosetta and Philae during the probe's multiple landings on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko show that the comet's nucleus is not magnetised.

Studying the properties of a comet can provide clues to the role that magnetic fields played in the formation of Solar System bodies almost 4.6 billion years ago. The infant Solar System was once nothing more than a swirling disc of gas and dust but, within a few million years, the Sun burst into life in the centre of this turbulent disc, with the leftover material going into forming the asteroids, comets, moons and planets.

The dust contained an appreciable fraction of iron, some of it in the form of magnetite. Indeed, millimetre-sized grains of magnetic materials have been found in meteorites, indicating their presence in the early Solar System.

This leads scientists to believe that magnetic fields threading through the proto-planetary disc could have played an important role in moving material around as it started to clump together to form larger bodies.

But it remains unclear as to how crucial magnetic fields were later on in this accretion process, as the building blocks grew to centimetres, metres and then tens of metres across, before gravity started to dominate when they grew to hundreds of metres and kilometres in scale.

Some theories concerning the aggregation of magnetic and non-magnetic dust particles show that the resulting bigger objects could also remain magnetised, allowing them to also be influenced by the magnetic fields of the proto-planetary disc.

Because comets contain some of the most pristine materials in the Solar System, they offer a natural laboratory for investigating whether or not these larger chunks could have remained magnetised.

However, detecting the magnetic field of comets has proven difficult in previous missions, which have typically made rapid flybys, relatively far from comet nuclei.

It has taken the proximity of ESA's Rosetta orbiter to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and the measurements made much closer to and at the surface by its lander Philae, to provide the first detailed investigation of the magnetic properties of a comet nucleus.

[Image: 552cef931a2e8.jpg]
Magnetic field data from ROMAP on Philae, combined with information from the CONSERT experiment that provided an estimate of the final landing region, timing information, images from Rosetta’s OSIRIS camera, assumptions about the gravity of the comet, and measurements of its shape, have been used to reconstruct the trajectory of the lander during its descent and subsequent landings on and bounces over the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November 2014. The times are as recorded by the spacecraft; the confirmation signals arrived on Earth 28 minutes later. Initially, Philae was seen to rotate slowly during the descent to Agilkia. It landed and then bounced, rotating significantly faster as the momentum of the internal flywheel was transferred to the lander. It collided with a cliff 45 minutes later, then tumbled, flying above the surface for more than an hour longer, before bouncing once again and coming to a stop a few meters away, a few minutes later. The position of the first touchdown point at Agilkia is very well determined from direct images, but the locations of the possible cliff collision depends on the ballistic model used, while the general location marked for the subsequent second and third touchdowns at Abydos come from the CONSERT measurements. Thus, these latter positions represent preliminary and approximate locations only. The heights above the surface assume a reference sphere centered on the center of mass of the comet and with a radius of 2393 m reaching first touchdown point. Credit: ESA / Data: Auster et al. (2015) / Comet image: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Philae's magnetic field measuring instrument is the Rosetta Lander Magnetometer and Plasma Monitor (ROMAP), while Rosetta carries a magnetometer as part of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium suite of sensors (RPC-MAG).

Changes in the magnetic field surrounding Rosetta allowed RPC-MAG to detect the moment when Philae was deployed in the morning of 12 November 2014.

Then, by sensing periodic variations in the measured external magnetic field and motions in its boom arm, ROMAP was able to detect the touchdown events and determine the orientation of Philae over the following hours. Combined with information from the CONSERT experiment that provided an estimate of the final landing site location, timing information, images from Rosetta's OSIRIS camera, assumptions about the gravity of the comet, and measurements of its shape, it was possible to determine Philae's trajectory.

The mission teams soon discovered that Philae not only touched down once at Agilkia, but also came into contact with the comet's surface four times in fact – including a grazing collision with a surface feature that sent it tumbling towards the final touchdown point at Abydos.

This complex trajectory turned out to be scientifically beneficial to the ROMAP team.

"The unplanned flight across the surface actually meant we could collect precise magnetic field measurements with Philae at the four points we made contact with, and at a range of heights above the surface," says Hans-Ulrich Auster, co-principal investigator of ROMAP and lead author of the results published in the journal Science and presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, today.

The multiple descents and ascents meant that the team could compare measurements made on the inward and outward journeys to and from each contact point, and as it flew across the surface.

[Image: cometsprings.jpg]
Complementary data collected by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium fluxgate magnetometer (RPCMAG) on board the orbiter (top) and the Rosetta Lander Magnetometer and Plasma Monitor (ROMAP) on board the lander (bottom) have been used to investigate the magnetic properties of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The pictures on the left indicate the positions of the two instruments on the orbiter and lander, respectively. The graph on the right shows the data collected by the instruments. Note that to better see the complementary nature of the two data sets, the RPC-MAG data have been shifted up by 10 nT. The data shown cover the period immediately prior to the second touchdown of Philae at 17:25 GMT (onboard lander time) on 12 November 2014. The first touchdown was recorded at 15:34 GMT, the collision at 16:20 GMT, and the final touchdown at 17:31 GMT. Credit: ESA / Data: Auster et al. (2015) / Spacecraft: ESA/ATG medialab

ROMAP measured a magnetic field during these sequences, but found that its strength did not depend on the height or location of Philae above the surface. This is not consistent with the nucleus itself being responsible for that field.

"If the surface was magnetised, we would have expected to see a clear increase in the magnetic field readings as we got closer and closer to the surface," explains Hans-Ulrich.  "But this was not the case at any of the locations we visited, so we conclude that Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a remarkably non-magnetic object."

Instead, the magnetic field that was measured was consistent with an external one, namely the influence of the solar wind interplanetary magnetic field near the comet nucleus.  This conclusion is confirmed by the fact that variations in the field that were measured by Philae closely agree with those seen at the same time by Rosetta.

"During Philae's landing, Rosetta was about 17 km above the surface, and we could provide complementary magnetic field readings that rule out any local magnetic anomalies in the comet's surface materials," says Karl-Heinz Glassmeier, principal investigator of RPC-MAG on board the orbiter and a co-author of the Science paper.

If large chunks of material on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were magnetised, ROMAP would have recorded additional variations in its signal as Philae flew over them.

"If any material is magnetised, it must be on a scale of less than one metre, below the spatial resolution of our measurements. And if Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is representative of all cometary nuclei, then we suggest that magnetic forces are unlikely to have played a role in the accumulation of planetary building blocks greater than one metre in size," concludes Hans-Ulrich.

"It's great to see the complementary nature of Rosetta and Philae's measurements, working together to answer this simple, but important 'yes-no' question as to whether the comet is magnetised," says Matt Taylor, ESA's Rosetta project scientist.

Yes/No  (50/50)

EA: « Reply #1 on: November 09, 2014, 06:31:10 PM »
Land?  Dunno Not?


More information: The nonmagnetic nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Science , www.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10.1126/science.aaa5102  http://www.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10....ce.aaa5102

Journal reference:  Science  Provided by  European Space Agency
http://phys.org/news/2015-04-comet-roset...d.html#jCp 
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Reply
#74
(11-10-2014, 12:33 AM)EA link Wrote:Wook  said he wouldn't hold his breath on improv until EYE showed him "...a couple molecules..."  Reefer
just kidding. 

http://keithlaney.net/SMF/index.php?topic=15630.0 

(11-10-2014, 01:07 AM)Wook link Wrote:just a couple
Whistle
Rofl





[move]Scientists hold breath for comet lander to wake  Reefer[/move]

19 minutes ago



[Image: philae.jpg]
Model of Philae lander. Credit: Wikipedia.

Quote:Europe's comet lander Philae has remained obstinately silent since a new bid was launched to communicate with it, mission chiefs said Tuesday, but chances for contact were improving daily.

Philae's orbiting mothership Rosetta reopened communications lines on Sunday to listen for any call from the little robot, project manager Stephan Ulamec told reporters at a meeting of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) in Vienna.

"At the moment the orbiter is in listening mode again," he said.

"We are waiting to get a signal, but yesterday and today so far we did not hear anything."

Rosetta lowered Philae onto the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12 last year.

But instead of harpooning itself onto the dusty iceball's surface, the washing machine-sized lab bounced several times before settling at an angle in a dark ditch.

Philae had enough stored battery power for 60 hours of experiments. It sent home reams of data before going into standby mode on November 15.

As "67P" draws closer to the Sun, scientists hope better light will recharge Philae's solar-powered batteries enough for it to wake up, then make contact, and ultimately carry out a new series of experiments.

A previous contact attempt, from March 12-18, was unsuccessful.

"There is a chance to boot (the lander's computers) probably in the April-May timeframe," Ulamec said.

"If we also want to communicate, and of course we want to do this, it's May-June the most realistic dates for wakeup."

But the window is shrinking. By August 13 the comet will reach its closest point to the Sun, or perihelion, before veering off again into the deeper reaches of space.

"If it is August 14th and we still didn't wake up, then probably (it) will not wake up any more," Ulamec told AFP.

Hear it immediately

The Rosetta team said they have a far better idea by now of where Philae ended up—within an area of about 30 by 50 metres (98 by 164 feet).

But they have still not been able to spot it on photos taken with Rosetta's onboard OSIRIS camera, nor do they know if it is upright.

Philae has to warm to at least about minus 45 degrees Celsius (minus 49 Fahrenheit) to wake up.

Once it does boot up, the lander would try to make contact with Rosetta once about every 35 minutes.

The team "may consider" simply keeping the line open from here on, said Ulamec, "so whenever the lander is woken up... we will hear it immediately."

Last month, Rosetta battled breakdowns in navigation and communication with Earth after flying through blasts of dust and gas as it approached within 14 kilometres (nine miles) of the surface of the comet.

ESA announced at the time it would not venture so close again, and the orbiter is now about 100 km from the 67P.

"We are trying to find how close we can get basically. That's the situation we're in, to step a bit closer and a bit closer week by week and then see what the situation is," Rosetta project scientist Matthew Taylor said Tuesday.

"In the near term, we've lost some of the close observations. One thing we were planning to do was a lot more of these close flybys, but at the moment they are deemed to be not possible," he said.

"We are looking at what can be done to mitigate this. It will become clearer in the next months what we can do."

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-scientists-...r.html#jCp 

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#75
right where we left off...


The mission teams soon discovered that Philae not only touched down once at [b]Agilkia
, but also came into contact with the comet's surface four times in fact – including a grazing collision with a surface feature that sent it tumbling towards the final touchdown point at Abydos.
[/b]



Fred Jansen: How to land on a comet

Quote:Published on Apr 9, 2015


As manager of the Rosetta mission, Fred Jansen was responsible for the successful 2014 landing of a probe on the comet known as 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In this fascinating and funny talk, Jansen reveals some of the intricate calculations that went into landing the Philae probe on a comet 500 million kilometers from Earth — and shares some incredible photographs taken along the way.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/talks/fred_jansen_...

[flash=555,333]https://www.youtube.com/v/h27g5iT0tck[/flash]
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#76
European Geosciences Union

General Assembly 2015

Vienna | Austria | 13 – 17 April 2015 | Webstreams
http://client.cntv.at/egu2015/PC1

EGU.eu      PC1 - Press Conference 1



Latest results from the ESA Rosetta mission

https://www.youtube.com/user/EuroGeosciencesUnion


Not uploded to Youtube yet.
WATCH:
Quote:[move]  http://client.cntv.at/egu2015/PC1[/move]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
With a forked tongue the snake singsss...
Reply
#77
Fred Jansen: How to land on a comet(shaped like a spinning duck? Dunno)



:duck:

The Unusual Suspect shows up...  Damned

[Image: DuckTales_(Main_title).jpg]

Suspect Drake Awake Profile:
[Image: 17151570652_5b283026f7_o.jpg]
right where we left off...

A post comments tale of a Comet's Tail...

[move]http://keithlaney.net/SMF/index.php?topic=15630.60[/move]

[Image: ele-kelvinwake-2.png]

[move]:duck: wave function Hi QUACK!!! QUACK!!! QUACK!!! A post comments tale of a Comet's Tail...
[/move]
incomming duck!!!

An Induct Tale/ In Duck Tail/In the details of the tape(METRIC)snake scales on grapes
[Image: 16531259354_1090b2a92a_o.jpg]
There is a sphere of reckoning where they have summarised data.

By any reasonable approximation and common sense tail measure 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko =  ~3.33 km

[move][Image: 16967412519_a07abd4dbb_o.jpg]a duck tale...  ~3.33km [/move]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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Reply
#78
(11-30-2014, 01:56 AM)EA link Wrote:Mayito...
What if Philae "Relocates"

Actually loses its tenuos grip and without harpooned cable-tows, repositions itself.

It may yet just jet to a new locale...ya never know since this is a quantum thread.

[Image: 271F05AA00000578-3017232-image-a-20_1427670839417.jpg]

When the sun enters the scene things may or may not change.
depends on pov. That was my first post after post #5050

[Image: 265E408F00000578-2982450-image-m-6_1425638770771.jpg]

[sup] EA
Non Official Cover

Posts: 5051
Mojo: 13

[/sup]
50/50  Reefer
[sub]« Reply #55 on: Today at 09:56:17 PM »[/sub]

Yesterday = day [sup]333[/sup] don't gamble with improv. Rover Today = day [sub]334[/sub]
[move]50 [glow=red,2,300]Here is / There Was[/glow] a "Schrödinger's Cat" 50[/move]


It ex-cites itself
http://keithlaney.net/SMF/index.php?topic=15707.0
[move]Maybe 67p will split in two and be 50/50  Rofl Rofl Rofl[/move]
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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Reply
#79
New bid to contact Europe's comet probe

Don't Gamble With Improv.

7 hours ago

[Image: 2-handoutpictu.jpg]
Handout picture by the European Space Agency on December 20, 2013 of an artist's impression of Rosetta's lander Philae on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko




Europe will launch a new bid Friday to communicate with its comet lander Philae, hurtling towards the Sun some 360 million kilometres (224 million miles) from Earth, ground operators said.

Quote:Philae's orbiting mothership Rosetta will reopen communications lines for 10 days to listen for any call from the slumbering robot, Paris-based Rosetta project manager Francis Rocard of France's CNES space agency told AFP on Thursday.

Chances for contact improve daily as comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko draws closer to the Sun and its battery-replenishing rays, though the orientation of Philae's solar panels is unknown.
There had been two previous, unsuccessful attempts, in March and April, to contact the washing machine-sized probe, which fell silent three days after touching down on "67P" last November.
"We will listen anew from May 8-17," Rocard told AFP, but added a note of caution: "We cannot say with 100 percent certainty that it will wake up."
The 100-kilogramme (220-pound) robot lab touched down on the comet on November 12 after a 10-year trek piggybacking on its mother ship, Rosetta.
But instead of harpooning itself onto the dusty iceball's surface, Philae bounced several times before settling at an angle in a dark ditch.
The little lander had enough stored battery power for 60 hours of experiments, and sent home reams of data before going into standby mode on November 15.
As "67P" draws closer to the Sun, scientists hope better light will recharge Philae's batteries enough for it to reboot, then make contact, and ultimately carry out a new series of experiments.
But the window is shrinking.
By August 13 the comet will reach its closest point to the Sun, or perihelion, before veering off again into the deeper reaches of space.
If Philae hadn't woken up by August 14, it probably won't.
It's location on the surface of the dusty iceball has been narrowed down to an area of about 30 by 50 metres (98 by 164 feet). But Rosetta's cameras have not yet spotted the probe, and scientists don't know if it is upright.
Philae has to warm to at least about minus 45 degrees Celsius (minus 49 Fahrenheit) to wake up.
"Spring has sprung on the comet. The days are getting longer," Rosetta operations head Philippe Gaudon of CNES in Toulouse in the south of France.
"We hope to get about two or two-and-a-half hours of sunlight per day," for Philae.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Scientists hold breath for comet lander to wake


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-05-contact-eur...e.html#jCp




Jump up^
http://www.keithlaney.net/THMF/showthread.php?tid=6749


May 6/7p split intuit as it approaches Sol.(333)
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Reply
#80
Quote:"Hello Earth! Can you hear me?" - Philae



Philae comet lander wakes up
[Image: BBl7Gl2.img?h=112&w=200&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f]
The European Space Agency (Esa) says its comet lander, Philae, has woken up and contacted Earth.

Philae, the first spacecraft to land on a comet, was dropped on to the surface of Comet 67P by its mothership, Rosetta, last November.

It worked for 60 hours before its solar-powered battery ran flat.

The comet has since moved nearer to the sun and Philae has enough power to work again, says the BBC's science correspondent Jonathan Amos.

The probe tweeted the message, "Hello Earth! Can you hear me?"
On its blog, Esa said that Philae contacted Earth, via Rosetta, for 85 seconds in the first contact since going into hibernation in November.

"Philae is doing very well. It has an operating temperature of -35C and has 24 watts available," said Philae project manager Stephan Ulamec.

Scientists say they now waiting for the next contact.

Analysis: Jonathan Amos, BBC science correspondent

When Philae first sent back images of its landing location, researchers could see it was in a dark ditch. The Sun was obscured by a high wall, limiting the amount of light that could reach the robot's solar panels. Scientists knew they only had a limited amount of time - about 60 hours - to gather data before the robot's battery ran flat.

But the calculations also indicated that Philae's mission might not be over for good when the juice did eventually run dry. The comet is currently moving in towards the Sun, and the intensity of light falling on Philae, engineers suggested, could be sufficient in time to re-boot the machine.

And so it has proved. There is some relief also, because the very low temperatures endured by the lander in recent months could have done irreparable damage to some of the circuitry. The fact that both the computer and transmitter have fired up indicate that the engineering has stood up remarkably well to what must have been really quite extreme conditions. Scientists must now hope they can get enough power into Philae to carry out a full range of experiments.

One ambition not fulfilled before the robot went to sleep was to try to drill into the comet, to examine its chemical make-up. This will become a priority,

Philae is designed to analyse ice and rock on the comet.

The Rosetta probe took 10 years to reach the comet, and the lander - about the size of a washing-machine - bounced at least a kilometre when it touched down.

Before it lost power, Philae sent images of its surroundings which showed it was in a type of ditch with high walls blocking sunlight from its solar panels.

Its exact location on the comet has since been a mystery.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology...id=U220DHP
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#81
Exhale... Philae is awake on itz new horizon.



Rosetta team spots glint of light that could be comet lander


Jun 11, 2015

[Image: rosettateams.png]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.png
Zooming in towards the current CONSERT ellipse, a number of bright dots are seen in the region. As only one (at most) of these could be the lander, the majority must be associated with surface features on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

The European Space Agency says it may have caught a glimpse of its missing comet lander.

Philae became the first spacecraft land on a comet, but its exact location has been a mystery since it touched down on the surface of 67P in November.
ESA said Thursday that scientists analyzed images and other data from the lander and mother ship Rosetta. They identified several possible locations including one bright spot described as "a good candidate for the lander."
Rosetta was unable to fly by the site for a closer look since December because the comet is releasing gas and dust as it nears the sun in the next months.
Chances of finding Philae will be boosted if the lander gathers enough solar energy to wake up and send a signal.



This movie shows a zoom into the 13 December 2015 OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image taken from a distance of about 20 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G. A large number of bright spots are seen: as only one (at most) of them could be Philae, the majority must be associated with surface features on the comet nucleus. The movie ends on a promising candidate located just outside the CONSERT error ellipse (marked): this candidate was not seen in 22 October images, but appears in images taken on both 12 and 13 December. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


[Image: 1-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
Before’ and ‘after’ comparison images of a promising candidate located near the CONSERT ellipse as seen in images from the OSIRIS Narrow-Angle Camera. Each box covers roughly 20 x 20 m on Comet 67P/C-G. The left-hand image shows the region as seen on 22 October (before the landing of Philae) from a distance of about 10 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G, while the centre and right-hand images shows the same region on 12 and 13 December from 20 km (after landing). The candidate is only seen in the two later images. The illumination conditions are broadly similar in the three images and the same topography can be recognised in each case. The difference in distance at which the images were taken yields a difference in resolution and thus the December images have been resampled and interpolated to match the scale of the October image. As a result, the candidate covers more pixels calculated for a Philae-sized object seen by the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera from a distance of 18 km to the surface. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


[Image: 2-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
The current 16 x 160 m CONSERT ellipse overlaid on an OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image of the same region. The location and size of the ellipse is not accurate at the pixel level, and may also change as further CONSERT data analysis proceeds and more detailed comet shape models become available. The OSIRIS image is a slightly cropped 2 x 2 mosaic of NAC images taken from a distance of approximately 18 km from the surface of the comet on 13 December 2014. At this distance, the resolution of NAC is approximately 34 cm per pixel, and the full mosaic covers roughly 1.3 km. Credit: Ellipse: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CONSERT; Image: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA



[Image: 3-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:   http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
Approximate locations of five lander candidates initially identified in high-resolution OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera images taken in December 2014, from a distance of about 20 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G. The candidates are circled in the close-ups, identifying Philae-sized features approximately 1–2 m across. The contrast has been stretched in some of the images to better reveal the candidates. All but one of these candidates (top left) have subsequently been ruled out of consideration due to constraints including the reconstructed lander trajectory and topography at the landing site. The candidate at top left lies near to the current CONSERT ellipse. Credit: Centre image: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0; insets: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Europe's Rosetta craft swoops for close look at comet
More information: blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/06/11/the-quest-to-find-philae-2/


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-rosetta-tea...r.html#jCp
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Reply
#82
Quote: Wrote:"Hello Earth! Can you hear me?" - Philae

[Image: 18660598368_728dcee964_o.jpg]

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/philae-comet-lander-wakes-up/ar-BBl7mpk?ocid=U220DHP
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#83
http://blogs.channel4.com/tom-clarke-on-...anned/1862

Sunday 14 Jun 2015 Why Philae’s long sleep could be even better than planned
Quote:For the scientists who worked for decades to land a robot on a speeding comet, getting there was exciting enough. But now they’ve re-established contact with their probe – missing, believed dead for seven months – they now find themselves at the centre of the greatest comeback story in the history of robots in space.
There was jubilation when Philae touched down on the surface of comet 67-P on November 12th last year. This was by far the riskiest space landing in the history of solar system exploration.
[Image: GettyImages-458856512-1024x489.jpg]

But it was short-lived. When the data started to come back they realised their lander hadn’t initially landed. In the comet’s microgravity it had bounced several times before landing the right way up – but a long way from its planned landing site in the shadow of a cliff. With no sunlight falling on its solar panels, Philae carried out 60 hours-worth of experiments on battery power, before shutting itself down.
Mission managers hoped that as the comet approached the Sun, the amount of light reaching the probe might allow it to re-boot. But many were pessimistic, especially as it had spent months freezing in the dark.
But at 10.30 last night Philae phoned home. It began sending back thousands of packets of data it acquired before it shut down which will give scientists much to work on. If the conditions on the comet stay the same, they hope to carry out many of the experiments they had to abandon when they lost the lander.
They want to use Philae’s drill to dig into the comet’s surface and analyse it for the types of molecules that may have kick-started life on our own planet. They also want to use the probe to receive radio pulses fired through the comet from its mother-ship the Rosetta orbiter.
[Image: GettyImages-458856938.jpg]
This will give them the first interior view of a comet — some of the most mysterious objects in the solar system.
And Philae’s enforced hibernation might even be to their advantage, say mission scientists.
If the probe had worked as planned, it probably would have overheated and died by now.
By waking up after seven months it will hopefully be doing experiments as Comet 67-p is closest to the Sun – the most interesting time in a comet’s life. They now have to opportunity to learn even more than they hoped.
Follow Tom Clarke on Twitter: @tomclarkeC4
Never invite a Yoda to a frog leg dinner.
Go ahead invite Yoda to a Frog leg dinner
Reply
#84
Quote:"It began sending back thousands of packets of data it acquired before it shut down..."


More data than:

"couple molecules..."

Quote:Improv is as is was 


Levin will have his Day. 
Wickramasinghe?
Along the vines of the Vineyard.
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Reply
#85
(06-14-2015, 08:09 PM)EA Wrote: Exhale... Philae is awake on itz new horizon.

[Image: rooster-crowing-2.jpg]

Rosetta team spots glint of light that could be comet lander


Jun 11, 2015




[Image: rosettateams.png]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.png
Zooming in towards the current CONSERT ellipse, a number of bright dots are seen in the region. As only one (at most) of these could be the lander, the majority must be associated with surface features on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

The European Space Agency says it may have caught a glimpse of its missing comet lander.

Philae became the first spacecraft land on a comet, but its exact location has been a mystery since it touched down on the surface of 67P in November.
ESA said Thursday that scientists analyzed images and other data from the lander and mother ship Rosetta. They identified several possible locations including one bright spot described as "a good candidate for the lander."
Rosetta was unable to fly by the site for a closer look since December because the comet is releasing gas and dust as it nears the sun in the next months.
Chances of finding Philae will be boosted if the lander gathers enough solar energy to wake up and send a signal.



This movie shows a zoom into the 13 December 2015 OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image taken from a distance of about 20 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G. A large number of bright spots are seen: as only one (at most) of them could be Philae, the majority must be associated with surface features on the comet nucleus. The movie ends on a promising candidate located just outside the CONSERT error ellipse (marked): this candidate was not seen in 22 October images, but appears in images taken on both 12 and 13 December. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


[Image: 1-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
Before’ and ‘after’ comparison images of a promising candidate located near the CONSERT ellipse as seen in images from the OSIRIS Narrow-Angle Camera. Each box covers roughly 20 x 20 m on Comet 67P/C-G. The left-hand image shows the region as seen on 22 October (before the landing of Philae) from a distance of about 10 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G, while the centre and right-hand images shows the same region on 12 and 13 December from 20 km (after landing). The candidate is only seen in the two later images. The illumination conditions are broadly similar in the three images and the same topography can be recognised in each case. The difference in distance at which the images were taken yields a difference in resolution and thus the December images have been resampled and interpolated to match the scale of the October image. As a result, the candidate covers more pixels calculated for a Philae-sized object seen by the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera from a distance of 18 km to the surface. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


[Image: 2-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
The current 16 x 160 m CONSERT ellipse overlaid on an OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image of the same region. The location and size of the ellipse is not accurate at the pixel level, and may also change as further CONSERT data analysis proceeds and more detailed comet shape models become available. The OSIRIS image is a slightly cropped 2 x 2 mosaic of NAC images taken from a distance of approximately 18 km from the surface of the comet on 13 December 2014. At this distance, the resolution of NAC is approximately 34 cm per pixel, and the full mosaic covers roughly 1.3 km. Credit: Ellipse: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CONSERT; Image: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA



[Image: 3-rosettateams.jpg]
ZOOM:   http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/hire...ateams.jpg
Approximate locations of five lander candidates initially identified in high-resolution OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera images taken in December 2014, from a distance of about 20 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G. The candidates are circled in the close-ups, identifying Philae-sized features approximately 1–2 m across. The contrast has been stretched in some of the images to better reveal the candidates. All but one of these candidates (top left) have subsequently been ruled out of consideration due to constraints including the reconstructed lander trajectory and topography at the landing site. The candidate at top left lies near to the current CONSERT ellipse. Credit: Centre image: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0; insets: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Europe's Rosetta craft swoops for close look at comet
More information: blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/06/11/the-quest-to-find-philae-2/


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-rosetta-tea...r.html#jCp


Philae lander makes fresh contact from comet surface (Update)

Jun 15, 2015

Europe's robot lab Philae has called home once more, a day after sending its first message in seven months in its trek towards the Sun on the back of a comet, mission officals said Monday.

The lander re-established contact at 2122 GMT Sunday, nearly a day after a solar battery recharge roused it from hibernation, they said.
"We had another contact overnight. It wasn't very long, about five minutes," European Space Agency (ESA) senior science advisor Mark McCaughrean told AFP.
The connection was "pretty short and pretty faint," he said, but "we got some data down."
Philae landed on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12 after an epic 10-year trek piggybacking on its mothership Rosetta.
But instead of harpooning itself to the iceball's surface, the lander bounced several times before settling at an angle in the dark.


It had enough stored battery power for about 60 hours of experiments, enabling it to send home reams of data before going into standby mode.
The hope was that better light as the comet approaches the Sun would recharge Philae's batteries enough for it to reboot, make contact and ultimately resume scientific work.
The first word came on Saturday night—a two-minute connection with Earth via Rosetta during which Philae sent home about 40 seconds worth of data—some 300 of an estimated 8,000 data packets on board.
The lander is now "completely awake," head of French space agency CNES, Jean-Yves Le Gall, told France 2 television after the second contact.
McCaughrean explained that as the comet rotates every 12.5 hours, scientists had hoped for two contacts in the 24 hours after the first, but had only one.
"We missed one, then you begin to worry... was it just a random event?" he said.
When the signal finally came it was "a bit like when you have a very bad mobile signal and you see you have a signal on your phone but you're really not able to load any webpages, for example," the scientist said.
According to Philippe Gaudon, head of the Rosetta mission for CNES: "This time, Philae sent us less but more recent data."
Comet "67P" is now 215 million kilometres (134 million miles) from the Sun and 305 million km from Earth, racing at a speed of 31.24 km a second.
Weak signal
It is approaching perihelion, the closest point to the Sun in the comet's orbit, on August 13, after which "67P" will head off again into the deeper reaches of space.
The mission seeks to unlock the long-held secrets of comets—primordial clusters of ice and dust that scientists believe may reveal how the Solar System was formed.
Philae is equipped with 10 instruments with which to probe the enigma on the ground, and Rosetta, in orbit above, has a remote-sensing payload of 11.
McCaughrean said there were two possible reasons for the weak signal—Philae could be in a gully without a straight line of communication to Rosetta, but also the fact that the mothership has had to move away from the comet to avoid gas and dust blasting from its head.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-philae-come...t.html#jCp
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#86
Comet probe Philae dials home, 'doing very well' LilD  (Update)


Jun 19, 2015

[Image: thispicturer.jpg]
This picture released by the European Space Agency on December 20, 2013 shows an artist's impression of Rosetta's lander Philae on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Europe's robot lab Philae phoned home on Friday after several days silence in its journey towards the Sun on the back of a comet and is "doing very well", the German Aerospace Center (DLR) said.

The latest contact lasted 19 minutes and is the third time that Philae has touched base with Earth since it landed on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12 after piggybacking on its mothership Rosetta.
The mission seeks to unlock the long-held secrets of comets—primordial clusters of ice and dust that scientists believe may reveal how the Solar System was formed.
After landing on the comet, Philae had used its stored battery power to send home reams of data before going into standby mode.
The hope was that as the comet approaches the Sun, solar energy would recharge Philae's batteries enough for it to reboot, make contact and ultimately resume scientific work.


It finally took seven months before Philae woke up on June 13 from hibernation and made contact with Earth for two minutes. It reported back again just two days after that first contact.
On Friday, Philae transmitted 185 data packets back to Earth between 1320 and 1339 GMT.
"Among other things, we have received updated status information," Michael Maibaum, a systems engineer at the DLR Lander Control Center in Cologne.
"At present, the lander is operating at a temperature of zero degrees Celsius, which means that the battery is now warm enough to store energy. This means that Philae will also be able to work during the comet's night, regardless of solar illumination."
The data transmitted also shows that the amount of sunlight available had increased.
"More solar panels were illuminated; at the end of contact, four of Philae's panels were receiving energy," said the DLR statement.
"The contact has confirmed that Philae is doing very well," it added.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Rosetta team spots glint of light that could be comet lander


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-philae-come...p.html#jCp
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#87
That is amazing, ... resurrection from the dead, and doing very well.
Impressive, and great news.
Reply
#88
Exposed water ice detected on comet's surface

3 hours ago by Markus Bauer


[Image: exposedwater.jpg]
Ice on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Using the high-resolution science camera on board ESA's Rosetta spacecraft, scientists have identified more than a hundred patches of water ice a few metres in size on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Rosetta arrived at the comet in August 2014 at a distance of about 100 km and eventually orbited the comet at 10 km or less, allowing high-resolution images of the surface to be acquired.
A new study just published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics focuses on an analysis of bright patches of exposed ice on the comet's surface.
Based on observations of the gas emerging from comets, they are known to be rich in ices. As they move closer to the Sun along their orbits, their surfaces are warmed and the ices sublimate into gas, which streams away from the nucleus, dragging along dust particles embedded in the ice to form the coma and tail.

But some of the comet's dust also remains on the surface as the ice below sublimates, or falls back on to the nucleus elsewhere, coating it with a thin layer of dusty material and leaving very little ice directly exposed on the surface. These processes help to explain why Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and other comets seen in previous flyby missions are so dark.
Despite this, Rosetta's suite of instruments has already detected a variety of gases, including water vapour, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, thought to originate from frozen reservoirs below the surface.
Now, using images taken with Rosetta's OSIRIS narrow-angle camera last September, scientists have identified 120 regions on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that are up to ten times brighter than the average surface brightness.
Some of these bright features are found in clusters, while others appear isolated, and when observed at high resolution, many of them appear to be boulders displaying bright patches on their surfaces.


[Image: 1-exposedwater.jpg]
Icy clusters and individual boulders. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDAThe clusters of bright features, comprising a few tens of metre-sized boulders spread over several tens of metres, are typically found in debris fields at the base of cliffs. They are most likely the result of recent erosion or collapse of the cliff wall revealing fresher material from below the dust-covered surface.
By contrast, some of the isolated bright objects are found in regions without any apparent relation to the surrounding terrain. These are thought to be objects lifted up from elsewhere on the comet during a period of cometary activity, but with insufficient velocity to escape the gravitational pull of the comet completely.


In all cases, however, the bright patches were found in areas that receive relatively little solar energy, such as in the shadow of a cliff, and no significant changes were observed between images taken over a period of about a month. Furthermore, they were found to be bluer in colour at visible wavelengths compared with the redder background, consistent with an icy component.
"Water ice is the most plausible explanation for the occurrence and properties of these features," says Antoine Pommerol of the University of Bern and lead author of the study.
"At the time of our observations, the comet was far enough from the Sun such that the rate at which water ice would sublimate would have been less than 1 mm per hour of incident solar energy. By contrast, if carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide ice had been exposed, it would have rapidly sublimated when illuminated by the same amount of sunlight. Thus we would not expect to see that type of ice stable on the surface at this time."
The team also turned to laboratory experiments that tested the behaviour of water ice mixed with different minerals under simulated solar illumination in order to gain more insights into the process. They found that after a few hours of sublimation, a dark dust mantle a few millimetres thick was formed. In some places this acted to completely conceal any visible traces of the ice below, but occasionally larger dust grains or chunks would lift from the surface and move elsewhere, exposing bright patches of water ice.

[Image: 2-exposedwater.jpg]
Colour composites of icy bright patches on comet. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA"A 1 mm thick layer of dark dust is sufficient to hide the layers below from optical instruments," confirms Holger Sierks, OSIRIS principal investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen.
"The relatively homogeneous dark surface of the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, only punctuated by some metre-scale bright dots, can be explained by the presence of a thin dust mantle composed of refractory mineral and organic matter, with the bright spots corresponding to areas from which the dust mantle was removed, revealing a water-ice-rich subsurface below."
The team also speculates about the timing of the formation of the icy patches. One hypothesis is that they were formed at the time of the last closest approach of the comet to the Sun, 6.5 years ago, with icy blocks ejected into permanently shadowed regions, preserving them for several years below the peak temperature needed for sublimation.
Another idea is that even at relatively large distances from the Sun, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide driven-activity could eject the icy blocks. In this scenario, it is assumed that the temperature was not yet high enough for water sublimation, such that the water-ice-rich components outlive any exposed carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide ice.
"As the comet continues to approach perihelion, the increase in solar illumination onto the bright patches that were once in shadow should cause changes in their appearance, and we may expect to see new and even larger regions of exposed ice," says Matt Taylor, ESA's Rosetta project scientist.
"Combining OSIRIS observations made pre- and post-perihelion with other instruments will provide valuable insight into what drives the formation and evolution of such regions."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Rosetta's comet remains active after nightfall and emits dust jets into space
More information: "OSIRIS observations of meter-size exposures of H2O ice at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and interpretation using laboratory experiments." DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525977
Journal reference:Astronomy & Astrophysics [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided byEuropean Space Agency


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-exposed-ice...e.html#jCp
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#89
This is a quantum thread.

Quote:
Quote: Wrote: They found that after a few hours of sublimation, a dark dust mantle a few millimetres thick was formed. In some places this acted to completely conceal any visible traces of the ice below, but occasionally larger dust grains or chunks would lift from the surface and move elsewhere, exposing bright patches of water ice.

Monday, November 10th, 2014, 03:33 am (This post was last modified: Monday, November 10th, 2014, 03:53 am by agrorithms.)
Wook  said he wouldn't hold his breath on improv until EYE showed him "...a couple molecules..." [Image: reefer.gif]

just kidding.

The input comets make is non-reciprocal to any possible Osirian/jesus/grishnash output.
Therefore the osirian is clearly ceremonial and molecular / quantum interfacing of being scattered and returning like a molecular lost sheep/molecule.


In Duck Tails

Induct Tales.

Either or...

Jump Up^
:yyouareaduck:
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#90
Rosetta spacecraft sees sinkholes on comet

Jul 01, 2015

[Image: 3-rosettaspace.jpg]
This close-up image shows the most active pit, known as Seth_01, observed on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft. A new study suggests that this pit and others like it could be sinkholes, formed by a surface collapse process similar to the way these features form on Earth. Credit: Vincent et al., Nature Publishing Group

The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft first began orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. Almost immediately, scientists began to wonder about several surprisingly deep, almost perfectly circular pits on the comet's surface. Now, a new study based on close-up imagery taken by Rosetta suggests that these pits are sinkholes, formed when ices beneath the comet's surface sublimate, or turn directly to gas.

The study, which appears in the July 2, 2015 issue of the journal Nature, reveals that the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is variable and dynamic, undergoing rapid structural changes as it approaches the sun. Far from simple balls of ice and dust, comets have their own life cycles. The latest findings are among the first to show, in detail, how comets change over time.
"These strange, circular pits are just as deep as they are wide. Rosetta can peer right into them," said Dennis Bodewits, an assistant research scientist in astronomy at the University of Maryland who is a co-author on the study. The pits are large, ranging from tens of meters in diameter up to several hundred meters across.


"We propose that they are sinkholes, formed by a surface collapse process very similar to the way sinkholes form here on Earth," Bodewits added. Sinkholes occur on Earth when subsurface erosion removes a large amount of material beneath the surface, creating a cavern. Eventually the ceiling of the cavern will collapse under its own weight, leaving a sinkhole behind. "So we already have a library of information to help us understand how this process works, which allows us to use these pits to study what lies under the comet's surface," Bodewits said.

[Image: 4-rosettaspace.jpg]
This close-up image shows the most active pit, known as Seth_01, observed on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft. A new study suggests that this pit and others like it could be sinkholes, formed by a surface collapse process similar to the way these features form on Earth. Credit: Vincent et al., Nature Publishing Group

Bodewits and his co-authors analyzed images from Rosetta's Optical, Spectroscopic and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) narrow angle camera, which is designed to image the surface of the comet's nucleus. The team noted two distinct types of pits: deep ones with steep sides and shallower pits that more closely resemble those seen on other comets, such as 9P/Tempel 1 and 81P/Wild. The team also observed that jets of gas and dust streamed from the sides of the deep, steep-sided pits —a phenomenon they did not see in the shallower pits.
Initially, the Rosetta team suspected that discrete, explosive events might be responsible for creating the deeper pits. Rosetta observed one such outburst during its approach to the comet, on April 30, 2014. Catching this event in the act allowed the team to quantify how much material had been ejected, and it quickly became obvious that the numbers just didn't stack up. Explosive outbursts alone could not explain the formation of these giant pits.


The amount of material from the outburst was large—about 100,000 kilograms—but this is small compared to the size of the comet and could only explain a hole a couple of meters in diameter," Bodewits explained. "The pits we see are much larger. It seems that outbursts aren't driving the process, but instead are one of the consequences."
Based on the Rosetta observations, the team has proposed a model for the formation of these sinkholes. A source of heat beneath the comet's surface causes ices (primarily water, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide) to sublimate. The voids created by the loss of these ice chunks eventually grow large enough that their ceilings collapse under their own weight, giving rise to the deep, steep-sided circular pits seen on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.


[Image: 5-rosettaspace.jpg]
This close-up image shows the most active pit, known as Seth_01, observed on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft. A new study suggests that this pit and others like it could be sinkholes, formed by a surface collapse process similar to the way these features form on Earth. Credit: Vincent et al., Nature Publishing Group

The collapse exposes comet ices to sunlight for the first time, which causes the ice chunks to begin sublimating immediately. These deeper pits are therefore thought to be relatively young. Their shallower counterparts, on the other hand, are most likely older sinkholes with more thoroughly eroded sidewalls and bottoms that have been filled in by dust and ice chunks.
"In some sense, these deep sinkholes remind me of the crater excavated on comet Tempel I by the Deep Impact mission," said Michael A'Hearn, a Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of astronomy at UMD and a co-author on the study. A'Hearn also served as principal investigator on the Deep Impact mission, which coincidentally celebrates its ten-year anniversary this summer. "The process is completely different, of course, but both allow us to achieve the same broad goal of being able to see deeper into a comet."
The European Space Agency officially extended the Rosetta mission on June 23, 2015, meaning that the spacecraft will have the opportunity to track comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a much longer time period as it moves away from the sun. The comet will reach perihelion, or its closest point to the sun, on August 13, 2015. The extension expands the mission by nine months, from the planned end date of December 2015 to September 2016. The extra observational time will enable the team to see how the comet's surface responds to decreasing solar radiation.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Image: Increasingly active Comet 67P
More information: "Large heterogeneities in comet 67P as revealed by active pits from sinkhole collapse," Jean-Baptiste Vincent, et al., was published in the July 2, 2015 issue of the journal Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature14564 .
Journal reference:Nature [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]
Provided byUniversity of Maryland [/url]


Read more at: [url=http://phys.org/news/2015-07-rosetta-spacecraft-sinkholes-comet.html#jCp]http://phys.org/news/2015-07-rosetta-spacecraft-sinkholes-comet.html#jCp
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#91
what is the gaping half oval hole in the lower right side of this image?

something came hurtling through the ridge there and left quite a gap?
what a great looking comet surface, I had fun zipper glyphing up a face

[Image: 4-rosettaspace.jpg]
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#92
Quote:incomming duck!!!


Do micro-organisms explain features on comets?

9 hours ago

[Image: domicroorgan.jpg]
A close up image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken at a distance of 130 km using the OSIRIS camera on the Rosetta spacecraft. A range of features, including boulders, craters and steep cliffs are clearly visible. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, studied in detail by the European Space Agency Rosetta and Philae spacecraft since September 2014, is a body with distinct and unexpected features. Now two astronomers have a radical explanation for its properties – micro-organisms that shape cometary activity. Dr Max Wallis of the University of Cardiff set out their ideas today (Monday 6 July) at the National Astronomy Meeting at Venue Cymru in Llandudno, Wales.

[Image: 17151570652_5b283026f7_o.jpg]

Rosetta data have revealed an irregular 'duck shaped' comet with about 4.3 by 4.1 km in extent.
youareaduck (Detail in  D'tale of D'tail~3.33 km)
It appears to have a black crust and underlying ice and images show large, smooth 'seas', flat-bottomed craters and a surface peppered with mega-boulders. The crater lakes are re-frozen bodies of water overlain with organic debris. Parallel furrows relate to the flexing of the asymmetric and spinning double-lobed body, which generates fractures in the ice beneath.
Dr Wallis, and his colleague Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, Director of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology, argue that these features are all consistent with a mixture of ice and organic material that consolidate under the sun's warming during the comet's orbiting in space, when active micro-organisms can be supported.


In their model, the micro-organisms probably require liquid water bodies to colonise the comet
[Image: ele-kelvinwake-2.png]
and could inhabit cracks in its ice and 'snow'. Organisms containing anti-freeze salts are particularly good at adapting to these conditions and some could be active at temperatures as low as -40 degrees Celsius.




Sunlit areas of P/67 Churyumov-Gerasimenko have approached this temperature last September, when at 500 million km from the Sun and weak gas emissions were evident. As it travels to its closest point to the Sun – perihelion at 195 million km – the temperature is rising, gassing increasing and the micro-organisms should become increasingly active.
Dr Wallis said: "Rosetta has already shown that the comet is not to be seen as a deep-frozen inactive body, but supports geological processes and could be more hospitable to micro-life than our Arctic and Antarctic regions".
Wallis and Wickramasinghe cite further evidence for life in the detection by Philae of abundant complex organic molecules on the surface of the comet and in the infrared images taken by Rosetta.
Professor Wickramasinghe commented: "If the Rosetta orbiter has found evidence of life on the comet, it would be a fitting tribute to mark the centenary of the birth of Sir Fred Hoyle, one of the undisputable pioneers of astrobiology."
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Image: Increasingly active Comet 67P
Provided byRoyal Astronomical Society [Image: img-dot.gif] [Image: img-dot.gif]


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-micro-organ...s.html#jCp


Improv is as is was.


Quote:Levin will have his day.
Wickramasinghe???
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#93
(07-04-2015, 07:27 PM)Vianova Wrote: what is the gaping half oval hole in the lower right side of this image?

something came hurtling through the ridge there and left quite a gap?
what a great looking comet surface, I had fun zipper glyphing up a face

[Image: 4-rosettaspace.jpg]


A MACRO-BITE by  Arrow micro-organisms?
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#94
Quote:"It would be too cruel if the increasing sunlight, finally charging Philae's batteries, also removed the ice supporting the lander, leaving sufficient power for Philae to broadcast its last message: "Help, I'm falling…"

Could sinkholes on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko pose yet another risk to Philae?

Jul 02, 2015 by Monica Grady

[Image: couldsinkhol.jpg]
Sinkholes on comet 67P could be a great thing for science – but not if they they bury Philae. Credit: Vincent et al., Nature Publishing GroupVincent et al., Nature Publishing Group

Images of the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko have been decorating the front pages of newspapers and journals for the last few months. They have allowed us to see the full magnificence of the comets' cratered terrain. Now a study suggests that these craters are actually sinkholes, created in a similar way to those on Earth when the surface layer of the ground suddenly collapses. While these pits could help us map the terrain of the comet, they could also pose a risk to the Philae spacecraft.

As the comet moves closer towards the sun, its activity has increased, leading to greater amounts of material from the exterior being turned into gas through the process of sublimation (where solid turns to a gas without first turning to liquid). It is clear, though, from the images of the navigation camera, that 67P is not equally active across all of its surface, and that jets of gas and dust can appear very quickly in sudden bursts of activity. This is not consistent with a gradual erosion of ice from across the comets' surface as temperature increases.

The high resolution camera, OSIRIS, has shown panoramic images of craters, crevasses and valleys on the comet – including craters from which jets are emanating. That these are instead sinkholes is interesting but also slightly worrying, as such pits have the awkward habit of opening up in the most inconvenient of places at the most inconvenient of times.

The science of sinkholes
Sinkholes are caused when (usually) water washes away sub-surface rock and sediment, leaving a cap of material above a cavern. The cap can collapse at any time, becoming particularly vulnerable in times of increased rain or flooding.
The researchers believe that sinkhole formation on 67P may be a consequence of sudden collapse of a ceiling overlying a buried cavity. They speculate that the cavities might have formed by collisions between metre-sized bodies at slow speeds, early in the Solar System's history. Alternatively, they might be caused by sublimation of subsurface ice.

[Image: 1-couldsinkhol.jpg]
More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Credit: U.S. Geological Survey

Whatever the cause of the underlying cavities, images from OSIRIS show that clusters of sinkholes with different depths and diameters across the surface of 67P. After the ceiling of a sinkhole has collapsed, fresh surfaces are exposed to solar radiation, following which jets form by sublimation of ice from the walls of the freshly opened hole.
Newly-formed, active sinkholes are deeper and have narrower diameters than ancient, dormant ones. If we could peer down into one of these holes, we would probably see layers of rock and ice, gradually becoming darker as more of the ice sublimated – leaving rock and dust behind. Dormant holes, on the other hand, seem to be filled in with debris, presumably of dust and rock from the sides of the hole which have collapsed.
What is intriguing about the sinkholes is the opportunity they provide to determine the regional geology and history of 67P's surface.Sinkholes on similar terrain have similarly-sized holes. That means we can map the entire terrain of the comet based on the size of these pits. Similarly, the depth of sinkholes also matters. Since more shallow and debris-filled sinkholes tend to be older than deep ones, we can establish a chronology based on the depth.

[Image: 2-couldsinkhol.jpg]
Image of the most active pit, known as Seth_01. Credit: Vincent et al., Nature Publishing GroupWhat we all have to hope is that Philae is not perched precariously on the ceiling of one of these sub-surface cavities.

It would be too cruel if the increasing sunlight, finally charging Philae's batteries, also removed the ice supporting the lander, leaving sufficient power for Philae to broadcast its last message: "Help, I'm falling…"

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Rosetta spacecraft sees sinkholes on comet




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#95
Recall:

Ma'at @ that!


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#96
Philae's comet may host alien 'life': astronomers


9 hours ago

[Image: 1-animagetaken.jpg]
An image taken by Rosetta's Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko shows part of the lander, in a photo released by the European Space Agency (ESA) on November 13,2014


Astronomers proposed a novel explanation Monday for the strange appearance of the comet carrying Europe's robot probe Philae through outer space: alien microscopic life.

Many of the frozen dust ball's features, which include a black crust over lakes of ice, flat-bottomed craters and mega-boulders scattered on the surface, were "consistent" with the presence of microbes, they said.
Observations by the European Space Agency's Rosetta comet orbiter has shown that 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko "is not to be seen as a deep-frozen inactive body, but supports geological processes," Max Wallis of the University of Cardiff said in a statement issued by the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
In fact, the comet racing towards the Sun at a speed of 32.9 kilometres (20.4 miles) per second, "could be more hospitable to micro-life than our Arctic and Antarctic regions."
Wallis and his colleague Chandra Wickramasinghe of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology, presented their theory Monday to a meeting of the RAS in Llandudno, Wales.
They pointed to Rosetta's detection of complex organic material, which gave the comet its surprisingly super-dark and low-reflecting surface, as "evidence for life."
Furthermore, Wickramasinghe told AFP that 67P's gas ejections started "at distances from the Sun too far away to trigger surface sublimation".

[Image: 5-anartistsimp.jpg]
An artist's impression of Rosetta's lander Philae (back view) on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

This implied that micro-organisms under the comet's surface had been "building pockets of high pressure gases that crack overlying ice and vent organic particles," he said by email.
Wickramasinghe also cited a rugged surface with evidence of re-sealed cracks and displaced boulders, and a covering of organics which "need to be resupplied".
The observed features "are all consistent with a mixture of ice and organic material that consolidate under the Sun's warming during the comet's orbiting in space, when active micro-organisms can be supported," said the statement.
Micro-organisms could use liquid water to colonise the comet —infiltrating cracks in the ice and "snow" during warmer periods when the cosmic wanderer is nearer the Sun, the duo said.
"Organisms containing anti-freeze salts are particularly good at adapting to these conditions and some could be active at temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees Celsius (minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit)."

Sunlit areas of the comet already approached this temperature last September, when it was about 500 million kilometres (310 million miles) from the Sun, and emitting weak jets of gas.
Comets follow elliptical orbits around the Sun, and warm as they draw closer, causing a process of solid-to-gas transformation called sublimation, which is what gives them their spectacular tails.
As 67P approaches its closest point to the Sun, about 185 million km on August 13, "the micro-organisms should become increasingly active," the pair speculated.
And hopefully Rosetta and Philae will catch some of the action live.
Comets are frozen balls of dust and ice left over from the Solar System's formation some 4.6 billion years ago, and scientists hope that unravelling their makeup may provide insights into Earth's own creation.
One theory is that they smashed into our infant planet, providing it with precious water and the chemical building blocks for life.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Do micro-organisms explain features on comets?
More information: phys.org/news/2015-07-micro-organisms-features-comets.html

http://phys.org/news/2015-07-philae-come....html#nRlv


Quote:Levin will have his day.
Wickramasinghe?


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#97
Stork-a-doodle-doo !!!

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Icy comets serve as storks for life on Earth

14 hours ago

[Image: icycometsser.jpg]
This simulation depicts a comet hitting the young Earth, generating the amino acids necessary for life. Image courtesy of Matthew Genge/Imperial College London.

Early Earth was an inhospitable place where the planet was often bombarded by comets and other large astrophysical bodies.


Some of those comets contained complex prebiotic materials, such as amino acids and peptides (chains of amino acids), which are some of the most basic building blocks of life on Earth.
"The survivability of these compounds under impact conditions is mostly unknown," said Lawrence Livermore's Nir Goldman, who recently received a NASA grant to continue his astrobiology research. "Our research hopes to answer these questions and give an indication for what types of potentially life-building compounds would be produced under these conditions."
Basically, Goldman is trying to figure out if life on Earth really did come from out of this world.


Goldman's early research found that the impact of icy comets crashing into Earth billions of years ago could have produced a variety of small prebiotic or life-building compounds. His work using quantum simulations predicted that the simple molecules found in comets (such as water, ammonia, methanol and carbon dioxide) could have supplied the raw materials, and the impact with early Earth would have yielded an abundant supply of energy to drive the synthesis of compounds like protein forming amino acids. In later work, researchers from Imperial College in London and University of Kent conducted a series of experiments very similar to Goldman's simulations in which a projectile was fired using a light gas gun into a typical cometary ice mixture. The result: Several different types of amino acids formed.
"Impact events could have not only delivered prebiotic precursors to the primitive planet, but the sudden increase in pressure and temperature from the impact itself was likely a driving factor in synthesizing their assembly into these primary structures," Goldman said.
Specifically, this new $500,000 grant will fund quantum simulation studies to understand aqueous mixtures of pre-formed amino acids under impact conditions. Goldman's current efforts will extend his previous work by looking at one step higher in complexity, where extreme pressures and temperatures from impact could induce the formation of more intricate chemical structures like peptide chains or simple proteins.
"Large astrophysical bodies such as comets likely already contain more complex prebiotic materials, like amino acids. It's possible that pre-existing amino acids would have experienced additional impacts during periods of heavy bombardment on early Earth," Goldman said. "Our quantum simulations hope to help answer these questions, and to give an indication as to what set of thermodynamic conditions promotes their assembly into larger structures."
How and when prebiotic organic material appeared on early Earth has been debated for close to 60 years, starting with the seminal Miller-Urey experiments, which showed that amino acids could be produced in aqueous mixtures subjected to electrical discharges, simulating lightning on early Earth.
Large bodies from space are carriers of prebiotic materials. Previous analysis of dust samples from comet Wild 2 has shown the presence of the amino acid glycine in the captured material. In addition, dipeptides (i.e., an amino acid dimer) likely exist in interstellar ices. Assuming survival upon delivery to Earth, these could have acted as catalysts in the formation of a number of prebiotic compounds, including sugars and enzymes.
"Our predictions will help spur future collaboration with experimental groups to characterize the synthesis of primary biomaterials due to exposure to extreme pressures and temperatures," Goldman said.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Irradiating formamide with meteorite dust can lead to synthesis of prebiotic compounds
Provided byLawrence Livermore National Laboratory


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-icy-comets-...h.html#jCp




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#98
Philae phones home for the eighth time (Update)


July 10, 2015 by Mariette Le Roux

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An image taken by Rosetta's Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko shows part of the lander, in a photo released by the European Space Agency (ESA) on November 13, 2014
Europe's robot lab Philae, zipping towards the Sun on a comet, has called home for the eighth time since waking up from hibernation last month, French space agency CNES said Friday.

After a 15-day silence, Philae had a ~20-minute conversation with ground control via its mother ship Rosetta, in orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, it said in a statement.
This was "very encouraging news for the remainder of the Philae mission," the agency said.
There had been no news from the washing machine-sized robot lab since June 24, a disquieting break for mission controllers.


Philae first woke up on June 13 after seven months in hibernation on the comet's surface.
The tiny lander touched down on November 12 last year after a 10-year journey piggybacking on Rosetta.
The landing was bumpy—the tiny lab bounced several times on the craggy surface before ending up in deep shade, deprived of sunlight to replenish its battery.
Philae had enough onboard power to send home data from about 60 hours of tests conducted with eight of its 10 instruments, before going into standby mode on November 15.
But the lander's power pack is being recharged as 67P streaks toward the Sun at about 31 kilometres (19 miles) per second.
Thursday's eighth contact was the longest yet, with an uninterrupted stretch of 12 minutes, said the CNES, which allowed the downloading of critical data obtained from Philae's prodding and probing of its alien world.
"The link was by far the best yet, with very few interruptions," said the statement.
"It bodes well for the futurebecause such a good connection would allow the teams to take control of Philae and give it commands"—possibly to shift position or start its drill for a sub-surface examination.
Philae is equipped with ten instruments, with which its creators hope to learn more about the properties of comets and their possible role in bringing life to Earth.
Comets are frozen balls of dust, ice and gas left over from the Solar System's formation some 4.6 billion years ago.
Some experts believe that comets smashed into our infant planet, providing it with precious water and the chemical building blocks for life.
Comet 67P is approaching perihelion—its closest point to the Sun at about 185 million km (115 million miles)—on August 13, and scientists are excited about getting a first-hand view of the dramatic change it will go through as it sheds more and more material.

[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Scientists record thud of Philae's comet landing


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-07-weeks-silen...r.html#jCp
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#99
(11-16-2014, 02:57 PM)EA Wrote:
Quote:what I want to know is if the cat lived.

"Here is/There was a "Schrödinger's Cat"

@ the moment keith  Damned
"Schrödinger's Philae" is alive/dead

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itz in a coma... Rofl    literally!!!  Rofl Rofl Rofl
It Rights itself
It Writes itself
Itza Rite itself

Glad that was answered 8x  so far!
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